Jon Gemmell

Jon Gemmell
Kennet School · Sociology

PhD

About

25
Publications
1,404
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79
Citations
Introduction
Jon Gemmell is a Sociology teacher at Kennet School, Thatcham. His main area of research is in politics and cricket. He has written articles on most of the major Test playing sides and two books, the latest of which is 'Cricket's Changing Ethos'.

Publications

Publications (25)
Chapter
Cricket may well have preached fairness, responsibility, respect for one’s opponents, and the coming together of people; it did not, however, believe in the ‘unnaturalness’ of equality. Focusing on the West Indies and India, Gemmell assesses the importance for the rulers of maintaining authority through the leadership of the cricket team. The polar...
Chapter
This chapter examines how the ethos of cricket came to appear outdated. It looks at the decline of Britain as a colonial power, the demise of amateur influence, the emergence of one-day cricket and commercial interests, and the shifting of power to the subcontinent. Much of what was held sacrosanct in the sport’s ethos was undermined in an age wher...
Chapter
This chapter looks at the origins of cricket. It considers the folk-games of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in order to seek an answer to who played cricket and why. It then contemplates the role of the aristocracy in developing cricket and considers their encouragement alongside the changing social environment and their declining politic...
Chapter
The final chapter places the demise of the traditional ethos alongside what cricket has come to mean today. Importantly, it looks at who is shaping the direction of the ‘spirit of the game’. This chapter is about the rise of the subcontinent, and in particular India. It looks at the continuing rise of the one-day game, especially 20-over cricket an...
Chapter
Nationalism is not a unitary creed, appearing in many shapes. Gemmell considers how national identities in the Empire were carved out of a rejection of colonial rule. An examination of the West Indies, Australia, and South Africa shows how national unity was expressed through the cricket team before actual political union. Using Ireland and India,...
Chapter
There is a wealth of literature on cricket ranging from historical and political texts to summaries of tours and individual biographies. Cricket has also inspired the poet and the artist. Gemmell considers how some of these writings are associated with the spirit of the game and then examines how this could be linked to a wider ethos and used to be...
Chapter
The contemporary sport is considered in terms of three key themes that will determine the path that the ethos of cricket treads in future years. Gemmell looks at the future prospects for cricket alongside the forces of globalisation and the rise of India as a cultural superpower. There is a brief statistical analysis of the demise of Test cricket a...
Chapter
Cricket had an important role to play in the development of ethos throughout the colonial world. Respect for authority may be difficult to instil into a population subject to alien rule, but if taught through values that have been applied to the everyday social world, it may prove more acceptable. Gemmell considers the lessons that were promoted an...
Book
This book examines historically how cricket was codified out of its variant folk-forms and then marketed with certain lessons sought to reinforce the values of a declining landed interest. It goes on to show how such values were then adapted as part of the imperial experiment and were eventually rejected and replaced with an ethos that better refle...
Article
There is an extensive literature analysing the relationship between sport and the social world. This article adds to this by making a study of the association between politics and cricket in South Africa. It takes as a case study the role of South Africa's participation in the 1992 World Cup and the political processes that first allowed it and the...
Article
This essay was written to commemorate the centenary of the founding of the Imperial Cricket Conference in 1909. Australia and England were the two leading international sides and would be joined by South Africa to form a body that would play a role in overseeing the sport's future development. The coming together of national boards into an internat...
Article
Cricket's imperial lineage continues to define its meaning in parts of the erstwhile British Empire. Simultaneously, the game is now a metaphor for the forces of globalization and a vehicle for asserting new post-colonial identities. The creation of the lucrative Indian Premier League and India's rise as the financial epicentre of the game is refle...
Article
This study considers the history of Irish cricket in the context of wider social and political developments. It looks at the origins of the sport, how they came to be associated with a British presence in Ireland and the implications of this during a period of nationalist revival. It considers the rise and decline of cricket in Ireland and provides...
Article
This introductory essay seeks to contextualize the contributions in the volume by comparing and contrasting cricket with other sports. Though not wishing to portray cricket in essentialist terms, or as temporally fixed or uncontested, the essay suggests that cricket has certain peculiar features which are not only celebrated by cricket followers an...
Article
This study considers the history of inclusion of black South Africans. It makes a number of points around which the work is focused. Firstly, that blacks have always taken an interest in cricket, and enjoy a long history of playing the sport. Secondly, that they were excluded from progressing in cricket because of racist attitudes and government po...
Article
This study considers the question of why Australian cricket is still seen as a sport dominated by the white population. It takes as its starting point the riots on Cronulla beach at the end of 2005 to highlight a country that holds a number of conflicting cultural beliefs. That these beliefs can place barriers to playing cricket is shown by an exam...

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Project (1)
Archived project
Book release in May 2018