Jon David Sweeney

Jon David Sweeney
Natural Resources Canada | NRCan · Canadian Forest Service, Atlantic Forestry Centre

PhD

About

793
Publications
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Introduction
Jon Sweeney is a research scientist at Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Atlantic Forestry Centre in Fredericton, New Brunswick. Jon studies the ecology and management of forest insect pests, specializing in wood borers and invasive species. His current projects include the development of improved tools for surveillance and early detection of invasive bark- and wood boring insects, and methods for survey and control of the invasive beech leaf-mining weevil.

Publications

Publications (793)
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Forty-two new provincial Coleoptera records are reported from New Brunswick (11), Nova Scotia (28), and Prince Edward Island (3) for the following 23 families: Carabidae, Staphylinidae, Buprestidae, Eucnemidae, Elateridae, Lycidae, Cantharidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Sphindidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Mordellidae, Ripiphoridae, Ten...
Article
In 2012-2013, we assessed the interactive effects of the cerambycid pheromones syn-2,3-hexanediol, 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one, and 3-hydroxyoctan-2-one on catches of bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in ethanol-baited multiple-funnel traps in north Georgia and South Carolina. We found that catches for nine of eleven species of ambrosi...
Article
Tetropium fuscum (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a Eurasian longhorn beetle and forest pest that first became invasive to Nova Scotia, Canada around 1990. In the time since its introduction, T. fuscum has spread only about 150 km from its point of introduction. In its invasive range, T. fuscum co-exists with its congener Tetropium cinnamopterum . Alt...
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Early detection of bark- and wood-boring beetles is critical to support the eradication of recently established populations in novel regions. Flight intercept traps baited with semiochemical lures are essential for surveillance and population monitoring of introduced insects. We present laboratory and field data to test potential improvements in tr...
Article
In 2016, we conducted three experiments to clarify the effects of 2,3-hexanediols isomers on trap catches of Neoclytus acuminatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). We also noted the effects of the isomers on trap catches of other cerambycids and associated species of predators and competitors. Catches of N. acuminatus in traps baited with ethanol +...
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Pest density-plant damage relationships are essential guides for decision-making in Integrated Pest Management. In this article, we established pest density-leaf damage relationships for the beech leaf-mining weevil, Orchestes fagi (L.) (formerly Rhynchaenus fagi , Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in its invasive range of Nova Scotia, Canada. Outbreaks o...
Article
We assess risks posed by oak wilt—a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Bretziella fagacearum. Though not currently found in Canada, our distribution models indicate that suitable climate conditions currently occur in southern Ontario for B. fagacearum and two of its main insect dispersal vectors, Colopterus truncatus and Carpophilus sayi. Climat...
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We assess risks posed by oak wilt—a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Bretziella fagacearum. Though not currently found in Canada, our distribution models indicate that suitable climate conditions currently occur in southern Ontario for B. fagacearum and two of its main insect dispersal vectors, Colopterus truncatus and Carpophilus sayi. Climat...
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Invasive alien species (IAS) are an important threat to forests. One of the best ways to manage potential IAS is through early detection and rapid response (EDRR) strategies. However, when dealing with IAS in forests, EU regulations are divided between phytosanitary regulations and IAS regulations. A version of EDRR for the former has been in place...
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• Tetropium gabrieli is native to the European Alps where it breeds in European larch and may be an important pest during drought periods by killing trees. It has spread to larch plantations in several European countries including Sweden. • In trapping studies conducted in Sweden, we tested whether T. gabrieli was attracted to E‐fuscumol, E,Z‐fuscu...
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The beech leaf-mining weevil, Orchestes fagi, is a common pest of European beech, Fagus sylvatica, and has recently become established in Nova Scotia, Canada where it similarly infests American beech, F. grandifolia. We collected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by F. grandifolia leaves at five developmental stages over one growing season...
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Bark and ambrosia beetles are commonly moved among continents within timber and fresh wood-packaging materials. Routine visual inspections of imported commodities are often complemented with baited traps set up in natural areas surrounding entry points. Given that these activities can be expensive, trapping protocols that attract multiple species s...
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Semiochemical-baited intercept traps are important tools used to collect information about the presence/absence and population dynamics of forest insects. The performance of these tools is influenced by trap location along both horizontal edge–interior and vertical understory–canopy gradients. Consequently, the development of survey and detection p...
