Jordi Boada

Jordi Boada
Sorbonne Université | UPMC · Laboratoire d'océanographie de Villefranche (LOV) - UMR 7093

Marine Ecology PhD

About

41
Publications
8,064
Reads
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223
Citations
Introduction
My research aims at understanding the state shift transitions in benthic marine systems to multiple physical and biological stressors. I am particularly interested in transitions from vegetated marine ecosystems to less productive states. I mix surveys, manipulative experiments and modelling to conceptualise collapses in marine systems, identify tipping-points and quantify resilience. More and more every day, my research is linked to the effects of global change.
Additional affiliations
May 2015 - August 2015
University of Tasmania
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2013 - December 2013
Università degli Studi di Sassari
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2011 - April 2016
Spanish National Research Council
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2011 - September 2012
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Marine Ecology
September 2009 - June 2011
University of Alicante
Field of study
  • Marine Sciences

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Predicting where state-changing thresholds lie can be inherently complex in ecosystems characterized by nonlinear dynamics. Unpacking the mechanisms underlying these transitions can help considerably reduce this unpredictability. We used empirical observations, field and laboratory experiments, and mathematical models to examine how differences in...
Thesis
Full-text available
Macrophyte systems are globally vulnerable to overgrazing, often shifting precipitously to functionally poorer alternative stable states triggered by herbivore population outbreaks. Sea urchin herbivory can cause shifts in shallow macrophyte systems in the Mediterranean (i.e. macroalgal communities and seagrass meadows) changing the structure of th...
Article
Full-text available
The Mediterranean Sea has sustained historically high levels of fishing since pre-Roman times. This once-abundant sea has witnessed major declines in apex predators, now largely restricted to isolated pockets within marine reserves. This depletion could critically impact macrophyte communities that are strongly structured by top-down processes. We...
Presentation
Full-text available
Macrophyte systems are globally vulnerable to overgrazing, often shifting precipitously to functionally poorer alternative stable states triggered by herbivore population outbreaks. Sea urchin herbivory can cause shifts in shallow macrophyte systems in the Mediterranean (i.e. macroalgal communities and seagrass meadows) changing the structure of th...
Article
Full-text available
Local, regional and global targets have been set to halt marine biodiversity loss. Europe has set its own policy targets to achieve Good Environmental Status (GES) of marine ecosystems by implementing the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) across member states. We combined an extensive dataset across five Mediterranean ecoregions including...
Article
Full-text available
The prevalence of local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity among populations is critical to accurately predicting when and where climate change impacts will occur. Currently, comparisons of thermal performance between populations are untested for most marine species or overlooked by models predicting the thermal sensitivity of species to extirpat...
Article
Full-text available
• Multiple anthropogenic stressors are causing a global decline in foundation species, including macrophytes, often resulting in the expansion of functionally different, more stressor-tolerant macrophytes. Previously subdominant species may experience further positive demographic feedback if they are exposed to weaker plant–herbivore interactions,...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are rapidly transforming the structural configuration of the planet's ecosystems, but these changes and their ecological consequences remain poorly quantified in underwater habitats. Here, we show that the loss of forest‐forming seaweeds and the rise of ground‐covering ‘turfs’ across four continents consistently resulted in the miniaturizati...
Article
Corallivorous crown-of-thorns starfishes (Acanthaster spp.) can decimate coral assemblages on Indo-Pacific coral reefs during population outbreaks. While initial drivers of population irruptions leading to outbreaks remain largely unknown, subsequent dispersal of outbreaks appears coincident with depletion of coral prey. Here, we used in situ time-...
Data
This apendix contains: Species compositions by modality in each Autonomous Community, and species-selective fishers' catch compositions by region and modality
Article
Full-text available
This study represents the first nationwide assessment of marine recreational fishing catch compositions in Spain. Catch data from 7848 recreational fishers were collected using an online survey that was conducted from February 2016 to February 2017. The major modalities of the recreational fishing sector: shore fishing, boat fishing, and spearfishi...
