Jon Pynoos

Jon Pynoos
University of Southern California | USC · School of Gerontology

MCP, Ph.D

About

58
Publications
15,126
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,325
Citations
Citations since 2016
0 Research Items
660 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Objective: To test whether limitations in mobility and large-muscle functioning mediate self-reported vision status to increase fall risk among respondents age 65 and above. Method: This study used two waves from the Health and Retirement Study. We conducted binary logistic and negative binomial regression analyses to test indirect paths leading...
Article
Full-text available
The Fall Prevention Center of Excellence designed three progressive intensity fall prevention program models, Increasing Stability Through Evaluation and Practice (INSTEP) to reduce risk in community-dwelling older adults. Each model included physical activity, medical risk and home safety components and was implemented as a 12-week program for sma...
Article
Falls in older adults are a serious problem for individuals, their families, and the health care system. This article describes research regarding fall risk assessment, risk reduction interventions, and public policy aimed at reducing the risk of falls for older adults in home settings. Assessments for frail older adults should include observations...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 30 years, policy makers and professionals who provide services to older adults with chronic conditions and impairments have placed greater emphasis on conceptualizing aging in place as an attainable and worthwhile goal. Little is known, however, of the changes in how this concept has evolved in aging research. To track trends in aging...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this article is to describe four main areas of falls-prevention intervention for older adults who are blind or visually impaired. When integrated into multifactorial programs, interventions pertaining to education, medical assessment, exercise and physical activity, and environmental assessment and modification have been shown to be...
Article
This article discusses the role of home assessment and environmental modification in reducing the risk of falls and helping older adults and persons with disabilities live in the community. This article reviews the research on the efficacy of home environmental assessment and modification. Researchers agree that integrated risk-management programs...
Article
Naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs) are neighborhoods or buildings in which a significant portion of the population is composed of older persons. Unlike traditional retirement communities, NORCs were not designed specifically for the needs of older persons; they simply evolved, often as a result of older people aging in places where...
Article
Full-text available
Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) are neighborhoods or buildings in which older people represent a significant proportion of the population, but for whom the communities were not planned to meet their needs. Bringing activities and services to these communities provides a mechanism for increasing access to needed resources and supp...
Article
Full-text available
Modifying one's home is an important strategy to manage chronic health conditions, increase independence, and ensure safety of frail older adults. However, in many areas of the country home modifications are difficult to obtain due to either a lack of specialists or a comprehensive assessment tool that would enable specialists to diagnose problems...
Article
Objective. To assess direct effects of self-rated vision, home modifications, and limb functioning, and moderating effects of self-rated vision on change in functioning of upper and lower limbs on fall risk in older adults. Method. Logistic regression was used to analyze 2004 and 2006 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. Results. Effects of se...
Conference Paper
Most of what is known about fall prevention activities emanates from randomized controlled trials. However, community organizations often have difficulty with translating these rigorous findings into existing service structures or their local area. This presentation will describe activities, outcomes, and lessons learned for two types of local capa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Fall injuries threaten the health and quality of life of California's 3.7 million older adults aged 65 and over. Projections indicate this number will double to more than 8.3 million by 2030. Nationwide, about one-quarter of older adults fall each year. Of those who fall, 20% to 30% suffer moderate to severe injuries. Persons age 75 and older who f...
Article
Because many communities where older people live were not designed for their needs, older residents may require support to remain in the least restrictive environment. ‘Age-prepared communities’ utilize community planning and advocacy to foster aging in place. ‘Elder-friendly communities’ are places that actively involve, value, and support older a...
Article
Full-text available
Caraviello "Aging in place" refers to the desire of older people to stay in their own homes and communities in spite of encroaching infirmities, and it is an increasingly important aspect of public policy. This movement has gained impetus from the Supreme Court's decision in Olmstead v. L.C., which requires states to make community-integrated suppo...
Article
The Fall Prevention Center of Excellence (Center), a consortium of federal, state, and private organizations, was established in 2005 to guide the implementation of a statewide initiative to prevent falls among older Californians. The process began with the convening of a representative group of recognized leaders in California's health and human s...
Article
Visitability legislation, which requires minimum accessibility in single-family homes, is an unprecedented advancement in disability policy that began with the passage of an Atlanta ordinance in 1992 and has spread to other jurisdictions. Based on the diffusion of innovation model (Gray, 1973), our study used interviews, news articles, and analyses...
Article
Because many communities where older people live were not designed for their needs, older residents may require support to remain in the least restrictive environment. "Age-prepared communities" utilize community planning and advocacy to foster aging in place. "Elder-friendly communities" are places that actively involve, value, and support older a...
Article
This article explores the relationship between zoning regulations and co-residential family caregiving in the United States. It first provides an overview of U.S. housing policies, especially zoning. We then describe major changes in family structure and composition in the United States with their implications for caregiving and discuss how multige...
Article
Full-text available
Falls and fall-related injuries, prevalent among older adults, not only have devastating consequences for older adults in terms of morbidity and mortality, but are also associated with high health care costs. Studies have found that multifactorial intervention strategies can effectively prevent and/or reduce falls among older adults. The purpose of...
Article
Families of persons with Alzheimer's disease often need to develop new skills as they take on caregiving roles. Family caregiving may involve not only assisting with tasks of dressing, bathing, and other activities of daily living but also managing difficult behaviors. An unsupportive home environment can add to the demands of caregiving. However,...
