Jonas Pontusson

Jonas Pontusson
University of Geneva | UNIGE · Department of Political Science and International Relations

PhD

About

120
Publications
39,008
Reads
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5,311
Citations
Citations since 2016
37 Research Items
2599 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Additional affiliations
July 2005 - July 2010
Princeton University
Position
  • Professor
July 1984 - June 2005
Cornell University
Position
  • Professor
Education
September 1979 - June 1986
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Political Science
September 1978 - September 1979
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Political Science
September 1973 - June 1978
Amherst College
Field of study
  • Political Science

Publications

Publications (120)
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper pools datasets on policy responsiveness to public opinion in Germany, the Nether-lands, Norway and Sweden. Following the empirical strategy set out by Gilens (2012), we show that the policy outputs correspond much better to the preferences of affluent citizens than to the preferences of low-and middle-income citizens in all four countrie...
Article
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This paper presents the results of a conjoint survey experiment in which Swiss citizens were asked to choose among parliamentary candidates with different class profiles determined by occupation, education, and income. Existing survey‐experimental literature on this topic suggests that respondents are indifferent to the class profiles of candidates...
Article
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This article explores the role of occupation, education and income on individuals’ perceptions of being politically represented. Based on ISSP surveys in 19 liberal democracies between 1996 and 2016 and a cross-national survey carried out in the mid-1970s, we analyse responses to the statement that ‘people like me do not have any say about what the...
Article
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Many studies of cross-national survey data find that union members are more likely to be supportive of redistributive policies than respondents who are not union members. Analysing British, German and Swedish survey data, this article demonstrates that the union membership effect on support for redistribution varies depending on the kinds of unions...
Article
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This article develops a framework for studying the politics of growth models. These, the authors posit, are sustained by ‘growth coalitions’ based in key sectors. Their members are first and foremost firms and employer associations, but fractions of labor are also included, if their interests do not impair the model’s functionality. There is no gua...
Preprint
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Focusing on the role of social class as a determinant of individuals’ perceptions of being politically represented, or having political voice, this paper analyses responses to a survey question that asks respondents whether they agree or disagree with the statement that «people like me don’t have any say about what the government does.» We draw on...
Chapter
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This chapter summarizes and elaborates on the “growth models perspective” proposed by Baccaro and Pontusson (2016). In addition, the chapter updates the previous analysis of post-Fordist growth trajectories in Germany, Italy, Sweden and the UK. With growth models operationalized in terms of the contributions of different components of aggregate dem...
Preprint
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Inequality and Politics is an online survey that was carried out in thirteen West European countries and the United States in 2019. The dataset includes representative samples of at least 2000 respondents per country. The survey probes citizens' perceptions of economic and political inequalities and their attitudes towards "inequality-correcting po...
Article
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Relying on post-election surveys, we analyze how class and union membership condition voters’ abandonment of mainstream Left parties and the alternatives chosen by former mainstream-Left voters in the period 2001–2015. Inspired by Przeworski and Sprague’s Paper Stones (1986), our analysis shows that Left parties face a trade-off between mobilizing...
Article
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Stefán Ólafsson, Mary Daly, Olli Kangas and Joakim Palme (eds) (2019), Welfare and Great Recession: A Comparative Study, Oxford: Oxford University Press, £65.00, pp. 352, hbk. - JONAS PONTUSSON
Preprint
Full-text available
Many analyses of cross-national survey data find that union members are more likely to be supportive of redistributive policies than respondents who are not union members. Analyzing British, German, and Swedish survey data, this paper demonstrates that the union membership effect on support for redistribution varies depending on the kinds of unions...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper seeks to develop a comprehensive analytical framework for studying the politics of economic growth by engaging with three literatures in comparative political economy: the literature on producer-group coalitions, the literature on electoral politics and constrained partisanship and, finally, the literature on the role of ideas. Drawing o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Relying on post-election surveys, this paper analyzes how class and union membership condition voters' abandonment of mainstream Left parties and the alternatives chosen by former mainstream-Left voters in the period 2001-15. Inspired by Przeworski and Sprague's Paper Stones (1986), our analysis shows that Left parties face a trade-off between mobi...
Research
Full-text available
This paper provides a historical overview of comparative political economy as an interdisciplinary field of study anchored in political science and focused on advanced capitalist states. We argue that this field of inquiry has reached an impasse and that a more sustained engagement with macroeconomics provides a way forward. Against this backdrop,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper provides an historical overview of comparative political economy as an interdisciplinary field of study anchored in political science and focused on advanced capitalist states. We argue that this field of inquiry has reached an impasse and that a more sustained engagement with macroeconomics provides a way forward. Against this backdrop,...
Research
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of a conjoint survey experiment in which Swiss citizens were asked to choose among parliamentary candidates distinguished by occupation, education, and income. Existing survey-experimental literature on this topic suggests that voters are indifferent to the class profiles of candidates or biased against candidates wi...
Article
Full-text available
The Fed, Finance, and Inequality in Comparative Perspective - Jonas Pontusson
Book
What are the relative merits of the American and European socioeconomic systems? Long-standing debates have heated up in recent years with the expansion of the European Union and increasingly sharp political and cultural differences between the United States and Europe. In Inequality and Prosperity, Jonas Pontusson provides a comparative overview o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Relying on post-election surveys, this paper analyzes how class and union membership condition voters’ abandonment of mainstream Left parties and the alternatives chosen by former mainstream-Left voters in the period 2001-14. Inspired by Przeworski and Sprague’s Paper Stones (1986), our analysis shows that Left parties face a trade-off between work...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have found that countries with union-administered unemployment insurance have higher rates of unionization than countries with state-administered unemployment insurance. With data going further back in history, this article demonstrates that the introduction of so-called “Ghent systems” had no effect on unionization rates. We argue tha...
Article
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Using data from the European Social Survey (2002–14), this article explores the effect of union membership on support for redistribution. The authors hypothesize that the wage-bargaining practices of unions promote egalitarian distributive norms, which lead union members to support redistribution, and that this effect is strongest among high-wage w...