Article
Full-text available
Predators exert a strong influence on ecological communities by reducing the abundance of prey (consumptive effects) and shaping their foraging behavior (non‐consumptive effects). Although the prevalence of trophic cascades triggered by non‐consumptive effects is increasingly recognized in a wide range of ecosystems, how its relative strength chang...
Article
Full-text available
Patchy landscapes behave differently from continuous ones. Patch size can influence species behaviour, movement, feeding and predation rates, with flow-on consequences for the diversity of species that inhabit these patches. To understand the importance of patchiness on regional species pools, we measured decapod richness and abundance in several s...
Article
Full-text available
Characterizing fish communities must be a priority to safeguard resources and determine critical changes. Here, species richness and the spatial and temporal evolution in the structure of fish assemblages were analysed based on photos taken in underwater free-diving contests. A total of 29 contests held from 2008 to 2015 at four different locations...
Article
Full-text available
Herbivore outbreaks often trigger catastrophic overgrazing events in marine macrophyte ecosystems. The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, the dominant herbivore of shallow Mediterranean seascapes, is capable of precipitating shifts to barrens when its populations explode. Paracentrotus lividus is found ubiquitously in rocky macroalgal communities an...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing the knowledge about littoral fish communities is important for ecological sciences, fisheries and the sustainability of human communities. The scarcity of baseline data at large spatial scales in a fast-changing world makes it necessary to implement special programs to monitor natural ecosystems. In the present study, we evaluate littora...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing uncertainty of how marine ecosystems will respond to rising temperatures. While studies have focused on the impacts of warming on individual species, knowledge of how species interactions are likely to respond is scant. The strength of even simple two-species interactions is influenced by several interacting mechanisms, each pot...
Article
Full-text available
1. By modifying how critical ecosystem functions are distributed across the landscape, the spatial configuration and characteristics of patches can play a strong role in structuring communities. In strongly predator-controlled ecosystems, this patchy distribution of function can have complex downstream consequences, subjecting some areas to disprop...
Presentation
Full-text available
In this study, we assess how landscape attributes can potentially influence the first step of top-down control by modifying the distribution of predation on a keystone herbivore. We hypothesize that if control occurs at habitat scale, then certain landscape attributes can be more prone to predation than others. Additionally, if landscape attributes...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A quantitative model for the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus in the shallow macrophyte ecosystems of the NW Mediterranean (macroalgal dominated rocky bottoms and Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadows) was developed using size-structured matrices. This sea urchin is responsible for important ecosystem shifts especially in rocky substrates where by ov...
Poster
Full-text available
Habitat complexity plays an important role in determining how ecological processes work in the dynamics of benthic populations. This fact is especially important for species that can be found in different habitats and so if they are key organisms. The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus has been defined as a key species in Mediterranean ecosystems whe...
Data
The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus is of the most important herbivores in Mediterranean shallow ecosystems. Seagrass meadows of Posidonia oceanica and macroalgal communities on rocky reefs are the main habitats of this species. As keystone species it can drive ecosystem shifts when the population is out of control, turning a fleshy erect algae sy...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
En numerosas ocasiones, el alumnado percibe la existencia de contenidos que podrían ser tratados de manera transversal entre asignaturas. Sin embargo, la implantación de la transversalidad exige más que un esfuerzo en la coordinación de las asignaturas participantes. Tanto la parte de contenido que pueda ser complementario como la planificación tem...
Chapter
Full-text available
