Jonathan Eric Albo

Jonathan Eric Albo
Cornell University | CU · Department of Biomedical Engineering

Bachelor of Science

About

4
Publications
1,432
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55
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - May 2025
Cornell University
Position
  • PhD Student
July 2017 - present
Florida State University
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Different types of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) have been widely used to control food safety and quality. To develop an accurate and reproducible ELISA, false immunodetection results caused by non-specific binding (NSB) and cross-reaction must be prevented. During the case study of sandwich ELISA development for the detection of porci...
Article
Full-text available
Pericytes are a type of perivascular cells that surround endothelial cells of small blood vessels. In the brain, pericytes show heterogeneity depending on their position within the vasculature. As a result, pericyte interactions with surrounding endothelial cells, astrocytes, and neuron cells play a key role in a wide array of neurovascular functio...
Article
Full-text available
Routine identification of bark and ambrosia beetles is done using morphology. For people lacking the necessary taxonomic knowledge, proper identification of a novel specimen can be challenging and time consuming. This study compares the usefulness of four genetic markers (28S, EF-1a, ITS2, and COI) and five primer pairs (D2F1/D3R2, eflafor1/eflarev...
Article
Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can be used for the detection of trace amounts of pesticides in foods to ensure consumer safety. In this perspective, we highlighted the trends of SERS-based assays in pesticide detection and the various challenges associated with its selectivity, reproducibility, and non-specific binding. We also discusse...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Looking for any papers or suggestions on attaching a COOH group to a Fe3O4 particle coated in silica (via TEOS).
Question
I have been attempting to create Fe3O4 particles using the coprecipitation method using a 2:1 FeCl3:FeCl2 ratio. Today we used 0.1M FeCl3, 0.05M FeCl2 dissolved in 20 mL of water. This was stirred and 80mL of 1.5M NH4OH was added. This was heated to 80-85C and remained at this point for 1 hour. After the hour, we let the solution cool and noticed a defined separation between the particles and the supernatant. We mixed this solution and poured into a different tube which we magnetically decanted. After the first two washes the supernatant was clear, but then we combined the separate tubes we were using, the supernatant always contained particles and they wouldn't fully separate again. We tested the supernatant and it had very little separation of any particles. We were also expecting a particle size less than 20 nm according to multiple studies using TEM but we found a particle size of 597nm using DLS. We definitely had enough NH4OH this time, as previously we witnessed what happened with too little and did not receive the same results. I need them to fully separate and give me an accurate particle size because I plan to coat with TEOS and need to verify the particles were coated. Thank you so much!

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