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One-hundred-eleven new provincial and territorial Coleoptera records are reported from New Brunswick (64), Nova Scotia (20), Prince Edward Island (5), Quebec (14), Manitoba (3), British Columbia (3), and Yukon Territory (2) for the 26 following families: Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Staphylinidae, Scarabaeidae, Buprestidae, Eucnemidae, Elater...
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The paper presents the first records in Poland of Agrilus hastulifer (Ratzeburg, 1837) (Buprestidae). It is the 31st species of the genus Agrilus Curtis, 1825 recorded in the country. It was found in two locations in eastern (Białowieża Primeval Forest) and central Poland (Kampinos National Park). All data of the biology and economic significance o...
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The beech leaf-mining weevil, Orchestes fagi (L.), is native to Europe where it commonly attacks European beech. The weevil was discovered infesting American beech in Halifax and Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada in 2012, but anecdotal reports of defoliated beech in the Halifax area as early as 2006 suggest it established 5–10 years prior to...
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Longhorn beetles are among the most important groups of invasive forest insects worldwide. In parallel, they represent one of the most well‐studied insect groups in terms of chemical ecology. Longhorn beetle aggregation‐sex pheromones are commonly used as trap lures for specific and generic surveillance programs at points of entry and may play a ke...
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Influence of trap colour, type, deployment height, and a host volatile on monitoring Orchestes fagi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Nova Scotia, Canada–ERRATUM - Volume 152 Issue 1 - Joel T.L. Goodwin, Simon P. Pawlowski, Peter D. Mayo, Peter J. Silk, Jon D. Sweeney, N. Kirk Hillier
Article
Orchestes fagi (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a pest of beech trees ( Fagus sylvatica Linnaeus; Fagaceae) in Europe that has recently become established and invasive on American beech ( Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart) in Nova Scotia, Canada. We tested the effects of trap type, trap colour, trap height, and lure on the numbers of O. fagi captu...
Article
We investigated auditory signals and morphology of the stridulatory apparatus of the European beech leaf‐mining weevil, Orchestes fagi L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), an invasive herbivore now established in Nova Scotia, Canada, to determine their potential for enhancing survey tools to monitor the spread of the species in Canada. We recorded and d...
Article
In north-central Georgia, trap height affected catches of some species of bark and woodboring beetles (Coleoptera) in traps baited with lures used in surveillance programs to detect non-native forest insects. Traps were placed within the canopy and understory of mature oak trees (Quercus spp.) with collection cups placed 18-23 m above ground level...
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The aim of this work was to expand current knowledge on the species composition and distribution of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Białowieża Primeval Forest (BPF) based on research conducted in 2000–2018 and a literature review. The BPF is considered the best-preserved forest of the European lowland and is a reference point for all...
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Longhorn and jewel beetles are often moved intercontinentally within woody materials. The common use of hardwoods in solid wood-packaging requires e cient trapping protocols for broadleaf-associated species. We tested the e ect of lure (ethanol vs multi-lure), trap color (green vs purple), and trap height (understory vs canopy) on the longhorn and...
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Forests provide important ecosystem services, and the need for these services is expected to increase. Although disturbances are often important components of management plans for forest ecosystems, management efforts often target the prevention and mitigation of disturbances that threaten these services. Exotic insects are an increasingly importan...
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Exotic bark and wood-boring beetles [Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, Curculionidae (Scolytinae)] are among the most damaging forest pests, and species of quarantine significance are frequently moved intercontinentally. Early detection of these potentially invasive species is critical for their effective management, and while current surveillance methods...
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Biological invasions provide a unique opportunity to gain insight into basic biological processes occurring under new circumstances. During the process of establishment, exotic species are exposed to various stressors which may affect their development. Presence of the stressors is often detected by measurements of left-right body asymmetry, which...
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Pine wilt disease is one of the most serious introduced threats to coniferous forests worldwide. Its causal agent, the pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is vectored primarily by cerambycids of the genus Monochamus Dejean throughout its native (North America) and introduced (Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan, Portugal) ranges. Despite s...
