Jone L. Pearce

Jone L. Pearce
University of California, Irvine | UCI · Merage School of Business

About

73
Publications
30,988
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10,307
Citations
Citations since 2016
5 Research Items
3725 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500

Publications

Publications (73)
Article
We address the effects of secrecy in organizational policy enforcement. First, the legal literature that explains why court proceedings are open is summarized: openness more effectively holds decision makers and claimants accountable for truthfulness and unbiased decisions, demonstrates that the rich or powerful have not bought off the weak, suppor...
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Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the cultural concept of power distance to test whether or not culture-practice fit or universal supervisory practices are associated with team collaboration, innovation, current, and future team performance. This test is possible because power distance is conceptually deconstructed and scales devel...
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In this Introduction to the Special Topic Forum on Management Theory and Social Welfare, we first provide an overview of the motivation behind the special issue. We then highlight the contributions of the six articles that make up this forum and identify some common themes. We also suggest some reasons why social welfare issues are so difficult to...
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Employee performance often moves in lockstep with job satisfaction. Using the 2015 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, we have identified important and common management and labor needs across more than 80 federal agencies. Drawing on the vast trove of organizational science research that examines the effects of organizational designs and processes...
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Using an inductive theory-development study, a field experiment, and a longitudinal field test, we examine early-stage entrepreneurial investment decision making under conditions of extreme uncertainty. Building on existing literature on decision making and risk in organizations, intuition, and theories of entrepreneurial financing, we test the eff...
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Jones and Stout (2015) have made one claim that I would like to correct: There is substantial quantitative (and observational) research on the workplace and organizational performance effects of nepotism and cronyism. That these authors have missed this research is understandable; the research is not in traditional industrial and organizational (I-...
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This commentary notes that the authors of the Special Issue propose that organization design knowledge will be more actionable if it is created in collaboration with the organization’s members. I draw attention to a risk in the co-creation of design knowledge: increasing the politicization of the already politically fraught process of organizationa...
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Full-text available
We propose and test a new theory explaining glass-ceiling bias against nonnative speakers as driven by perceptions that nonnative speakers have weak political skill. Although nonnative accent is a complex signal, its effects on assessments of the speakers' political skill are something that speakers can actively mitigate; this makes it an important...
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We propose and test an argument in which the well-documented skew in supervisory performance appraisal ratings toward those with the same demography as themselves is better explained by the status contests than the reigning theory of homophily. We conduct the test in a field study of 358 supervisor–subordinate dyads in 10 organizations, using hiera...
Article
We propose and test an argument in which the well-documented skew in supervisory performance appraisal ratings toward those with the same demography as themselves is better explained by the status contests than the reigning theory of homophily. We conduct the test in a field study of 358 supervisor-subordinate dyads in 10 organizations, using hiera...
Article
A close look at textbooks helps to illustrate that we do not now translate research into practice in our teaching. There are two areas in which our textbooks fail: by too often reporting as research evidence information for which there is no reliable supporting scholarship, and by undermining the field by persisting in wasting scarce space (and stu...
Article
List of figures List of tables List of contributors Foreword Preface 1. Introduction: the power of status Jone L. Pearce Part I. How Status Differences are Legitimated: 2. Divergence in status evaluation: theoretical implications for a social construction view of status building Bilian Ni Sullivan and Daniel Stewart 3. Maintaining but also changing...
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We draw attention to two changes in management research over the past 25 years: more focus on the different contexts that constrain management action, and applications of management knowledge to non‐business societal challenges. There has been much speculation but little comparative empirical research on how government quality affects what managers...
Book
People go to extraordinary lengths to gain and defend their status. Those with higher status are listened to more, receive more deference from others, and are perceived as having more power. People with higher status also tend to have better health and longevity. In short, status matters. Despite the importance of status, particularly in the workpl...
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We review and integrate existing research from organization theory, strategy, organizational behavior, economics, sociology and political science on the effects of governments on organization and management, with a focus on how governing ideology and government capability influence independent organizations’ forms, strategies, and their participant...
