Jorge DEL CUETO Chocano

Jorge DEL CUETO Chocano
Université Libre de Bruxelles | ULB · Crop Production and Biostimulation Laboratory (CPBL)

PostDoc

About

18
Publications
4,175
Reads
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295
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
284 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - present
Agroscope
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2016 - July 2020
Agroscope
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2014 - January 2015
University of Copenhagen
Position
  • PhD Student Stay
Education
October 2004 - April 2010
Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche
Field of study
  • Agronomic Engineer

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, are plant defence substances. In the present study, the impact of Monilinia laxa inoculation under controlled conditions on phenolic content of apricot branches was investigated. A bi-parental hybrid population issued from Bergeron and Bakour cultivars (BerBa) and consisting of 192 hybrids was studied. The...
Article
Organic apricot production is currently not profitable. The main obstacle to sustainable profitability is the brown rot disease caused by the fungus Monilinia laxa. Differences exist in the apricot germplasm in the brown rot susceptibility. A good evaluation of Monilinia is essential for a precise diagnosis of the disease and for exhibiting differe...
Article
Monilinia fructicola has been a quarantine pathogen in Europe until 2014; however, the disease risk remains large for Prunus species, because of the continuing spreading around Europe. In order to assess the impact of this fungus on apricot fruits, differences in cultivar susceptibility need to be evaluated. For this purpose, more than 50 different...
Article
How to make almonds palatable The domesticated almond tree has been feeding humans for millennia. Derivation from the wild, bitter, and toxic almond required loss of the cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin. Sánchez-Pérez et al. sequenced the almond genome and analyzed the genomic region responsible for this shift. The key change turned out to be a poi...
Article
Full-text available
Almond (Prunus dulcis) is the principal Prunus species in which the consumed and thus commercially important part of the fruit is the kernel. As a result of continued selection, the vast majority of almonds have a non-bitter sweet kernel. However, in the field there are trees carrying bitter kernels, which are toxic to humans and, consequently, nee...
Article
Full-text available
The bitterness and toxicity of wild-type seeds of Prunoideae is due to the cyanogenic glucoside amygdalin. In cultivated almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb), a dominant mutation at the Sk locus prevents amygdalin accumulation and thus results in edible sweet kernels. Here, we exploited sequence similarity and synteny between the genomes of alm...
Article
Full-text available
Almond bitterness is the most important trait for breeding programs since bitter-kernelled seedlings are usually discarded. Amygdalin and its precursor prunasin are degraded by specific enzymes called β-glucosidases. In order to better understand the genetic control of almond bitterness, some studies have shown differences in the location of prunas...
Article
Full-text available
Almond and sweet cherry are two economically important species of the Prunus genus. They both produce the cyanogenic glucosides prunasin and amygdalin. As part of a two-component defense system, prunasin and amygdalin release toxic hydrogen cyanide upon cell disruption. In this study, we investigated the potential role within prunasin and amygdalin...
Article
Full-text available
Flowering time is an important agronomic trait in almond since it is decisive to avoid the late frosts that affect production in early flowering cultivars. Evaluation of this complex trait is a long process because of the prolonged juvenile period of trees and the influence of environmental conditions affecting gene expression year by year. Consequ...
Article
Almond bitterness, caused by high amygdalin content, is the most important trait since bitter kernelled seedlings are usually discarded from breeding programs. Amygdalin and its precursor prunasin, both cyanogenic glucosides, are degraded by specific enzymes called β-glucosidases. In order to deep in the genetic control of almond bitterness some wo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
weet kernelled almond cultivars basically to avoid the lost of crops by frosts, the necessity to use inter-compatibles cultivars and because industry is mainly developed on sweet almonds. Regarding flowering time, chilling and heat requirements for breaking dormancy and flowering were studied in an almond progeny from the cross between the late flo...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Global climate change, towards higher temperature, greater aridity and more frequent erratic climate events, become a major threat to agricultural sustainability, food security and social stability, particularly in the Mediterranean regions but also in central and northern Europe. Hence, enhancing crop resilience to climate change is a major challenge facing the global agricultural community. Under agricultural systems, crop plants must cope with naturally occurring combinations of abiotic stresses, to which they respond by specific, molecular, metabolic and morpho-physiological changes that cannot be inferred from single stresses. Although breeding efforts showed a good record of progresses, phenotypic and conventional QTL-based breeding reached a plateau. C4FUTURE (Fortifying and Enhancing Resilience in C4 Crops for Current and Future Climate Change Adversities) will implement Machine Learning, Genomic Prediction & Selection, and Genome-wide Association Studies, which show superior results. These technologies will be supported by extensive phenotypic and phenomic crop characterizations including innovative techniques of root phenotyping and of canopy characterization in field by aerial and/or ground vectors, for responses to soil water ressources. The choice of two C4 cereal crops – maize and sorghum – is dictated by current climate change scenarios and the necessity to significantly and sustainably improve agricultural production, improve nutritional and health-promoting quality of the crop products, and ultimately improve human health, contributing actively to the United Nations’ Strategic Development Goals. The climate change scenarios predict a more dry, hot and carbon dioxide-laden Earth, in which C4 plants will be favored, meaning that humans will rely heavily on C4 crops like maize and sorghum. These crops are seeing strong resurgence in Europe for human food and animal feed production purposes. Therefore, C4FUTURE is well poised to invest technological assets to enhance climate change resilience in these crops, in preparation for the predicted climate change threats. C4FUTURE exploits the natural variation in maize and sorghum diversity panels to enhance adaptation to nitrogen and water stresses (individually and combined), being already major constrains on crop productivity and expected to accentuate due to climate change. A key to this project is in situ phenotyping of germplasm collections under various stress combinations across four Mediterranean sites, representing a climatic gradient. Advanced root and shoot phenotyping, integrative phenomic data collection, systems biology and genome mapping approaches will be employed to identify candidate genes underlying the response of these crops to nitrogen deficiency and drought. Candidate genes will be validated via transcriptomic, metabolomics and morpho-physiological techniques. Predictive analytics including machine learning and genomic prediction and selection models will be implemented to identify superior genotypes. Finally, decision-making models will be refined and used to design maize and sorghum ideotypes for current and future climatic profiles, and prototype genotypes will be developed and evaluated in the field. In the laboratory and field environments, C4FUTURE stakeholders will be actively involved, allowing the implementations using co-innovative approaches and tools, and ultimately allowing to improve solutions to the production environments. The results will provide comprehensive insights into C4 cereals adaptation to climate change and facilitate crop improvement and management strategies, thereby augmenting crop sustainability and food security.
Project
Identification of QTLs related with the tolerance to Monilia in apricots in order to develop molecular markers useful for the Marker Assisted Selection.