Jorge Ramirez

Jorge Ramirez
University of Exeter | UoE · Department of Geography

PhD physical geography
modelling methane from tropical peatlands

About

47
Publications
24,700
Reads
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1,192
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
903 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Additional affiliations
December 2012 - March 2015
Taru Leading Edge Private Limited
Position
  • Flood consultant
October 2006 - October 2013
University of Hull
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
October 2009 - October 2013
University of Leeds
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
Globally, between 1950 and 2011 nearly 80,000 debris flow fatalities occurred in densely populated regions in mountainous terrain. Mitigation of these hazards includes the construction of check dams, which limit coarse sediment transport and in the European Alps number in the 100,000s. Check dam functionality depends on periodic, costly maintenance...
Article
Full-text available
Catchment hydro-morphological response is mainly conditioned on rainfall properties, such as rainfall intensity, storm duration and frequency, and the timing of these events. Rainfall spatial variability is likewise a major determinant affecting streamflow, erosion, and sediment transport, and is explored largely in the context of heavy rain trigge...
Article
Full-text available
The scarcity of model input and calibration data has limited efforts in reconstructing scenarios of past floods in many regions globally. Recently, the number of studies that use distributed post-flood observation data collected throughout flood-affected communities (e.g. face-to-face interviews) are increasing. However, a systematic method that ap...
Article
Full-text available
Disasters induced by natural hazards or extreme events consist of interacting human and natural components. While progress has been made to mitigate and adapt to natural hazards, much of the existing research lacks interdisciplinary approaches that equally consider both natural and social processes. More importantly, this lack of integration betwee...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of complex social-ecological systems (SES) as a means for capturing system dynamics properties (e.g. interactions and feedbacks) has gained attention in policymaking and advancing evidence in understanding complex systems. In contexts with limited data, conceptual system dynamic models offer a promising entry point to overcome challenge...
Thesis
Check dams are structures that stabilize mountain rivers by decreasing flow velocity and reducing channel incision. Over long time scales (100 years), a series of check dams constructed in a particular river reach can have significant effects on sediment and water dynamics and river channel responses. The maintenance, repair or replacement of check...
Article
Full-text available
The role of subtropical peatlands as a source for methane gas is not well understood, partly due to uncertainties surrounding environmental controls on gas ebullition patterns. Past studies have pointed to an array of environmental factors controlling ebullition, although we have found that ebullition patterns can be replicated by a model consideri...
Article
Full-text available
Sensitivity analysis (SA) describes how varying inputs to a model subsequently varies its outputs. Its inclusion can support the systematic calibration of numerical models to back-calculate intensity properties of past torrent events that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to collect during their occurrence. Sensitivity analysis for model c...
Article
Flood risks are dynamically changing over time. Over decades and centuries, the main drivers for flood risk change are influenced either by perturbations or slow alterations in the natural environment or, more importantly, by socio-economic development and human interventions. However, changes in the natural and human environment are intertwined. T...
Presentation
Full-text available
Check dams are structures to stabilize mountain rivers by decreasing flow velocity and reducing channel erosion. Over long time scales (100 yrs) a series of check dams constructed in a particular river reach can have significant effects on sediment and water dynamics and river channel responses. Over time the maintenance and repairing or even the r...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent extreme natural disasters have focused the attention of the global community to society’s vulnerability to these events. Simultaneously these natural disasters occur within a broader social and physical context that is interconnected and may include climate change and economic crises. While progress has been made to mitigate and adapt to nat...
Presentation
Full-text available
A method to investigate geomorphic changes in rivers are landscape evolution models (LEMs) that simulate the movement of water and sediment. Although much progress has been made in the development of LEMs, few have been tested in rivers subject to human perturbations and extreme forcings. As such, it remains uncertain if LEMs are useful and stable...
Article
Full-text available
Surat city of India, situated 100 km downstream of Ukai dam and 19.4 km upstream from the mouth of river Tapi has experienced the largest flood in 2006. The peak discharge of about 25,770m3/s released from the Ukai dam was responsible for a disaster. To assess the flood and find inundation in low lying areas, simulation work is carried out under th...
Article
Full-text available
A paper for Water Resources Research Key points: Modelled ebullition and gas storage replicate patterns in natural peats Peat structure contributes directly to the variability of ebullition in space and time Traditional methods to measure ebullition can equally overestimate and underestimate flux by 20% Abstract. We investigated the effect of sampl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential much greater than carbon dioxide, and one of the major sources of naturally occurring CH4 are peatlands. Large amounts of CH4 can be transported from peat to the atmosphere through bubbles (ebullition). Sources of CH4 from tropical/subtropical peats may have an important role in medi...
