Jolle Wolter Jolles

Jolle Wolter Jolles
CREAF Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications | CREAF · Department of Ecology

MSc PhD

About

52
Publications
8,259
Reads
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Introduction
I am an independent severo-ochoa postdoctoral researcher at CREAF, Barcelona, using an individual-based approach to understand how animal groups form and function and deal with environmental change.
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - December 2015
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2011 - August 2013
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (52)
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that animals often differ consistently from one another in their behaviour. Most work has focused on consistent differences in average behaviour, generally referred to as 'animal per-sonality'. However, individuals may also differ consistently from one another in how they change their behaviour over time or across environment...
Article
Full-text available
Social grouping is omnipresent in the animal kingdom. Considerable research has focused on understanding how animal groups form and function, including how collective behaviour emerges via self-organising mechanisms and how phenotypic variation drives the behaviour and functioning of animal groups. However, we still lack a mechanistic understanding...
Preprint
Full-text available
The field of biology has seen tremendous technological progress in recent years, fuelled by the exponential growth in processing power and high-level computing, and the rise of global information sharing. Low-cost single-board computers are predicted to be one of the key technological advancements to further revolutionise this field. So far, an ove...
Article
We outline key mechanisms by which fishing can change the shoaling tendency and collective behaviour of exploited species – an issue that is rarely considered and poorly understood. We highlight potential consequences for fish populations and food webs, and discuss possible repercussions for fisheries and conservation strategies.
Article
In the early morning, large groups of up to hundreds or even thousands of roosting birds, sometimes comprising the entire roost population, often take off together in sudden mass departures. These departures commonly occur in low-light conditions and structurally complex habitats where access to visual cues is likely to be restricted. Roosting bird...
Article
Openly shared low-cost electronic hardware applications, known as open electronics, have sparked a new open-source movement, with much untapped potential to advance scientific research. Initially designed to appeal to electronic hobbyists, open electronics have formed a global “maker” community and are increasingly used in science and industry. In...
Preprint
Full-text available
Predation is one of the main evolutionary drivers of social grouping. While it is well appreciated that predation risk is likely not shared equally among individuals within groups, its detailed quantification has remained difficult due to the speed of attacks and the highly-dynamic nature of collective prey response. Here, using high-resolution tra...
Article
Full-text available
As individual animals are exposed to varying environmental conditions, phenotypic plasticity will occur in a vast array of physiological traits. For example, shifts in factors such as temperature and oxygen availability can affect the energy demand, cardiovascular system, and neuromuscular function of animals that in turn impact individual behavior...
Article
Full-text available
The collective dynamics and structure of animal groups has attracted the attention of scientists across a broad range of fields. A variety of agent-based models have been developed to help understand the emergence of coordinated collective behavior from simple interaction rules. A common, simplifying assumption of such collective movement models, i...
Preprint
Full-text available
As individual animals are exposed to varying environmental conditions, phenotypic plasticity will occur in a vast array of physiological traits. For example, shifts in factors such as temperature and oxygen availability can affect the energy demand, cardiovascular system, and neuromuscular function of animals that in turn impact individual behaviou...
Preprint
Full-text available
(arXiv:2106.15852) Freely and openly shared low-cost electronic applications, known as open electronics, have sparked a new open-source movement, with much untapped potential to advance scientific research. Initially designed to appeal to electronic hobbyists, open electronics have formed a global community of "makers" and inventors and are increas...
Article
Full-text available
Freely and openly shared low-cost electronic applications, known as open electronics, have sparked a new open-source movement, with much un-tapped potential to advance scientific research. Initially designed to appeal to electronic hobbyists, open electronics have formed a global community of "makers" and inventors and are increasingly used in scie...
Article
Full-text available
The field of biology has seen tremendous technological progress in recent years, fuelled by the exponential growth in processing power and high‐level computing, and the rise of global information sharing. Low‐cost single‐board computers are predicted to be one of the key technological advancements to further revolutionise this field. So far, an ove...
Article
Full-text available
