Jonathan Cole

Jonathan Cole
Bournemouth University | BU · Department of Psychology

MA, MSc, DM, FRCP

About

167
Publications
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3,661
Citations

Publications

Publications (167)
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents results from the first survey of training and education undertaken by the Europe-Middle East-Africa (EMEAC), the Latin America (LAC) and the Asia-Oceania (AOC) Chapters of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology (IFCN). The survey was conducted initially by the EMEAC in 2012 and updated in 2016, 2019, and 2020....
Article
Havi Carel suggested that to ‘fully understand illness it also has to be studied as a lived experience … [in its] existential, ethical and social dimensions’. This paper focuses on empirical work with those with Möbius syndrome on face perception and its implications, on their resilience and on their first person experiences. Möbius is characterize...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of chronically deafferented participants have illuminated how regaining some motor control after adult-onset loss of proprioceptive and touch input depends heavily on cognitive control. In this study we contrasted the performance of one such man, IW, with KS, a woman born without any somatosensory fibres. We postulated that her life-long ab...
Article
Full-text available
The degree to which mental representations of the body can be established and maintained without somatosensory input remains unclear. We contrast two “deafferented” adults, one who acquired large fibre sensory loss as an adult (IW) and another who was born without somatosensation (KS). We compared their responses to those of matched controls in thr...
Article
Full-text available
Previous work has highlighted the role of haptic feedback for manual dexterity, in particular for the control of precision grip forces between the index finger and thumb. It is unclear how fine motor skills involving more than just two digits might be affected, especially given that loss of sensation from the hand affects many neurological patients...
Article
Full-text available
When navigating in a spatial environment or when hearing its description, we can develop a mental model which may be represented in the central nervous system in different coordinate systems such as an egocentric or allocentric reference frame. The way in which sensory experience influences the preferred reference frame has been studied with a part...
Article
Full-text available
It is uncertain how vision and proprioception contribute to adaptation of voluntary arm movements. In normal participants, adaptation to imposed forces is possible with or without vision, suggesting that proprioception is sufficient; in participants with proprioceptive loss (PL), adaptation is possible with visual feedback, suggesting that proprioc...
Article
Full-text available
There is a continuing debate about control of voluntary movement, with conflicted evidence about the balance between control of movement vectors (amplitude control) that implies knowledge of the starting position for accuracy, and equilibrium point or final position control, that is independent of the starting conditions. We tested wrist flexion an...
Article
When lifting novel objects, individuals' fingertip forces are influenced by a variety of cues such as volume and apparent material. This means that heavy-looking objects tend to be lifted with more force than lighter-looking objects, even when they weigh the same amount as one another. Expectations about object weight based on visual appearance als...
Article
Full-text available
Humans can remarkably adapt their motor behavior to novel environmental conditions, yet it remains unclear which factors enable us to transfer what we have learned with one limb to the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that interlimb transfer of sensorimotor adaptation is determined by environmental conditions but also by individual characterist...
Article
Proprioceptive information arises from a variety of channels, including muscle, tendon, and skin afferents. It tells us where our static limbs are in space and how they are moving. It remains unclear however, how these proprioceptive modes contribute to motor learning. Here, we studied a subject (IW) who has lost large myelinated fibres below the n...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Tactile spatial acuity is routinely tested in neurology to assess the state of the dorsal column system. In contrast, spatial acuity for pain is not assessed, having never been systematically characterized. More than a century after the initial description of tactile acuity across the body, we provide the first systematic whole-body mappi...
Article
Tactile spatial acuity is routinely tested in neurology to assess the state of the dorsal column system. In contrast, spatial acuity for pain is not assessed, having never been systematically characterised. More than a century after the initial description of tactile acuity across the body, we provide the first systematic whole-body mapping of spat...
Article
