Jon D. Erickson

Jon D. Erickson
University of Vermont | UVM · Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources

PhD

About

96
Publications
32,005
Reads
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2,563
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
1017 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Additional affiliations
July 2002 - present
University of Vermont
Position
  • Professor (Full)
August 1997 - June 2002
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
September 1993 - May 1997
Cornell University
Field of study
  • Natural Resource Economics

Publications

Publications (96)
Book
We live under the illusion of progress: as long as GDP is going up and prices stay low, we accept poverty and pollution as unfortunate but inevitable byproducts of a successful economy. In fact, the infallibility of the free market and the necessity of endless growth are so ingrained in the public consciousness that they seem like scientific fact....
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses the major tenets of ecological economics--including value pluralism, methodological pluralism and multi-criteria policy assessment. Ecological economics offers viable alternatives to the theoretical foundations and policy recommendations of neoclassical welfare economics. A revolution in neoclassical economics is currently taki...
Article
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Jonna Mazet and colleagues describe their work in the Tanzania-based HALI Project, which adopts the "One Health" approach to address emerging zoonoses and that recognizes the interconnectedness of human, animal, and environmental health.
Article
As societal demand for food, water and other life-sustaining resources grows, the science of ecosystem services (ES) is seen as a promising tool to improve our understanding, and ultimately the management, of increasingly uncertain supplies of critical goods provided or supported by natural ecosystems. This promise, however, is tempered by a relati...
Article
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There is wide variability in how organizations approach sustainability and the energy system transition toward using more renewables. In the electric power industry, while some distribution utilities have leaned into the transition, others have taken a more conservative approach. Grounded in an institutional resource-based perspective, this multi-l...
Article
Energy systems are inherently spatial entities, encompassing infrastructure and land requirements; diverse perspectives of energy system stakeholders tied to locations of supply and demand; and ultimately a spatial distribution of profits, environmental impacts, and societal changes. The spatial relationships between these social and physical compo...
Chapter
Full-text available
Ecological economics (EE) is a transdiscipline. While it is difficult to categorize ecological economics in the same way one would a normal academic discipline, it can be characterized in general by its goals, worldview, and methodology. The overarching goal is sustainable wellbeing of both humans and the rest of nature, with three broad sub-goals...
Chapter
Ecological economists have often argued that the very nature of modern money, created by banks through interest-bearing debt, forces our socio-economic system to seek perpetual growth if we are to avoid a systemic collapse. The foundations of this so-called ‘monetary growth imperative’ suffer from theoretical weaknesses, as shown by several scholar...
Chapter
Given the context and definition of ecological economics, stakeholder engagement is an important aspect of both its dissemination and traction. Herein, however, lies a significant challenge. Though stakeholder engagement has been a subject of business and management operations, and is widely discussed across academic disciplines, there has been lit...
Book
Full-text available
PREFACE Ecological economics (EE) is a transdisciplinary field that integrates the study and management of the human economy embedded in society and the rest of nature. It acknowledges the biophysical realities of a finite world and the need to create a fair and just society focused on sustainable wellbeing. It acknowledges that the planet we live...
Article
Ecological economics recognizes economic activity as a biophysical process mediated by social systems and ultimately subject to the constraints of a finite earth system. The Anthropocene discourse appears as validation of the central concerns of ecological economics yet throws into relief its limits as a normative transdiscipline oriented toward so...
Article
Electric utilities and regulators primarily rely on rate design strategies and economic incentives to achieve customer load malleability at the residential level. However, demand-side management strategies are broadening to incorporate new motivational cues based on pro-social impulses to reduce negative environmental impact and contribute meaningf...
Article
The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) was designed to reveal the trade-offs between costs and benefits of economic growth. Although originally estimated and contrasted with Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at national scales, an interest in a state-level adoption has developed in the United States to inform and guide policy. As GPI scholarship and a com...
Presentation
The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) is a multi-dimensional composite indicator that estimates the quantity and distribution of net benefits of the economic system on supporting social and environmental systems. It has been developed and modified for nearly three decades utilizing mixed methods from macroeconomics, environmental economics, natural...
Article
Full-text available
Higher education in the global North, and exported elsewhere, is complicit in driving the planet's socio-ecological crises by teaching how to most effectively marginalize and plunder Earth and human communities. As students and activists within the academic system, we take a firm stand to arrest this cycle, and to redirect education toward teaching...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological economics arose as a normative transdiscipline aiming to generate knowledge and tools to help transition the economy toward a scale which is sustainable within the bounds of the earth system. Yet it remains unclear in practice how to legitimize its explicitly normative agenda. One potential means for legitimation can be found in delibera...