A fundamental component of empirical research is the acquisition of accurate, consistent, and often significant amounts of data. Specifically, researchers often require large numbers of controlled and often parallel image and video recordings. For this the raspberry pi, a small, single-board computer that brings together open-source principles with...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the emergence of collective behaviour has long been a key research focus in the natural sciences. Besides the fundamental role of social interaction rules, a combination of theoretical and empirical work indicates individual speed may be a key process that drives the collective behaviour of animal groups. Socially induced changes in s...
Article
Full-text available
Parasitism is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. Although many fundamental aspects of host-parasite relationships have been unravelled, few studies have systematically investigated how parasites affect organismal movement. Here we combine behavioural experiments of Schistocephalus solidus infected sticklebacks with individual-based simulations to un...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the emergence of collective behaviour has long been a key research focus in the natural sciences. Besides the fundamental role of social interaction rules, a combination of theoretical and empirical work indicates individual speed may be a key process that drives the collective behaviour of animal groups. Socially-induced changes in s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parasitism is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. Although many fundamental aspects of host-parasite relationships have been unravelled, few studies have systematically investigated how parasites affect organismal movement. Here we combine behavioural experiments of Schistocephalus solidus infected sticklebacks with individual-based simulations to un...
Article
Full-text available
Sociality is an omnipresent feature in the animal kingdom, ranging from loose aggregations of animals and fission‐fusion systems to highly stable groups of related individuals. While much work on the topic has focused on understanding the emergence of group‐level properties, relatively little is known about the variability among groups and about co...
Article
Full-text available
Animals switch habitats on a regular basis, and when habitats vary in suitability 21 for parasitism, routine habitat switching alters the frequency of parasite exposure 22 and may affect post-infection parasite proliferation. However, the effects of 23 routine habitat switching on infection dynamics are not well understood. 24 2. We performed infec...
Article
Full-text available
Establishing how collective behaviour emerges is central to our understanding of animal societies. Previous research has highlighted how universal interaction rules shape collective behaviour, and that individual differences can drive group functioning. Groups themselves may also differ considerably in their collective behaviour, but little is know...
Article
Establishing how collective behaviour emerges is central to our understanding of animal societies. Previous research has highlighted how universal interaction rules shape collective behaviour, and that individual differences can drive group functioning. Groups themselves may also differ considerably in their collective behaviour, but little is know...
Article
Animals switch habitats on a regular basis, and when habitats vary in suitability for parasitism, routine habitat switching alters the frequency of parasite exposure and may affect post-infection parasite proliferation. However, the effects of routine habitat switching on infection dynamics are not well understood. 2.We performed infection experime...
Data
Movie showing a group of fish in each of the three assays used for the group experiments: the free-schooling context, the open foraging context, and the semi-covered foraging context.
Data
Movie S3. Individual-Based Simulations of Self-Organizing, Heterogeneous Groups, Related to Figure S4 Movie depicting a visualization of the individual-based simulations of self-organized groups consisting of 5 and 20 agents that differ in their set speed, with the emergence of spatial leadership plotted dynamically over time.
Data
Movie showing the tracking of an individual fish in the classic boldness and sociability assays with the automatically computed behavioral measures.
Article
Full-text available
The ubiquity of consistent inter-individual differ- ences in behavior (‘‘animal personalities’’) [1, 2] sug- gests that they might play a fundamental role in driving the movements and functioning of animal groups [3, 4], including their collective decision-mak- ing, foraging performance, and predator avoidance. Despite increasing evidence that high...
Article
We acknowledge financial support from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (Graduate Research Fellowship to J.W.J), the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour (Research Grants to J.W.J and N.J.B), the Royal Society (Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship to N.J.B), the National Science Foundation (PHY-0848755, IOS-1355061, EAGER-IO...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ubiquity of consistent inter-individual differences in behaviour (‘animal personalities’) 1,2 , suggests they may constitute a fundamental component of animal groups that may drive their functioning 3,4 . Despite increasing evidence that highlights their importance 5–16 , we still lack a unified mechanistic frame-work to explain and predict how...
Article
Full-text available