Intimacy usually involves the body. Its dependence on and the difficulties in transcending this are explored by discussing some of the problems those with neurological impairment have in this regard. These impairments are considered in relation to intimacy with one's own body, with others and with the world. Intimacy is also often expressed through...
Chapter
Full-text available
Although the importance of the face in communication is well-known, there has been little discussion of the ramifications for those who lack facial expression: individuals with facial paralysis such as Bell’s palsy and Möbius syndrome, and facial movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease. By examining the challenges experienced by these individua...
Conference Paper
This paper is synopsis of a recently proposed solution for treating patients who suffer from Phantom Limb Pain (PLP). The underpinning approach of this research and development project is based on an extension of "mirror box" therapy which has had some promising results in pain reduction. An outline of an immersive individually tailored environment...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report looks at the possible benefits and unintended consequences of intervening in the brain, and sets out an ethical framework to guide the practices of those involved in development, regulation, use and promotion of novel neurotechnologies. - See more at: http://nuffieldbioethics.org/project/neurotechnology/#sthash.VEQ6xFkd.dpuf
Article
Full-text available
Reverse simulation models of facial expression recognition suggest that we recognize the emotions of others by running implicit motor programmes responsible for the production of that expression. Previous work has tested this theory by examining facial expression recognition in participants with Möbius sequence, a condition characterized by congeni...
Data
Items in the expression imagery test. (DOCX)
Data
Items in the object imagery test. (DOCX)
Article
Disorders of the brain and its sensory organs have traditionally been associated with deficits in movement, perception, cognition, emotion and behaviour. It is, however, increasingly recognised that paradoxical enhancement of functioning may occur in some settings. This article provides a selective review of such phenomena - better-than-normal perf...
Article
Full-text available
Disorders of the brain and its sensory organs have traditionally been associated with deficits in movement, perception, cognition, emotion, and behavior. It is increasingly evident, however, that positive phenomena may also occur in such conditions, with implications for the individual, science, medicine, and for society. This article provides a se...
Article
Full-text available
Visual- and motor imagery rely primarily on perceptual and motor processes, respectively. In healthy controls, the type of imagery used to solve a task depends on personal preference, task instruction, and task properties. But how does the chronic loss of proprioceptive and tactile sensory inputs from the body periphery influence mental imagery? In...
Article
We are defined by our faces. They give identity but, equally importantly, reveal our moods and emotions through facial expression. So what happens when the face cannot move? This book is about people who live with Möbius Syndrome, which has as its main feature an absence of movement of the muscles of facial expression from birth. People with Möbius...
Article
Phantom sensations, that is, sensations perceived in a body part that has been lost, are a common consequence of accidental or clinical extremity amputations. Most amputation patients report a continuing presence of the limb, with some describing additional sensations such as numbness, tickling, or cramping of the phantom limb. The type, frequency,...
Article
Paradoxes abound in nature and in the realm of the human condition. Paradoxes have been evident in fields of science-from plant biology to human biology to physics-and in areas of human endeavour, ranging through political, literary and social activities. Paradoxes often represent instances where current knowledge may be deficient, and thus predict...
Article
Paradoxical findings relating to the human brain have implications for our understanding of the workings of the normal brain, and for how normal functioning may be enhanced. Paradoxical findings may also have implications for how we can prevent and detect brain disease, and how we may best repair and rehabilitate the damaged brain. The brain may be...
Article
Following the onset of facial palsy, physiotherapists routinely inspect the inside of the patient's mouth and cheek for complications such as ulceration or trauma. In several patients with complete facial nerve palsy, it was noticed that when the cheek was stretched there was subsequent spasm of the muscles of facial expression. This also occurred...
Article
Signals associated with the command the brain sends to muscles are thought to create the sensation of heaviness when we lift an object. Thus, as a muscle is weakened by fatigue or partial paralysis (neuromuscular blockade), the increase in the motor command needed to lift a weight is thought to explain the increasing subjective heaviness of the lif...
Book