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A particularly ethnocentric theory-procedural justice-is placed within a larger theoretical context drawn from theories of comparative institutions. All of the hypotheses (tested in a sample of 1604 engineers and managers in Lithuanian and American electronics companies) were supported: (a) Employees in the "neo-traditional" political economy perce...
Article
It is argued that teaching is more important to shared understanding of management and organizations than scholars acknowledge. Teaching has been ignored in discussions of scholars' intellectual enterprise, in part, because of a practicality that violates Romantic Era ideals of intellectuals as otherworldly and pure. Yet teachers in conversation wi...
Article
There is a great gap in wealth among people of different nations. Millions in rich countries have comfort and affluence far beyond what anyone could have imagined two centuries ago, while those in poor nations live in unconscionable pov- erty and insecurity. What is more, our widespread mutual knowledge of these differences challenges us both moral...
Article
Both Pearce and Molm have conducted research in interpersonal trust. Here we apply their work to international business by deriving hypotheses from their work, some compatible, some conflicting. We test them with data from managers in China, the United States, Hong Kong and Thailand using measures from the World Bank, World Competitiveness Report,...
Article
Two new concepts, employees' Expectations of Organizational Mobility (EOM) and Workplace Social Inclusion (WSI), were developed in part from the burgeoning literature on social capital. Two independent tests of the hypotheses in two different organizations found that the greater employees' EOM, the lower their WSI, which in turn was associated with...
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Contents: A.P. Brief, J.P. Walsh, D. Denison, Managing Organizational Change in Transition Economies. Part I: Rethinking the Organizational Environment. L.A. Keister, Insider Lending and Economic Transition: The Structure, Function, and Performance Impact of Finance Companies in Chinese Business Groups. D. Guthrie, The Emergence of Market Practices...
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A decade ago communism in Europe collapsed, with ensuing political and economic transformations that continue. These transformations have been important to applied psychology. One reason certainly is that these changes could be expected to have profound psychological effects on those struggling through them. Established routines were demolished as...
Article
An analysis of the role of a respected social standing, or status, provides insights into the ways that globalization affects leaders' decisions to undertake organizational change. The review indicates that attaining high status entails advantages, with evidence that many will seek to attain and hold respected positions of social standing. Illustra...
Article
En matiere de sociologie des organisations, l'A. plaide pour moins de debats epistemologiques et methodologiques et pour davantage de recherche sur les effets des gouvernements sur les organisations, ainsi que sur le role du statut dans le comportement organisationnel
Article
Many employees in the world are evaluated and rewarded at work based on who they are ("particularism") rather than based on impersonal judgments of their performance ("universalism"). Yet the field of organizational behavior has been virtually silent on how employees react to workplaces dominated by particularism. In an effort to understand the rol...
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We present a problem-centered organizing framework of trust, in which prominent conceptualizations oi trust and distrust from the organizational and allied social sciences are categorized based on the questions they attempt to answer. The framework we outline here is intended to complement earlier typologies by suggesting alternative strategies for...
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We present a problem-centered organizing framework of trust, in which prominent conceptualizations of trust and distrust from the organizational and allied social sciences are categorized based on the questions they attempt to answer. The framework we outline here is intended to complement earlier typologies by suggesting alternative strategies for...
Article
This paper reports findings from an exploratory study that addresses the question of whether or not measures of perceptual ‘gaps’ in organizational inducements contribute unique explanatory power above and beyond such familiar measures as employee job attitudes. Perceptions of inducements were obtained from both employees and representatives of the...
Article
This article describes four approaches to the employee-organization relationship, as defined from the employer's perspective. An empirical study of employees from ten companies found support for the basic hypothesis that employee responses differ under the four types of relationship. In general, employees performed better on core tasks, demonstrate...
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Full-text available
Interview data from China are used to test an argument that executives develop personal connections in societies with underdeveloped legal support for private businesses. In China, such connections are called guanxi. An underdeveloped legal framework makes private-company executives more dependent on guanxi than executives in state-owned or collect...
Article
Procedural justice is placed within a larger theoretical context developed from theories of comparative institutions. In a sample of Lithuanian and American electronics companies it was found that: (a) Employees in the "neotraditional" political economy perceived their organizations as less meritocratic than did their peers in the "modern" politica...
Article