RESUMEN Esta red tiene como objetivo principal la elaboración de acciones conjuntas y propuestas prácticas con el objeto de contribuir a una mejor conexión y coherencia disciplinar entre áreas de la titulación de Ciencias del Mar. En concreto, esta red coordina las acciones conjuntas en las asignaturas del área de Estadística y de Biología Marina d...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Human action alters global environmental conditions at unprecedented rates, including ocean acidification and warming. Marine macrophytes contribute to climate regulation but information concerning their capacity to mitigate environmental change is still limited. The EU-funded SHIFT2SOLVE project addresses this knowledge gap by quantifying macrophytes' capacity to buffer environmental change in the present and in the future. The project forecasts the resilience of macrophytes as a tipping element by studying species acclimatisation to future environmental conditions. Additionally, drones and machine learning will be used to identify ecosystem contractions. This interdisciplinary project mixes surveys along natural gradients of temperature and ocean acidification (CO2 vents), manipulative experiments, genetic analyses and mathematical modelling to understand and preserve the resilience of the Earth System.
Project
https://www.coastfrag.org/ COASTFRAG’s primary objective is to resolve how the pressure of habitat fragmentation and loss impacts the species composition, structure and ecological function of intertidal seaweed communities while also experiencing multiple pressures caused by climate change (increased temperature, reduced water quality, higher rate of storm events, migration of species) and human activities (pollution). The data will feed into models to assess seaweed communities, today and under future climate, providing robust predictions to support decision makers and other stakeholders. COASTFRAG will perform field studies in four European regions selected to cover different temperature and water quality regimes: the Norwegian Sea, the Baltic Sea (Estonia), the Scottish Atlantic Ocean (UK) and the Mediterranean Sea (Spain). The project was funded by the Research Council of Norway, under grant agreement 314314, titled "COASTFRAG - Impact of habitat fragmentation and loss on coastal ecosystems: implications for sustainable management under climate change"
Project
Underwater macroalgal forests are among the most important ecosystems in our oceans. Their fronds and branches create a rich canopy, which harbors a diversity of species that are critical to nearshore trophic networks. Additionally, macroalgal forests offer a wide range of goods and services to populations living on the coast. They help ensure high water quality, provide refuge to species of commercial interest and are an important tourist attraction for divers, to list just a few of their critical functions. Macroalgal forests face a growing threat and we may be losing them at a rapid rate. One of the reasons for this loss is overgrazing effect by sea urchin herbivores. Normally, sea urchins would be naturally controlled by predatory fish, but with rampant overfishing, populations of sea urchins can grow to outbreak proportions allowing them to completely overgraze underwater forests. In addition, some areas (such as the Eastern Mediterranean) have suffered major losses of macroalgal forests because of herbivorous fish that enter through the Suez Canal. To add to these threats, other factors, like heat waves (that are increasing with climate change) can also cause dramatic collapses of these precious underwater forests. As a result, areas that were once abundant macroalgal forests are being rapidly replaced by underwater deserts – barrens – dominated by overgrazed rocks rather than macroalgae. These alternate habitats are very poor, low productive ecosystems with very little biodiversity. A group of researchers from different institutions have joint efforts to study the collapse of the underwater macroalgal forests and the expansion of barrens. In particular, we are interested in understanding what characterises these new barrens in order to isolate the factors that determine their creation. We also believe that monitoring already existing deserts is essential to prevent and predict the creation of new barrens along the coastline and will help us evaluate the possibilities of recovering lost underwater forests. For this reason, we launched a citizen science project within the www.seawatchers.org platform to discover the barrens worldwide. We need help in identifying new barrens to monitor. Barrens are areas where the bare rock is completely clean of all erect algal cover and is typically covered over with encrusting algae. How big these bare areas are, depends on the pressure the ecosystem receives but it normally ranges in sizes from several square meters to large expansions of hundreds of square meters. If you spot a barren, you can make a valuable contribution to this study, and to the conservation of macroalgal forests. All we need is information on the position of the barren (its GPS coordinates), the depth at which you saw it, and a photograph. If you see sea urchins or fish around the barren, please note them down, because it is very relevant information. Sea urchins and other herbivores are key species in generating and maintaining underwater deserts. www.seawatchers.org for more information