Jonas Meier

Jonas Meier
Universität Bern | UniBe · Department of Economics

About

2
Publications
124
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4
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
4 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.0

Publications

Publications (2)
Article
We assess the demand effects of discounts on train tickets issued by the Swiss Federal Railways, the so-called ‘supersaver tickets’, based on machine learning, a subfield of artificial intelligence. Considering a survey-based sample of buyers of supersaver tickets, we use causal machine learning to assess the impact of the discount rate on reschedu...
Preprint
Full-text available
We assess the demand effects of discounts on train tickets issued by the Swiss Federal Railways, the so-called `supersaver tickets', based on machine learning, a subfield of artificial intelligence. Considering a survey-based sample of buyers of supersaver tickets, we investigate which customer- or trip-related characteristics (including the discou...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
In order to analyze how physicians react to monetary incentives, we study the implication of a tariff scheme revision in Switzerland. The so-called TARMED tariff system regulates prices for all out-patient services (including drug dispensing) which are covered by mandatory health insurance. Starting from 1st of January 2018, the TARMED system was reformed with the goal to adjust the price for services which were deemed overpriced, to correct incentives for certain tariff points and to put more emphasis on intellectual rather than technical services. Using a physician-tariff point level dataset we will be able to exploit the quasi-exogenous change in the price structure to study physician behavior. We aim to shed more light on how physicians react to financial incentives, and whether the observed behavioral changes are consistent with the notion of supplier-induced demand. Further, it will be possible to judge whether the announced target of CHF 470 mio. savings was met. Finally, the results will be able to inform future policy changes and predict their implications.