Jonathan N. Stea

Jonathan N. Stea
The University of Calgary | HBI · Department of Psychology

PhD RPsych

About

18
Publications
5,652
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683
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
September 2008 - present
The University of Calgary

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Gambling disorders, including pathological gambling and problem gambling, have received increased attention from clinicians and researchers over the past three decades since gambling opportunities have expanded around the world. This Seminar reviews prevalence, causes and associated features, screening and diagnosis, and treatment approaches. Gambl...
Article
Full-text available
Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to alleviate symptoms of a wide range of physical and mental health conditions. Regular between-session practice of mindfulness meditation is among the key factors proposed to produce the therapeutic benefits of mindfulness-based programs. This article reviews the mindfulness intervention literature w...
Article
Research has generally demonstrated that the discounting of delayed rewards is associated with severity of addictive behaviour. Less clear, however, is the relative strength of the relation for specific addictive behaviours. University students (N=218) completed a computerized delay discounting task for hypothetical monetary rewards, and gambling,...
Article
Background Shared decision-making (SDM) is an approach to clinical decision-making that includes patients' values and preferences during health-related decisions. Previous research suggests that SDM may be beneficial in the treatment of substance use disorders; however, the impact of SDM in the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) remains unclear...
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Background: Increasing understanding of the pathways and processes of recovery from cannabis use disorder may help in designing effective and attractive interventions to promote recovery. We report insights from individuals who had successfully recovered from cannabis use disorder with a variety of pathways. Recovered individuals describe their pe...
Article
Introduction The Marijuana Problems Scale (MPS) is a widely-used self-report measure of cannabis-related negative consequences that has a past three-month reporting window. This report describes the psychometric characteristics of a lifetime version (MPS-L). Methods As part of a larger study, 119 individuals who had recovered from cannabis use dis...
Article
Little is known about whether recovery from one addiction is associated with increased or decreased risk of subsequent other addictions. This study explored self-reported increases and decreases in other substance use among individuals who have recovered from cannabis use disorder. Media recruitment was used to obtain a sample of 119 individuals wi...
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Depression is a highly prevalent and debilitating mental health condition. Evidence suggests that there is a widening gap between the demand for and availability of effective treatments. As such, there is a vast need for the development and dissemination of accessible and affordable treatments for depression. In the past decade, there has been a pr...
Article
The present study of recovery from cannabis use disorders was undertaken with 2 primary objectives that address gaps in the literature. The first objective was to provide an exploratory portrait of the recovery process from cannabis use disorders, comparing individuals who recovered naturally with those who were involved in treatment. The second ob...
Chapter
Conceptualizing, diagnosing, and treating behavioral or process addictions (addictions to nondrug activities, such as gambling, sex, Internet use and gaming, eating, shopping, work, and exercise) have proven to be conceptually complex. As a means of addressing this complexity, we adopt a syndrome model of addiction, which views the disorder of addi...
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The present study examined the nature and impact of participant goal selection (abstinence versus moderation) in brief motivational treatment for pathological gambling via secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial. The results demonstrated that the pattern of goal selection over time could be characterized by both fluidity and stability...
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Although there is an extensive literature on the effects of depression and dysphoria on memory accuracy, few studies have examined the effects of depression or dysphoria on false memory. This study used the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm (Roediger and McDermott in J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 21:803–814, 1995) to look for evidence of a mood cong...
Article
The link between lack of control and illusory pattern perception in gambling and cannabis use disorders is important to understand because the role of cognitive distortions as etiological risk factors in the development and maintenance of these disorders remains unclear. In this study, undergraduate students are categorized into five severity group...
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This paper articulates Sigmund Freud‟s conceptualization of the social world by surveying and critically examining four of his major sociological works: Civilized‟ Sexual Morality and Modern Nervous Illness (Freud, 1908/1991b), Totem and Taboo (Freud, 1913/1946), The Future of An Illusion (Freud, 1927/1991d), and Civilization and Its Discontents (F...
Article
This review presents the theoretical model, evidence base, and theoretical and methodological issues for seven treatment approaches to gambling disorders: 1) psychoanalytic and psychodynamic treatments, 2) Gamblers Anonymous, 3) behavioural treatments, 4) cognitive and cognitive-behavioural therapies, 5) brief, motivational, and self-directed inter...
Chapter
Full-text available
Alcohol problems can be broadly defined as negative consequences that people experience as a result of their use of alcohol. People may drink alcohol for a number of reasons: to promote feelings of relaxation, to increase feelings of sociability, to elevate mood, to conform to social expectations, or to reduce feelings of stress (Anonymous, 2000)....

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