Article
Ecological economics has long claimed distributive justice as a central tenet, yet discussions of equity and justice have received relatively little attention over the history of the field. While ecological economics has aspired to be transdisciplinary, its framing of justice is hardly pluralistic. Feminist perspectives and justice frameworks offer...
Article
The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) was designed to reveal the economic, social, and environmental trade-offs associated with conventional economic growth as traditionally measured by Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Although originally designed for use at the national scale, an interest has developed in the United States in a state-level uptake of t...
Article
Phosphorus (P) is a scarce but critical input for agriculture, yet its overuse can lead to water quality degradation. Most P applied as fertilizer and manure binds to soils, accumulating over time, constituting a legacy source with implications for mitigating nutrient pollution. To investigate how the flows and balance of P evolved over a period of...
Chapter
A consistent concern of ecological economics has been the biophysical and institutional foundations of the economy. During the formalisation of the field, scholars such as Daly (1968), Victor (1972), and Herendeen (1974) helped to align questions over the energy, materials, and pollution basis of the economy with methodological approaches of input-...
Article
Full-text available
The deterioration of environmental conditions during the last century are accelerating and threaten the future of humanity and the myriad other species with which we share heritage and destiny. Much of the Earth's fresh water is contaminated, in short supply, or subject to competing claims. The pattern and rate by which human society consumes non-r...
Article
The production of ecosystem goods and services has increased significantly in the last 100 years, while the capacity of ecosystems to generate supporting and regulating services has decreased. In this context, agriculture and livestock production have become major concerns. At the same time, livestock, particularly dairy cows, play a key role and c...
Article
Successful conservation strategies have increasingly looked beyond bounded protected areas and toward integrated landscape approaches that conserve biodiversity while maintaining ecosystem services that benefit human communities and food production. More integrated approaches to conservation are particularly timely in agricultural landscapes, where...
Data
Full-text available
Theory evolves by succession or surrender. By succession, one theory leads to the next iteration – the version is updated but the platform remains intact. By surrender, the old yields to the new based on refutation of theory inconsistent with observation. Similarly, the speed in which hard won knowledge enters new texts, educates new practitioners,...
Article
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Sustainable management of landscapes with multiple competing demands such as the Ruaha Landscape is complex due to the diverse preferences and needs of stakeholder groups involved. This study uses conjoint analysis to assess the preferences of representatives from three stakeholder groups-local communities, district government officials, and non-go...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Vermont is leading the nation in the development, adoption, and implementation of new indicators that guide genuine economic progress. A central policy challenge is that economic benefits are often privately captured, market-based, and short-term, and thus relatively easy to count and guide decisions. However, many of the costs of economic activity...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We analyzed how three different dairy management systems –continuous grazing, confinement and management intensive grazing-compare across nine sustainability indicators set by the Dairy Stewardship Alliance. A self-assessment survey comprising animal husbandry, biodiversity, energy, community health, farm financials, nutrient, pest, water and soil...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Livestock production in semi-arid grasslands is extremely vulnerable to climate change through altered water resource and disease dynamics. These vulnerabilities impact livestock survival and marketability, household livelihoods and health, and wildlife populations by enhancing zoonotic disease transmission pathways. Models that can integrate the i...
Article
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Previous observational and quasi-experimental studies in sub-Saharan Africa have suggested the effectiveness of youth-targeted HIV prevention interventions using sport as an educational tool. No studies have yet assessed the effect of similar programs in the Caribbean. A quasi-experimental trial was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a sports...
Article
On 18 September 2004, The Wildlife Society (TWS) published an official policy statement on economic growth and wildlife conservation. We believe this policy statement did not adequately address the issues. Thus, TWS missed an opportunity to lead the natural resource profession in refuting the fallacious rhetoric that “there is no conflict between e...
Conference Paper
The modification of hydrologic systems in coffee-dominated landscapes varies widely according to the degree of shade trees incorporated in coffee farms. Compared to mono-cropping systems, shade coffee can produce both on- and off-farm benefits in the form of soil retention, moderation of sediment transport, and lower hydropower generating costs. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Every day thousands of children and adults die from underdiagnosed diseases that have arisen at the human–animal– environment interface, especially diarrhe-al and respiratory diseases in developing countries [1,2]. Explosive human popu-lation growth and environmental changes have resulted in increased numbers of people living in close contact with...
Article
We present an interdisciplinary modeling framework to investigate how human socio-economic activities influence the spatial pattern of urbanization, and how consequent changes in land use affect water quality and stream ecosystem condition. The framework is composed of three submodels considering (1) the social and economic structures based upon a...
Article
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Pastoralists in East Africa face a multitude of challenges relating to land ownership, environmental concerns and access to government services. These difficulties may disproportionately affect women due to traditional gender roles within pastoralist society. HALI project team members conducted an assessment of gender-roles in pastoralist household...