The Paradoxical Brain focuses on a range of phenomena in clinical and cognitive neuroscience that are counterintuitive and go against the grain of established thinking. The book covers a wide range of topics by leading researchers, including: “Superior performance after brain lesions or sensory loss” Return to normal function after a second brain l...
Article
This paper introduces the background to the debate addressed by the papers of this Special Issue of Pragmatics & Cognition . Starting with a definition of consciousness it traces some ways in which the term is applied; from clinical medicine, where it relates somewhat crudely to responsiveness to external stimuli, to more cognitive and philosophica...
Article
Mutations in the gene encoding muscle-specific calpain 3 protease cause limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. Calpainopathy is characterised by progressive symmetrical atrophy of pelvic, scapular and trunk muscles with an elevated creatine kinase. Most patients develop symptoms in childhood and lose the ability to walk by the age of 40 years. We...
Chapter
When in 1833 Sir Charles Bell (1833) first described movement and position sense (which Sherrington was to term proprioception 60 or so years later), he immediately also saw that often we do not attend to movement. ‘… we use our limbs without being conscious, or at least, without any conception of the thousand parts which must conform to a single a...
Article
This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome (the congenital absence of facial expression). People with...
Book
We are defined by our faces. They give identity but, equally importantly, reveal our moods and emotions through facial expression. So what happens when the face cannot move? This book is about people who live with Möbius Syndrome, which has as its main feature an absence of movement of the muscles of facial expression from birth. People with Möbius...
Article
Although feed-forward mechanisms of grip force control are a prerequisite for skilled object manipulation, somatosensory feedback is essential to acquire, maintain, and adapt these mechanisms. Individuals with complete peripheral deafferentation provide the unique opportunity to study the function of the motor system deprived of somatosensory feedb...
Chapter
Full-text available
The history of early research on haptics in the United Kingdom is, to a large extent, the history of several great men, reflecting in part the relative small numbers engaged in research. There was a golden age for British neurology and neurophysiology at the turn of the 19th and 20th Centuries, before and during the First World War. After this the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Historically deafferentation has been seen in the context of a late effect of syphilis, (before the spirochaete’s effects were largely killed off by antibiotics, at least in Western societies). One of the consequences of the chronic late stage of the disease is atrophy of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, leading to loss of the tracts carrying...
Article
Full-text available
The importance of the face and facial expression in enactive intersubjectivity is explored by reference to the experience of those with Moebius Syndrome. This rare, congenital condition affects the brain stem, leading to a variety of impairments of which the cardinal ones are an absence of movement of the muscles of facial expression and an absence...
Article
Full-text available
No Abstract.
Article
The present study investigated the role of ideation and visual feedback, and their interaction in movement control in the absence of somatosensory feedback, with the hypothesis that visual imagery and internal visual models may play a crucial role in performance even without feedback. Two chronically deafferented participants, GL and IW, circled bi...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to recognize visually one's own movement is important for motor control and, through attribution of agency, for social interactions. Agency of actions may be decided by comparisons of visual feedback, efferent signals, and proprioceptive inputs. Because the ability to identify one's own visual feedback from passive movements is decrease...
Article
Studies of perception have focussed on sensation, though more recently the perception of action has, once more, become the subject of investigation. These studies have looked at acute experimental situations. The present paper discusses the subjective experience of those with either clinical syndromes of loss of movement or sensation (spinal cord i...
Article
Subjects estimated the time of intentions to perform an action, of the action itself, or of an auditory effect of the action. A perceptual attraction or binding effect occurred between actions and the effects that followed them. Judgements of intentions did not show this binding, suggesting they are represented independently of actions and their ef...
Article
Wittgenstein, despite being considered an analytical philosopher, has been quoted extensively by neurologists like Oliver Sacks. This paper explores how Wittgenstein, despite suggesting that science was antithetical to philosophy, made observations relevant to cognitive neuroscience. His work on the inner and the outer, the relation between languag...