Neophobia, or the fear of novelty, may offer benefits to animals by limiting their exposure to unknown danger, but can also impose costs by preventing the exploration of potential resources. The costs and benefits of neophobia may vary throughout the year if predation pressure, resource distribution or conspecific competition changes seasonally. De...
Article
Full-text available
To investigate the link between personality and maximum food intake of inactive individuals, food-deprived three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus at rest in their home compartments were provided with ad libitum prey items. Bolder individuals ate considerably more than shyer individuals, even after accounting for body size, while sociabili...
Thesis
Throughout the animal kingdom, individuals often differ consistently from one another in how they cope with their environment. In particular, consistent behavioural variation, known as animal personality, is a substantial driver of a range of important ecological and evolutionary processes. As most animal species are social for at least part of the...
Article
Full-text available
Animal personalities are ubiquitous across the animal kingdom and have been shown both to influence individual behaviour in the social context and to be affected by it. However, little attention has been paid to possible carryover effects of social conditions on personality expression, especially when individuals are alone. Here we investigated how...
Article
Full-text available
Neophobia, or the fear of novelty, may offer benefits to animals by limiting their exposure to unknown danger, but can also impose costs by preventing the exploration of potential resources. The costs and benefits of neophobia may vary throughout the year if predation pressure, resource distribution, or conspecific competition changes seasonally. D...
Article
Full-text available
In many species, males tend to have lower parental investment than females and greater variance in their reproductive success. Males might therefore be expected to adopt more high-risk, high-return behaviours than females. Next to risk-taking behaviour itself, sexes might also differ in how they respond to information and learn new associations owi...
Data
Figure S1: Schematic representation of the novel field test arena. Figure S2: Habituation curves for males and females for the novel open field test session.
Data
Table S1: Individual behavioural data for all male and female subjects for the three different contexts.
Article
Full-text available
Social animals must time and coordinate their behaviour to ensure the benefits of grouping, resulting in collective movements and the potential emergence of leaders and followers. However, individuals often differ consistently from one another in how they cope with their environment, a phenomenon known as animal personality, which may affect how in...
Article
Full-text available
The emergence of leaders and followers is a key factor in facilitating group cohesion in animals. Individual group members have been shown to respond strongly to each other’s behavior and thereby affect the emergence and maintenance of these social roles. However, it is not known to what extent previous social experience might still affect individu...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to recognize other individuals may provide substantial benefits to young birds, allowing them to target their begging efforts appropriately, follow caregivers after fledging, and establish social relationships later in life. Individual recognition using vocal cues is likely to play an important role in the social lives of birds such as...
Article
Full-text available
Taking decisions plays a pivotal role in daily life and comprises a complex process of assessing and weighing short-term and long-term costs and benefits of competing actions. Decision-making has been shown to be affected by factors such as sex, age, genotype, and personality. Importantly, also the social environment affects decisions, both via soc...
Article
Full-text available
Socially foraging animals can search for resources themselves (produce) or exploit the discoveries made by others (scrounge). The extensive literature on producer-scrounger dynamics has mainly focused on scramble competition over readily accessible resources, thereby largely neglecting the variety of scrounging techniques individuals may use as wel...
Article
Full-text available
Flocks of birds in flight represent a striking example of collective behaviour. Models of self-organization suggest that repeated interactions among individuals following simple rules can generate the complex patterns and coordinated movements exhibited by flocks. However, such models often assume that individuals are identical and interchangeable,...
Article
Full-text available
Conformity refers to the act of changing one's behaviour to match that of others. Recent studies in humans have shown that individual differences exist in conformity and that these differences are related to differences in neuronal activity. To understand the neuronal mechanisms in more detail, animal tests to assess conformity are needed. Here, we...
Article
In recent years there has been a rapid growth in the interest in and debate about male-female differences and the role it should play in education. The possible implications for education are quite substantial. However, educational policies and practical teaching methods are still largely lacking an understanding of the specific skills of boys and...

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