Jonathon J. Valente

Jonathon J. Valente
United States Geological Survey | USGS · Alabama Cooperative Fish And Wildlife Research Unit

PhD
I am a quantitative ecologist answering questions at the intersection of fundamental ecology and applied conservation.

About

28
Publications
8,717
Reads
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436
Citations
Introduction
My research identifies factors impacting the distributions and population dynamics for individual species and whole communities, then uses that information to identify populations of conservation concern and ultimately develop conservation and management actions. I am USGS scientist with a faculty appointment in the College of Forestry, Wildlife, and the Environment at Auburn University. Please visit my website to learn more about my work (https://www.jonathonvalente.com/).
Additional affiliations
April 2009 - April 2012
Engineer Research and Development Center - U.S. Army
Position
  • Avian Ecologist and Data Analyst
Education
September 2012 - June 2017
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Forest Ecosystems and Society
September 2012 - June 2017
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Statistics
August 2006 - April 2009
Louisiana State University
Field of study
  • Wildlife Ecology

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
1. Dynamic occupancy models are popular for estimating dynamic distribution rates (colonization and extinction) from repeated presence/absence surveys of unmarked animals. This approach assumes closure among repeated samples within primary periods, allowing estimation of dynamic rates between these periods. However, the impact of temporary emigrati...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The hypothesis that habitat fragmentation negatively influences biodiversity stems from island biogeography and metapopulation theory which predict negative impacts of decreasing patch size on richness and distribution patterns. Empirical support of this idea is weak in terrestrial systems, though tests of fragmentation effects are typically c...
Article
Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the hypothesis that forest fragmentation sensitivity-affected by avoidance of habitat edges-should be driven by historical exposure to, and therefore species' evolutionary respo...
Article
Conspecific presence can indicate the location or quality of resources, and animals settling near conspecifics often gain fitness benefits. This can result in adaptive conspecific attraction during breeding habitat selection as demonstrated in numerous terrestrial, territorial birds. There is growing interest in using simulated conspecific social c...
Article
Full-text available
Protecting biodiversity while sustaining agricultural production is one of our greatest modern challenges. The dominant conservation paradigm in tropical coffee-growing regions involves land-sharing, wherein wildlife-friendly shade trees are integrated into plantations. Meanwhile, the value of land-sparing approaches that combine intensified farmin...
Article
Full-text available
The factors favoring the evolution of certain cognitive abilities in animals remain unclear. Social learning is a cognitive ability that reduces the cost of acquiring personal information and forms the foundation for cultural behavior. Theory predicts the evolutionary pressures to evolve social learning should be greater in more social species. How...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals that disperse long distances from their natal site must select breeding patches with no prior knowledge of patch suitability. Despite decades of theoretical studies examining which cues dispersing individuals should use to select breeding patches, few empirical studies have tested the predictions of these theories at spatial scales rele...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat selection decisions can impact individual fitness and ultimately scale up to mediate population dynamics. Understanding how birds select habitat is thus critical for discerning the biological processes structuring populations and for developing conservation strategies, particularly for species in decline. Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus mar...
Article
Full-text available
Research hypotheses have been a cornerstone of science since before Galileo. Many have argued that hypotheses (1) encourage discovery of mechanisms, and (2) reduce bias-both features that should increase transferability and reproducibility. However, we are entering a new era of big data and highly predictive models where some argue the hypothesis i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research hypotheses have been a cornerstone of science since before Galileo. Many have argued that hypotheses (1) encourage discovery of mechanisms, and (2) reduce bias – both features that should increase transferability and reproducibility. However, we are entering a new era of big data and highly predictive models where some argue the hypothesis...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species can have disastrous ecological consequences, and management is often required to control these invasions and mitigate the damage. Yet in many systems, biological invaders can serve critical ecological roles, particularly where they have been long-established or effectively replaced functionally similar native species. In such cases...
Article
Full-text available
Context Theory predicts that movement limitation due to landscape fragmentation can reduce population viability. Understanding how landscape heterogeneity influences movement is thus critical for testing theory and developing conservation strategies. Consequently, studies are needed that link movement data with landscape features influencing disper...
Article
Full-text available
 Tropical biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions have become heavily eroded through habitat loss. Animal-mediated pollination is required in more than 94% of higher tropical plant species and 75% of the world’s leading food crops, but it remains unclear if corridors avert deforestation-driven pollination breakdown in fragmented tropical l...
Article
1.Occupancy models are employed in species distribution modeling to account for imperfect detection during field surveys. While this approach is popular in the literature, problems can occur when estimating the model parameters. In particular, the maximum likelihood estimates can exhibit bias and large variance for datasets with small sample sizes,...
Article
Full-text available
Riparian systems in the western United States provide essential stopover habitat to en-route migrant birds, and there is concern that the invasion and dominance of saltcedar (Tamarix) in many areas may inhibit use by some species. However, evidence from recent studies is challenging the widely held belief that invasive plants universally reduce hab...
Article
Automated sound broadcast systems have been used to address a variety of ecological questions, and show great potential as a management tool. Such systems need to be reliable because treatments are often applied in the absence of a human observer and system failure can cause methodological ambiguity. During the breeding seasons of 2012 and 2013, we...
Article
Full-text available
Riparian systems in the western United States provide important habitat for bird communities during all times of the year. In recent decades, invasive plants, such as Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), have achieved broad distribution and local dominance in many western riparian areas, raising concerns over the loss of ecological function with...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The TernCOLONY simulation model is an individual-based model of Least Tern reproduction that was developed to better understand how reservoir operations (and other management activities) affect Least Tern breeding populations on large rivers. This document provides practical guidance for those wishing to implement this model in a new region. Specif...
Article
Many secretive marsh bird (SMB) species nest within rice fields, yet in most regions we do not understand the extent to which these birds use such habitats. In the summers of 2007 and 2008, we investigated summer use of rice fields by SMBs in north- east Louisiana and evaluated the local (within 100 m) and landscape (within 1 km) habitat characteri...
Article
For decades, researchers have successfully used ground-based surveys to understand localized spatial and temporal patterns in stopover habitat use by migratory birds. Recent technological advances with WSR-88D radar now allow such investigations on much broader spatial scales. Both methods are assumed to accurately quantify patterns in migrant bird...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this technical note is to summarize published research and describe the state of the science on activities that cause disturbances to birds found proximal to Corps of Engineers (Corps) projects, factors that influence bird response to disturbance, the ramifications of disturbances on individual birds and communities, and appropriate...
Article
Populations of many North American secretive marsh birds (SMBs) have declined in recent decades, partially as a function of wetland loss. Protecting and restoring appropriate habitat for these species is contingent upon understanding the habitat features they utilize. We investigated breeding distributions of SMBs in northeast Louisiana at 118 wetl...
Article
Periodical cicadas emerge from below ground every 13 or 17 years in North American forests, with individual broods representing the synchronous movement of trillions of individuals across geographic regions. Due to predator satiation, most individuals escape predation, die, and become deposited as detritus. Some of this emergent biomass falls into...
Article
Full-text available
Periodical cicadas emerge from below ground every 13 or 17 years in North American forests, with individual broods representing the synchronous movement of trillions of individuals across geographic regions. Due to predator satiation, most individuals escape predation, die, and become deposited as detritus. Some of this emergent biomass falls into...

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