Jorida Cila

Jorida Cila
Public Health Agency of Canada | PHAC

PhD

About

12
Publications
4,830
Reads
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60
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2019 - May 2021
Ryerson University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2019 - present
York University
Position
  • Part-time faculty
September 2010 - December 2018
York University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2012 - December 2018
York University
Field of study
  • Social and Personality Psychology
September 2010 - November 2012
York University
Field of study
  • Social and Personality Psychology
October 2005 - September 2006
IHS, Erasmus University
Field of study
  • Urban Management and Development - Urban Social Development

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Objectives: Ethnic first names are a visible product of diversity in the West, yet little is known about the psychological factors that influence naming preferences and choices among bicultural individuals. Method: Participants in Studies 1a (South Asian Canadians; N = 326) and 1b (Iranian Canadians; N = 126) were prospective parents who complet...
Chapter
In this chapter we will present three different contexts of intergroup relations that offer a fertile ground for the application of Social Identity Theory in the Canadian context. The first context is that of Aboriginal Canadians and their evolving relationship with non-Aboriginal Canadians. The second context focuses on French–English relations, a...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we argue that there are 2 dominant underlying themes in discussions of strategies for dealing with diversity-similarity and difference. When we are dealing with social groups, a number of basic psychological processes, as well as popular media and research-based narratives, make it easier to highlight difference rather than similari...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined the practice of language brokering (LB) among South Asian Canadian college-age adults and how such practice relates to acculturation to mainstream and heritage cultures, as well as personal empowerment. One hundred and twenty-four young adults reported on three different indices of LB (brokering frequency, diversity of pe...
Article
Full-text available
This study (N = 234) examined Muslim Canadian young adults’ openness to interfaith dating and marriage. We extended previous research on interfaith dating by examining the role of mainstream cultural identification and family connectedness, in addition to religiosity and gender. Participants reported more openness to dating than marrying a non-Musl...
Article
Full-text available
When conducting cross-cultural studies, researchers often rely on generalised categorisations (e.g., East–West), frequently assuming homogeneity within each of the cultural groups being compared. We argue that such broad categorisations may be misleading and that careful demarcation of cultural groups that takes into consideration their specific so...
Data
Full-text available
When conducting cross-cultural studies, researchers often rely on generalised categorisations (e.g., East–West), frequently assuming homogeneity within each of the cultural groups being compared. We argue that such broad categorisations may be misleading and that careful demarcation of cultural groups that takes into consideration their specific so...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In this line of research I examine how valued social identifications, such as (ethnic and mainstream) culture and religion, relate to psychological well-being among minority group members, with a focus on Muslims and Jews. The relationship of multiple group memberships with well-being is a relatively new area of research, and my work provides initial evidence on the importance of this approach for multiply-identified minorities.
Project
Choosing a name for one's child is not a random act. Among bicultural parents in particular, this is the time when identities are negotiated and decisions are made about how to position the child in the world. In my work, I examine how bicultural individuals' choices of ethnic or mainstream names for their children are associated with a number of cultural factors, primarily: (a) acculturation to ethnic and mainstream culture, (b) motivation for ethno-cultural continuity, and (c) perceived negative consequences of ethnic names.