Article
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This contribution explores common trends in inequality and redistribution across Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries from the late 1980s to 2013. Low-end inequality rises during economic downturns while rising top-end inequality is associated with economic growth. Most countries retreated from redistribution from...
Article
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This paper develops an analytical approach to comparative political economy that focuses on the relative importance of different components of aggregate demand—in the first instance, exports and household consumption—and dynamic relations among the “demand drivers” of growth. We illustrate this approach by comparing patterns of economic growth in G...
Article
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This article investigates fiscal policy responses to the Great Recession in historical perspective. It explores general trends in the frequency, size and composition of fiscal stimulus as well as the impact of government partisanship on fiscal policy outputs during the four international recessions of 1980–1981, 1990–1991, 2001–2002 and 2008–2009....
Article
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This article explores the implications of the OECD-wide decline of union density for earnings inequality and income redistribution by looking at aggregate (country-level) data. Over the period 1975–95, countries that experienced relatively large declines in union density also experienced relatively large increases in earnings inequality. In additio...
Article
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This article compares government responses to the Great Recession of 2008–2009 with government responses to recessions and other economic challenges in the period 1974–1982. We focus on five countries: France, Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Across these countries, we observe two broad shifts in crisis responses. First,...
Chapter
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The literature on the politics of inequality and redistribution in advanced democracies has become very large in recent years. This article focuses on several areas where important new arguments are being put forward. It reviews recent work on the interaction of unions and employers, the role of political parties and electoral institutions, and the...
Article
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The financial crisis that erupted on Wall Street in 2008 quickly cascaded throughout much of the advanced industrial world. Facing the specter of another Great Depression, policymakers across the globe responded in sharply different ways to avert an economic collapse. Why did the response to the crisis—and its impact on individual countries—vary so...
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Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson's Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer—And Turned Its Back on the Middle Class is both a work of political science and a contribution to broad public discussion of distributive politics. Its topic could not be more relevant to a US polity wracked by bitter partisan disagreements about taxes,...
Chapter
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Purpose – The goal of this chapter is to explore whether variation in the distribution of union members across the income distribution affects the role of unions in redistributive politics. Design/methodology/approach – The conceptual part of the study provides a theoretical motivation for disaggregating organized labor by income. The empirical par...
Article
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Against the current consensus among comparative political economists, we argue that inequality matters for redistributive politics in advanced capitalist societies, but it is the structure of inequality, not the level of inequality, that matters. Our theory posits that middle-income voters will be inclined to ally with low-income voters and support...
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Abstract will be provided by author.
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Why is it that some countries have witnessed significant increases in inequality since the 1960s while at the same time experiencing very little change in the way politics is conducted? And why is it that in other countries, where inequality has increased much less, the Left has become substantially more redistributive? The answer, the authors argu...
Article
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This paper explores temporal variation in partisan effects on social spending growth in OECD countries over the period 1971-2002. We argue that partisan effects are jointly conditioned by globalization and the mobilizational capacity of organized labour. We present three main empirical findings. First, we show that partisan effects increased from t...
Article
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Why is it that some countries have witnessed significant increases in inequality since the early 1970s while at the same time experiencing very little change in the way politics is conducted? And why is it that in other countries, where inequality has increased much less, the Left has become substantially more redistributive? The answer, we argue b...
Article
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This chapter focuses on the effects of income inequality on party politics in industrialized democracies. Having devoted a great deal of attention to the political determinants of income distribution in the 1990s, students of comparative political economy have recently begun to address how the distribution of income affects politics and, in particu...
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  This article examines a model of the domestic political economy of subjective employment insecurity in advanced industrial societies. Based on data on people's attitudes toward their job as well as levels of and kinds of social protection collected in 15 OECD countries, it shows that there are distinct manifestations of job insecurity that are af...
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For comments on a previous draft, I wish to thank Mary O’Sullivan, Michael Shalev and Bruce Western.
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Can egalitarianism itself contribute to growth? This political scientist looks at the recent success of the Nordic states and answers "yes." He also cites other characteristics that have made the Nordic economies work, not least their investment in education and policies to promote female employment.
Article
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A lberto Alesina and Edward Glaeser's recent book, Fighting Poverty in the US and Europe, exemplifies the recent incursion of economists into the domains of political science and sociology. In thinking about wel-fare states, economists have traditionally been interested in their effects on the distribution of income and, above all, their implicatio...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores temporal variation in partisan effects on social spending growth in OECD countries over the period 1971– 2002. We argue that partisan effects are jointly conditioned by globalization and the mobilizational capacity of organized labour. We present three main empirical findings. First, we show that partisan effects increased from...
Article
Full-text available
We use data from the Luxembourg Income Study to examine household market inequality, redistribution, and the relationship between market inequality and redistribution in affluent OECD countries in the 1980s and 1990s. We observe sizeable increases in market household inequality in most countries. This development appears to have been driven la...
Chapter
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This chapter critically examines the analytical foundations and some of the empirical claims of the Varieties-of-Capitalism (VoC) School of comparative political economy. Virtually, the entire field of comparative economy subscribes to the idea that capitalism takes on different institutional forms and, furthermore, that the institutional arrangeme...
Article
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Through a pooled cross-section time-series analysis of the determinants of wage inequality in sixteen OECD countries from 1973 to 1995, we explore how political-institutional variables affect the upper and lower halves of the wage distribution. Our regression results indicate that unionization, centralization of wage bargaining and public-sector em...