Article
Full-text available
In sub-Saharan Africa, livestock deaths due to disease have large impacts on household income and nutrition. As part of the larger Health for Animals and Livelihood Improvement (HALI) project assessing the impact of zoonotic disease and water scarcity on rural livelihoods, the authors examined the association between landscape factors and livestock...
Book
The Adirondack region of New York State is, in many respects, America’s cauldron of conservation. It was there, more than a century ago, that wanton exploitation of forests first aroused concern about human impact on the environment. It was there that Americans first began to set aside lands proclaimed as "forever wild." The establishment of the Ad...
Article
Full-text available
The emergence and spread of infectious diseases at the interface of humans, livestock, and wildlife are increasingly recognized as critical issues by health specialists, disease ecologists, conservation biologists, wildlife managers, and protected area managers throughout the world. Addressing the causes and consequences of disease requires investi...
Article
Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) provides a well-established family of decision tools to aid stakeholder groups in arriving at collective decisions. MCDA can also function as a framework for the social learning process, serving as an educational aid in decision problems characterized by a high level of public participation. In this paper, the...
Chapter
Over the past three decades ecological economics has emerged as a coherent transdisciplinary approach to environmental problem solving. However, its evolution has been quite dissimilar in different parts of the world. In the US and UK, ecological economics evolved as a critique of and alternative to a comparatively strict application of economic th...
Chapter
Direct economic use and changing patterns of human habitation have long been a cause of concern for the ecological health of many rivers and tributaries. Current development trends in many watersheds are driving the conversion of rural, agricultural and forestland to urban or industrial uses. While any single project may not have an adverse effect...
Chapter
Our primary goal is to develop an integrated, quantitative assessment tool evaluating how human economic activities influence spatial patterns of urbanization, and how land-use change resulting from urbanization affects stream water quality and aquatic ecosystem health. Here we present a prototype of a holistic assessment tool composed of three “bu...
Chapter
Full-text available
The interaction of urban cores and their rural hinterlands is considered from an ecological–economic perspective. The concept of ‘urban metabolism’ motivates discussion of urban dependence on geographic regions outside their borders for both sources of inputs and as waste sinks. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1989 Surface-Water Treatmen...
Chapter
Environmental decision making involving multiple stakeholders can benefit from the use of a formal process to structure stakeholder interactions, leading to more successful outcomes than traditional discursive decision processes. There are many tools available to handle complex decision making. Here we illustrate the use of a multicriteria decision...
Chapter
This chapter presents projections of residential development in Wappinger Creek watershed of Dutchess County, New York in the Hudson River Valley. A spatial econometric model is developed based on data from a geographical information system (GIS) of county-level socio-economic trends, tax parcel attributes, town-level zoning restrictions, location...
Book
Research on the cutting-edge of economics, ecology, and ethics is presented in this timely study. Building from a theoretical critique of the tradition of cost–benefit analysis, the contributors lay the foundation for a macroeconomics of environmental sustainability and distributive justice. Attention is then turned to three of the most critical ar...
Book
Full-text available
The papers in this volume illustrate the power of a scientific approach to ecological economics. Good science is a careful blend of theory and empirical testing. Theory without empirical grounding is of no practical value and random case studies without a theoretical context are not generalizable. The back and forth interplay between theory and evi...
Article
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This article outlines an approach, based on ecosystem services, for assessing the trade-offs inherent in managing humans embedded in ecological systems. Evaluating these trade-offs requires an understanding of the biophysical magnitudes of the changes in ecosystem services that result from human actions, and of the impact of these changes on human...
Article
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Ecovillages, co-housing communities, and other types of intentional communities (ICs) have proliferated in recent years. There are currently several thousands of these communities worldwide and their numbers are increasing rapidly. We surveyed a subset of these communities to learn more about their characteristics, including their world view or vis...
Article
During the past decade theoretical and empirical advances in neoclassical economics have resulted in the virtual rejection of the two pillars of traditional welfare economics-- rational economic man and perfect competition. Surprisingly, many ecological economists are moving closer to the discredited neo-Walrasian welfare model just at the time it...
Article
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Parcel by parcel, urban/suburban development is one of the most active converters of land in the Hudson River Valley in New York State. We are taking an integrative approach to understanding the drivers of and responses to urbanization, by studying how economy drives land use change and how that, in turn, affects downstream indicators of ecosystem...
Article
The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), a version of the Index of Sustainable Economic Welfare (ISEW), is a significantly more comprehensive approach to assessing economic progress than conventional measures like gross domestic product (GDP). GPI adjusts for income distribution effects, the value of household and volunteer work, costs of mobility and...