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The beech leaf-mining weevil, Orchestes fagi L. (Curculionidae: Curculioninae: Rhamphini), a pest of European beech, Fagus sylvatica L. (Fagaceae), was recently discovered infesting American beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrh., in Nova Scotia, Canada. Adult O. fagi feed on both young and mature leaves of beech as well as on other species (e.g., raspberr...
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We conducted experiments in Jilin, China, in 2011 and 2014 in forest stands dominated by mature Quercus mongolica Fisch. ex Ledeb. (Fagaceae) to test the effects of longhorn beetle pheromones, plant volatiles, and trap height on catch of Neocerambyx raddei (Blessig & Solsky) (formerly Massicus raddei) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in traps. Traps capt...
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The effectiveness of a four-component "super lure" consisting of ethanol (E) and the cerambycid pheromones syn-2,3-hexanediol (D6), racemic 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one (K6), and racemic 3-hydroxyoctan-2-one (K8) on trap catches of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) was determined in southeast United States with seven trapping experiments in 2011-2013. We captured...
Article
Tetropium fuscum (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is an invasive phloeophagous beetle established in Atlantic Canada that infests stressed and moribund Picea Dietrich (Pinaceae) species. Successfully colonised trees tend to be large in diameter (>10 cm diameter at breast height), but whether diameter influences host selection, larval performa...
Article
Tetropium fuscum (F.), native to Europe and established in Nova Scotia, Canada, since at least 1990, is considered a low-to-moderate threat to spruce (Picea spp.) forests in North America and regulated as a quarantine pest by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. We tested broadcast applications of the aggregation pheromone racemic (5E)-6,10-dimethy...
Article
We investigated the potential for human-mediated range expansion of an exotic beech leaf-mining weevil, Orchestes fagi (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Curculioninae: Rhamphini) (formerly known as Rhynchaenus fagi) on timber or firewood, which for eight to nine months of the year may harbour adults in diapause. In both relatively low-density...
Article
Christmas trees from Nova Scotia, Canada are banned from import into the European Union (EU) because they may be infected with the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner and Buhrer) Nickle (Nematoda: Parasitaphelenchidae). Monochamus Dejean (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) species known to vector pinewood nematode are present in Nova Scot...
Article
The increasing threat of alien wood-boring insect has resulted in the initiation of large-scale monitoring programmes. These programmes are most often based on pheromone-bailed traps, which allow the early detection and monitoring of invasive species. This approach is expensive because it entails the processing and accurate identification of large...
Article
We examined the native community of insects interacting with an invasive species, Tetropium fuscum (F.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), in its new range to explore reasons for the invader’s relatively slow spread. Tetropium fuscum is a European spruce borer established in Nova Scotia since at least 1990, but it has spread only about 125 km from its sit...
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Detection tools are needed for Monochamus species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) because they are known to introduce pine wilt disease by vectoring nematodes in Asia, Europe, and North America. In 2012-2014, we examined the effects of the semiochemicals monochamol and ipsenol on the flight responses of the sawyer beetles Monochamus carolinensis (Olivie...
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The Coleoptera of New Brunswick have generated interest among entomologists for over a century. The first records of Coleoptera from New Brunswick were the adventive Carabus granulatus Linnaeus and Carabus nemoralis Muller collected by W.H. Harrington in Saint John during 1891 (Harrington 1892). The first significant sampling of Coleoptera, and ins...
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The Ciidae of New Brunswick, Canada are reviewed. Seventeen species are recorded for New Brunswick, including the following 10 species that are newly recorded for the province: Ceracis singularis (Dury), Ceracis thoracicornis (Ziegler), Cis angustus Hatch, Cis fuscipes Mellié, Cis horridulus Casey, Cis striatulus Mellié, Dolichocis laricinus (Melli...
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This paper presents 27 new records of Curculionoidea for the province of New Brunswick, Canada, including three species new to Canada, and 12 adventive species, as follows: Eusphryrus walshii LeConte, Choragus harrisii LeConte (newly recorded for Canada), Choragus zimmermanni LeConte (newly recorded for Canada) (Anthribidae); Cimberis pallipennis (...
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This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostr...
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The following three species of Helophoridae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada: Helophorus (Kyphohelophorus) turberculatus Gyllenhal, Helophorus (Rhopaleloporus) oblongus LeConte, Helophorus (Rhopaleloporus) marginicollis Smetana. Hydrochus subcupreus Randall, family Hydrochidae, and the following 15 species of Hydrophilidae are newly rep...