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Jorad de Vries

Jorad de Vries
ETH Zurich | ETH Zürich · Department of Environmental Systems Science

PhD

About

15
Publications
3,100
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138
Citations
Introduction
My research interest lies in the use of functional-structural plant modelling to study how plants interact with each other and with their environment on eco-evolutionary scales.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
The ‘holy grail’ of trait-based ecology is to predict the fitness of a species in a particular environment based on its functional traits, which has become all the more relevant in the light of global change. However, current ecological models are ill-equipped for this job: they rely on statistical methods and current observations rather than the m...
Preprint
The “holy grail” of trait-based ecology is to predict the fitness of a species in a particular environment based on its functional traits, which has become all the more relevant in the light of global change. However, current ecological models are ill-equipped to predict ecological responses to novel conditions due to their reliance on statistical...
Preprint
Full-text available
South America is home to the highest freshwater fish biodiversity on Earth. The hotspot of species richness is located in the western Amazon Basin, and richness decreases downstream along the Amazon River towards the mouth at the Atlantic coast, which contradicts the positive relationship between stream size and biodiversity that is commonly observ...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies show that the variation in root functional traits can be explained by a two-dimensional trait framework, containing a 'collaboration' axis in addition to the classical fast-slow 'conservation' axis. This collaboration axis spans from thin and highly branched roots that employ a 'do-it-yourself' strategy to thick and sparsely branched...
Article
Full-text available
Plants compete with their neighbours for limiting resources such as light and nitrogen, which can promote competitive ability at the expense of other functions such as chemical defence against insect herbivory. This trade-off is strongly influenced by dynamic interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. Yet, understanding how these interactions in...
Article
The root economics spectrum (RES) hypothesis predicts that fast‐growing tree species have short‐lived roots with high specific root length (SRL) to allow rapid resource uptake, and opposite trait expressions for slow‐growing species. Yet, the mixed support for this hypothesis suggests that trees can adopt alternative strategies to increase resource...
Data
Figure S1. The relative increase in seed production (%) for plants that regulate leaf‐level defence by R:FR when competing against plants that distribute defence homogeneously over the canopy (blue: increase in fitness, red decrease in fitness) (scenario 3). Left panel: strategies that compromise total defence investment by suppressing defence in l...
Article
Full-text available
Plants balance the allocation of resources between growth and defence to optimise fitness in a competitive environment. Perception of neighbour detection cues, such as a low ratio of red to far‐red radiation (R:FR), activates a suite of shade‐avoidance responses that include stem elongation and upward leaf movement, while simultaneously downregulat...
Article
Full-text available
Plants defend themselves against diverse communities of herbivorous insects. This requires an investment of limited resources, for which plants also compete with neighbours. The consequences of an investment in defence are determined by the metabolic costs of defence as well as indirect or ecological costs through interactions with other organisms....
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Plants usually compete with neighbouring plants for resources such as light as well as defend themselves against herbivorous insects. This requires investment of limiting resources, resulting in optimal resource distribution patterns and trade-offs between growth- and defence-related traits. A plant's competitive success is de...
Article
Plants downregulate their defences against insect herbivores upon impending competition for light. This has long been considered a resource trade-off, but recent advances in plant physiology and ecology suggest this mechanism is more complex. Here we propose that to understand why plants regulate and balance growth and defence, the complex dynamics...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Roots acquire resources essential to tree growth, but are still considered a black box. In this project, I study root trait variation within and across tree species, and their interactions with aboveground traits, to determine their integrated effect on tree growth.