Article
This paper analyzes the relationship between current renewable energy technology costs and cumulative production, research, development and demonstration expenditures, and other institutional influences. Combining the theoretical framework of ‘learning by doing’ and developments in ‘learning by searching’ with the fields of organizational learning...
Article
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Incorporating potential catastrophic consequences into integrated assessment models of climate change has been a top priority of policymakers and modelers alike. We review the current state of scientific understanding regarding three frequently mentioned geophysical catastrophes, with a view toward their implications for integrated assessment model...
Article
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Recent models of adaptation to climate change have allowed economic agents perfect foresight about future climatic conditions. We argue that it is time to move beyond assumptions of perfect foresight to consider the impacts of changing climate predictability on adaptation dynamics. An option value investment model is used to illustrate the impact o...
Article
This article reports on a simulation and scenario analysis of Chinese passenger vehicle growth and resulting energy demand and CO-sub-2 emissions. The model includes provincial level logistic growth functions with saturation levels representative of neighboring Asian economies, income growth measured in international dollars, and both estimated and...
Article
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Recent terrorist attacks in the United States have increased concerns about potential national security consequences from energy supply disruptions. The purpose of this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) is to develop a high-level dynamic simulation model that would allow policy makers to explore the national security consequences of...
Article
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Change in ownership of large land resources in the northeastern United States is reshaping the economic and cultural landscape. The Adirondack Park of New York State has taken aggressive steps toward land conservation through public land acquisition and private land planning. The State’s decision to either acquire more land for protecting open spac...
Article
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Agronomists consider the continuity and nutrient capturing properties of cover crops as important determinants of nutrient cycling in agricultural systems. Managing for these biotic control functions can help limit nutrient loss and groundwater contamination between main crop harvests. This simulation study highlights the potentiat role of cover cr...
Article
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This paper examines two Pacific Island cultures, Easter Island and Tikopia, and the relationship between natural resource systems, human-made capital, population growth, and institutional change. Easter Island followed a preindustrial society pattern of overshoot-and collapse. However, Tikopia evolved cultural practices leading to zero-population g...
Article
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"The benefits and risks of any particular GM crop depend on the interactions of its ecological functions and natural history with the agroecosystem and ecosystems within which it is embedded. These evolutionary and ecological factors must be considered when assessing GM crops. We argue that the assessment of GM crops should be broadened to include...
Article
Species and ecosystems have been assigned dollar values through methods developed by economists. Their value is then measured in financial terms and becomes comparable to any good or service traded in markets. This assignment of economic value to biodiversity and species will not guarantee their protection. In fact, pricing these nonmarket values a...
Chapter
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Pursuing the goal of large-scale ecosystem protection, the State of New York has for decades been acquiring private land parcels in the Adirondack State Park. While effective in terms of environmental protection, the process has repeatedly caused tensions with local communities who found themselves deprived of development possibilities. To ease the...
Article
The forest rotations problem has been considered by generations of economists (Fisher, 1930; Boulding, 1966; Samuelson, 1976). Traditionally, the forest resource across all future harvest periods is assumed to grow without memory of past harvest periods. This paper integrates economic theory and intertemporal ecological mechanics, linking current h...
Article
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China's projected oil import requirements and greenhouse gas emissions from energy consumption will dominate the international oil market and environmental agendas. As a result of these energy requirements, China has recently expanded development of domestic oil supplies and coal production. Effectively limiting greenhouse gas emmissions will requi...
Thesis
The long-term sustainability of human communities will depend on our relationship with regional environments, our maintenance of renewable resources, and our successful disengagement from nonrenewable energy dependence. This dissertation investigates sustainability at these three levels, following a critical analysis of sustainability and economics...
Article
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Solar energy is one option for reducing future greenhouse gas emissions. Offsetting 50% of all future growth in thermal electricity generation by photovoltaics (PVs) would reduce annual global carbon dioxide emission from projected increased levels by 10% in 20 years and 32% in 50 years. Several projects are under way worldwide to demonstrate the f...
Article
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Photovoltaic (PV) electricity has been widely supported as a remote energy source for developing countries. In response, the production and shipment of PV modules in developed nations has steadily increased through the past decade, often marketed through the auspices of technology transfer and financed by international development aid. This paper i...
Article
Are photovoltaic (PV) systems appropriate for use in developing countries now? This paper presents an empirical review of the comparative costs of gasoline portable generators and PV systems and concludes that cost reduction is necessary before PV systems will be broadly competitive. Both private sector research and university research have importa...
Article
The effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on agricultural yields are analyzed. It is argued that any positive effects on yields from CO2 fertilization, demonstrated in controlled experiments, would be weak in farm conditions given water and nutrient limits. Furthermore, possible benefits would be more than offset...