Presentation
Full-text available
Originally, the Kander river flowed into the Aare river causing massive flooding in the region of Thun and this is why the Kander river was deviated to lake Thun by engineering works. Besides the reduction of flooding, the goal of this deviation (Kander correction) was to prevent damming of the Aare from large sediment loads delivered by the Kander...
Article
Full-text available
Surat, India is a coastal city with a population of approximately 4.5 million people that lies on the banks of the river 10 Tapi and is located 100 km downstream from the Ukai dam. Given Surat's geographic location the city is repeatedly exposed to flooding caused by large emergency dam releases into the Tapi river combined with high tide water lev...
Article
Full-text available
The controls on methane (CH4) bubbling (ebullition) from peatlands are uncertain, but evidence suggests that physical factors related to gas transport and storage within the peat matrix are important. Variability in peat pore size and the permeability of layers within peat can produce ebullition that ranges from steady to erratic in time and can af...
Article
Full-text available
Storm tide (combination of storm surge and the astronomical tide) flooding is a natural hazard with significant global social and economic consequences. For this reason,government agencies and stakeholders need storm tide flood maps to determine population and infrastructure at risk to present and future levels of inundation. Computer models of var...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Surat, India is a coastal city with a population of five million that lies on the banks of the river Tapti and is located downstream from the Ukai dam. Given Surat's geographic location the population of the city are repeatedly exposed to flooding caused by high tidal water levels combined with large emergency dam releases into the Tapti river. A f...
Article
Full-text available
Bubbling (ebullition) of greenhouse gases, particularly methane, from peatlands has been attributed to environmental forcings, such as changes in atmospheric pressure. However, observations from peat soils suggest that ebullition and environmental forcing may not always be correlated and that interactions between bubbles and the peat structure may...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential much greater than carbon dioxide, and one of the major sources of naturally occurring CH4 are peatlands. Large amounts of CH4 can be transported from peat to the atmosphere through bubbles (ebullition). Although wetland distribution is roughly bimodal with approximately 50% located i...
Article
Full-text available
Bubbling (ebullition) of greenhouse gases, particularly methane, from peatlands has been attributed to environmental forcings, such as changes in atmospheric pressure. However, observations from peat soils suggest that ebullition and environmental forcing may not always be correlated and that interactions between bubbles and the peat structure may...
Article
Abstract The hydraulic modelling of tidal estuarine environments has been largely limited to complex 3D models that are computationally expensive. This makes them unsuitable for applications which make use of live data to make real/near time forecasts, such as the modelling of storm surge propagation and associated flood inundation risks. To addres...
Article
Full-text available
Bubble dynamics in porous media are of great importance in industrial and natural systems. Of particular significance is the impact that bubble-related emissions (ebullition) of greenhouse gases from porous media could have on global climate (e.g., wetland methane emissions). Thus predictions of future changes in bubble storage, movement and ebulli...
Data
Sahara rivers in Google Earth from PLOS ONE publication "Were Rivers Flowing across the Sahara During the Last Interglacial? Implications for Human Migration through Africa"
Article
Full-text available
Landscape evolution models (LEMs) simulate the geomorphic development of river basins over long time periods and large space scales (100s–1000s of years, 100s of km2). Due to these scales they have been developed with simple steady flow models that enable long time steps (e.g. years) to be modelled, but not shorter term hydrodynamic effects (e.g. t...
Article
Full-text available
Human migration north through Africa is contentious. This paper uses a novel palaeohydrological and hydraulic modelling approach to test the hypothesis that under wetter climates c.100,000 years ago major river systems ran north across the Sahara to the Mediterranean, creating viable migration routes. We confirm that three of these now buried palae...
Article
Full-text available
Insect pollination benefits over three quarters of the world's major crops. There is growing concern that observed declines in pollinators may impact on production and revenues from animal pollinated crops. Knowing the distribution of pollinators is therefore crucial for estimating their availability to pollinate crops; however, in general, we have...
Thesis
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential much greater than carbon dioxide, and one of the major sources of naturally occurring CH4 are peatlands. Large amounts of CH4 can be transported from peat to the atmosphere through bubbles (ebullition). The exact controls of ebullition remain uncertain, but evidence suggests that phy...
Article
Full-text available
Precipitation intensities and the frequency of extreme events are projected to increase under climate change. These rainfall changes will lead to increases in the magnitude and frequency of flood events that will, in turn, affect patterns of erosion and deposition within river basins. These geomorphic changes to river systems may affect flood conve...
Article
Full-text available
Precipitation intensities and the frequency of extreme events are projected to increase under climate change. These rainfall changes will lead to increases in the magnitude and frequency of flood events that will, in turn, affect patterns of erosion and deposition within river basins. These geomorphic changes to river systems may affect flood conve...
Article
Full-text available
The Mediterranean Sea provides a major route for heat and freshwater loss from the North Atlantic and thus is an important cause of the high density of Atlantic waters. In addition to the traditional view that loss of fresh water via the Mediterranean enhances the general salinity of the North Atlantic, and the interior of the eastern North Atlanti...