A type of organizational reward system based on personal power is described and partially tested. The theory, developed from observations of Hungarian organizations, is grounded in theories of procedural justice and learned helplessness. Person-based organizational reward systems are characterized by highly valued rewards combined with personalisti...
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Analyses two Hungarian state-owned companies seeking to reorient themselves as their national economy changes from state-socialist to market-driven. These companies were selected from a larger longitudinal study because they reflected one Hungarian-directed successful implementation of revolutionary change and one previously unsuccessful adaptation...
Article
The political changes that have swept Hungary in the past few years have been truly revolutionary. However, its newly elected gov-emment has not begun comparably sweeping economic transforma-tions through privatization. When the state has played such a domi-nating role in the economy, privatization of state-owned companies must be the centerpiece t...
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Tested a model hypothesizing that task interdependence affects supervisor-reported extrarole behavior indirectly through employee felt responsibility. The model was supported by path analysis in a sample of 290 health-care and administrative employees in 2 hospitals. The results (1) demonstrate the importance of asymmetric felt responsibility to ex...
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What are the human resources management practices within communist and formerly communist companies? Many of the managers from capitalist countries forming joint ventures with state-owned enterprises in communist and formerly communist countries have only superficial ideas about these enterprises' human resources management practices and their effe...
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The work of Max Weber (1947) on “traditional authority” forms the basis for a theoretical analysis of resource allocation decisions in radical-product innovative organizations. Decisions to support particular projects must be made on arational criteria, because radical product innovation destroys existing competencies and is not subject to economic...
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Investigated the attitudinal impacts of receiving formal performance appraisal feedback. Based on the suggestion that the feedback that one is "satisfactory" will be disconfirming for many feedback recipients, it was hypothesized that attitudes toward the performance appraisal systems and organizational commitment will decrease and remain lower for...
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Citizen advisory boards are important to non-profit and governmental organiza tions, yet these boards face fundamental problems of ambiguous responsibilities and limited board member commitment. In the present paper a model of these proposi tions is developed and tested. Board performance is operationalized as productivity and board impact, and is...
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We propose that employer-employee exchanges can be characterized by four contradictory types of normative expectations for the appropriate distribution of rewards: profit maximization, equity, equality, need. We expand on Williamson's (1975) argument that intrafirm transactions are characterized by normative expectations different from those in mar...
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This paper provides an historical review of coalitions in organizations and presents key issues that must be confronted if research on coalitions is to contribute to an understanding of intraorganizational dynamics. Included are: an explicit definition of a coalition within an organization, consideration of how the organizational context differs fr...
Article
Data were collected from members of 8 organizations: volunteer- and employee-staffed newspapers, poverty relief agencies, family planning clinics, and fire departments. It was expected that volunteers would report greater intrinsic, social, and service motivation; greater job satisfaction; less intent to leave; it was also expected that their activ...
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Merit pay for the federal employees is a controversial personnel program that bases compensation of grades 13-15 supervisors and managers on their rated performance. Under the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, merit pay was implemented concurrently with a new, untested, objectives-based performance appraisal system. The motivational model of behavi...
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A merit pay pool consists of individuals who are grouped together for the purpose of making merit pay computations. This paper investigates the consequences of variations in merit-pay-pool design and management for the linkage between performance and pay.
Article
Theoretical development of the concept of role ambiguity and empirical research on this concept have proceeded fairly independently of one another. Empirical work has confounded role ambiguity with both job dissatisfaction and formalization. A new model of ambiguity is offered, emphasizing unpredictability, rather than information deficiency. This...
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The effects of changes in the motivational properties of jobs on work attitudes and behaviors were assessed in a quasi-experimental design. A number of clerical jobs in a metropolitan bank were redesigned because of a technological innovation. Changes were made without regard for the motivational characteristics of the jobs, and without cognizance...
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Tested the moderating effects of (a) employee growth need strength and (b) level of satisfaction with the work context on employee responses to enriched work. Data were collected from 201 employees who work on 25 jobs in a bank. Employees who had strong growth needs and also were satisfied with the work context (i.e., with their pay, job security,...

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