Article
Full-text available
State policymakers increasingly recognize that housing is not only an important shelter resource for older persons, but also a key element of community-based care. Over the last two decades, significant state and local activity has led to an increase in service-enriched housing for older persons. Service-enriched housing refers to living arrangemen...
Article
Home modifications can aid in the performance of tasks and support independent living. However, obtaining funding in the United States is difficult for both individuals and home modification programs. For individuals, cost is an important factor in the decision of whether to obtain home modifications, along with the perceived need and perceived eff...
Article
M. Powell Lawton can be credited for important advancements in the home modification field. His work extended beyond theoretical contributions to practical efforts that directly impact older adults' lives. Developments in home modification research, assessment approaches, and the service delivery system can be attributed to his influence. Lawton's...
Article
Home modifications (HMs) are an effective strategy to improve older people’s quality of life. In this paper, the authors analyze the evolution of home modification support programs for the community-dwelling frail elderly in Japan from an historical perspective. First, Japan-specific issues that relate to home modifications are explained. Next, the...
Article
Increasingly, case managers recognize the importance of home modifications in helping older people age in place. They also realize that the quality of life of people of all ages with disabilities can be enhanced with simple adaptations. Unfortunately, many case managers find it difficult to integrate home modifications into their care plans. Barrie...
Article
Housing people with HIV/AIDSis a pressing need as poor and disenfranchised groups are increasingly infected. Advocates, planners, and direct care workers lack information on the impact of HIV/AIDShousing from the perspective of residents. This study interviews 57 persons in subsidized housing solely for people with HIV/AIDS. Findings indicate that...
Article
The growing number of older adults and younger persons with disabilities who would benefit from home modifications have not yet been matched by a delivery system capable of responding to their needs. The delivery system for home modifications is a patchwork of fragmented and uncoordinated services with significant gaps in types of services availabl...
Article
Beginning in the late 1980s, government-assisted housing for elderly persons, a popular and successful housing type, began to experience an in-movement of younger persons with disabilities. Advocates for the elderly population expressed alarm about the negative consequences for elderly persons of such “mixing” and of the turnover of this housing to...
Article
This study presents qualitative and quantitative data describingfriendship and social interaction in a continuing care retirement community (CCRC), and social ties to persons living elsewhere. Structured interviews, including an adapted version of Fischer's Social Network Index, were conducted with 50 residents (mean age = 80.9 years). On average,...
Article
Advocates of policies designed to link federally assisted housing with social services for the frail elderly have encountered barriers such as the historical separation of housing and services, political and bureaucratic fragmentation, and budget constraints. Over a 20-year period, they have attempted to address these issues by identifying the natu...
Article
A multi-disciplinary pilot research project assessed the needs of persons with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers in the home, identified target areas for intervention, and implemented specific caregiver-selected interventions. An evaluation of the pilot project indicated that a majority of the interventions that caregivers considered initial...
Article
Until recently there has been limited awareness of the interaction between the adult day care environment and the functioning of participants and staff. Emphasis is often put on the program rather than on the setting in which it takes place. Even when environmental knowledge exists, there is often a lack of input by staff and adaptations may be mad...
Article
This study surveyed a random sample of 144 house shares of one of the country's oldest matching programs to investigate which types of persons house share, reasons that people choose house sharing, the types of assistance house sharers need and provide for each other and the types of housing sharing relationships that exist. It found that primary r...
Article
A model telephone support program involved setting up peer networks of four or five caregivers for regular telephone conversations. A randomized comparison was made of participants in networks (n = 31) and participants listening to an informational mini-lecture series assessed over the telephone (n = 35). Results indicated informationgain, increase...
Article
Board and care homes for the elderly offer a protective housing option. However limited resources and an increasingly disabled population have put severe stress on these facilities. This study looks at the boundaries of board and care in a California sample by comparing case examples of problem residents who were asked to leave. Results from a disc...
Article
The telephone network, a new concept in social support, brought family caregivers of Alzheimer's victims together over the telephone in a rotating pattern of twosomes. Five caregiving spouses and five adult children were matched and connected to each other over a 3-month period. The program included 25 audiotaped mini-lectures accessed over the tel...
Article
This is a study of how a bureaucracy allocates a commodity or a service in this case, public housing. In the broadest sense, it seeks to understand how bureaucrats try to resolve two often conflicting goals of regulatory justice: equity (treating like cases alike on the basis of rules) and respon siveness (making exceptions for persons whose needs...
Article
Board and care homes for the elderly offer a protective housing option. However limited resources and an increasingly disabled population have put severe stress on these facilities. This study looks at the boundaries of board and care in a California sample by comparing case examples of problem residents who were retained in board and care homes an...
Article
The Foundation to Assist California Teachers (FACT) is a non-profit organization which owns and operates retirement housing for teachers. To identify the demand for additional retirement housing facilities and explore "shared housing" alternatives, retired women teachers (N=2,740) in California completed a mail questionnaire which assessed: (1) age...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Guided by a disablement framework that positions the ability to age in place as a matter of fit between person and environment, the overall objective of this 2-year project is to investigate ways to efficiently reduce the gap between the needs of chronically homeless adults and the housing and support service options that are currently available. Specifically, this exploratory R21 funded by the National Institute on Aging will provide new data on whether and how evidence-based prevention and management strategies that target age-related health conditions (e.g., functional and cognitive impairments, frailty, hearing and visual impairments) can be integrated in permanent supportive housing.