Article
Full-text available
The Gibraltar Exchange regulates the amount of water supplied to the Mediterranean to balance net evaporation, but also the a major term in the of buoyancy (i.e., heat and freshwater) budget of the North Atlantic Ocean. As such, it is a critical term to determine in order for the palaeoceanographic behaviour of two ocean basins to be understood. We...
Data
Precipitation intensities and the frequency of ex-treme events are projected to increase under climate change. These rainfall changes will lead to increases in the magnitude and frequency of flood events that will, in turn, affect patterns of erosion and deposition within river basins. These geomor-phic changes to river systems may affect flood con...
Article
Full-text available
Past changes in the density and momentum structure of oceanic circulation are an important aspect of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and consequently climate. However, very little is known about past changes in the vertical density structure of the ocean, even very extensively studied systems such as the North Atlantic. H...
Article
Full-text available
Past changes in the density and momentum structure of oceanic circulation are an important aspect of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and consequently climate. However, very little is known about past changes in the vertical density structure of the ocean, even very extensively studied systems such as the North Atlantic. H...
Article
Northern peatlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane, and it is important to understand the mechanisms of methane loss from these peatlands so that future rates of methane emission can be predicted. Methane is lost to the atmosphere from peatlands by diffusion, by plant transport, and as bubbles (ebullition). We argue that ebull...
Chapter
Full-text available
Northern peatlands are one of the largest natural sources of atmospheric methane (CH4), and it is important to understand the mechanisms of CH4 loss from these peatlands so that future rates of CH4 emission can be predicted. CH4 is lost to the atmosphere from peatlands by diffusion, by plant transport, and as bubbles (ebullition). We argue that ebu...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Scope of the workshop May 6-8th, 2019 at the University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland Natural disasters consist of human and natural components that are interconnected. While progress has been made to mitigate and adapt to natural hazards, much of the existing research lacks interdisciplinary approaches that equally consider both natural and social processes. More importantly, this lack of integration between approaches remains a major challenge in developing disaster risk management plans for communities. The proposed early career researcher workshop on Modelling risk and resilience in human and natural systems aims to: Establish the progress made in modelling risk and resilience to natural hazards, Identify remaining challenges, and Discover opportunities for future research. To achieve this, we are bringing together international researchers engaged in modelling risk and resilience to natural hazards. The result of the workshop will be a commentary article, in a scientific journal, based on the findings of presentations, group discussions, and post-workshop engagement of workshop participants. Format Day one of the workshop will consist of oral and poster sessions that showcase the research of workshop participants. Workshop keynote speakers include: Prof. Tatiana Filatova, University of Twente Prof. Susan Cutter, University of South Carolina On day two, workshop participants will break up into five parallel groups for discussion related to their assigned research theme that include: Indicators of risk and resilience Conceptualizing dynamics between human and natural systems Modeling human and natural systems Modelling human behavior towards risk and resilience Interdisciplinary challenges and communicating model results The final day is reserved for presentation of the group discussion findings to all workshop participants, for feedback, cross validation and planning of a commentary article for a scientific journal. How to apply and funding We have already invited 20 participants for the workshop, and are opening this call for additional self-funded participants. Therefore, travel, accommodation, and other expenses will have to be covered by the workshop participant. Preference will be given to candidates who are enrolled in a Ph.D. program or recently (1-2 years) awarded a Ph.D. However, we also welcome applications from postdocs who have received a Ph.D. within 5 years. To apply to participate in this workshop, please submit: a title and 100-300 word abstract for your proposed presentation. a 100-300 word personal statement discussing your academic background, why you are interested in participating in this workshop, and which workshop research theme aligns with your research. Submissions should be emailed to jorge.ramirez@giub.unibe.ch by March 22nd, 2019. Accepted participants will be notified by March 25th. 2019. You must register by April 1st, 2019. Organizers and support Dr. Jorge Ramirez, University of Bern, Institute of Geography Dr. MD Sarwar Hossain Sohel, University of Bern, Institute of Geography We thank the Swiss National Science Foundation and Mobiliar Lab for financial and administrative support.
Project
Freshwater sediments had been recently recognized as an important source of methane emission. Characterized by rapid sedimentation and relative high organic matter content, sediments trapped by dams now become a major concern in terms of methane production and emission. Bubbling is the most efficient way for methane to reach the atmosphere and had been long neglected/underestimated due to its high variability in time and space. While bubbling-induced methane flux is seasonally driven by methane production which is largely a biochemical process, it's short-term variation is controlled purely by physical processes. Our main focus is on revealing methane bubble formation, transport and release processes in freshwater sediments. Through a series of lab experiments, our understanding of these processes will be improved and a process-based bubble formation and release model will be developed.