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Jolanda De Villiers Morkel

Jolanda De Villiers Morkel
STADIO Higher Education

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23
Publications
8,265
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72
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2021 - present
STADIO Higher Education
Position
  • Head: Instructional Design

Publications

Publications (23)
Chapter
The uptake of design thinking in higher education is on the rise. Yet, it has not been strongly established in academic staff development. This chapter reflects on a blended learning course design intervention, aimed at promoting a ‘design thinking mindset’ among university lecturers. By analysing empirical data gathered through participant interac...
Article
Research on communities of practice suggests that such groups can be used to support academic staff development, especially during times of crisis. We explore how a group of South African women academics and ‘eLearning champions’ engaged in a mobile community of practice under COVID-19 conditions. Our analysis of WhatsApp chat histories and focus g...
Article
Full-text available
This research is situated in the context of our collective exploration of a new ecosystem-of-learning for architectural education, as a catalyst for change following the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. To move online architectural education beyond emergency remote teaching, requires a total reset of current thinking and practices. In this essa...
Article
Common to all the cases included in this special issue, we observed a degree of collaborative decision-making that is human-centered and shows empathy. Through it, multiple voices are acknowledged and heard. These cases demonstrate the beginning of a process of contextualization of Design Thinking in K–12 and teacher education. We hope that this sp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As a contemporary and boundary spanning approach, design thinking is gaining traction in higher education, but it has not yet been established in academic staff development. The aim of this study is to reflect on a recent staff development intervention on blended learning course design, aimed at promoting a 'design thinking mindset' among universit...
Preprint
Full-text available
https://www.routledge.com/Faculty-Perspectives-on-Vocational-Training-in-South-Africa-Lessons-and/Ivala-Scott/p/book/9781138499683 Book chapter in Faculty Perspectives on Vocational Training in South Africa: Lessons and Innovations from the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, 1st Edition Edited by Eunice N. Ivala, Chaunda L. Scott Routledge
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As a contemporary and boundary spanning approach, design thinking is entering higher education yet is unestablished in academic staff development. This study aims to reflect on two staff development interventions, one offered in the United States and one in South Africa, on blended learning course design, aimed at promoting a 'design thinking minds...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Design thinking is entering higher education as traditional thinking models characterised by linear, siloed, and signature pedagogies are proving to be inadequate to respond to the increasingly complex and multifaceted problems students face. In this paper, the authors reflect on a staff development intervention on blended learning course design of...
Conference Paper
Design thinking is entering higher education as traditional thinking models characterised by linear, siloed, and signature pedagogies are proving to be inadequate to respond to the increasingly complex and multifaceted problems students face. In this paper, the authors reflect on a staff development intervention on blended learning course design of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Although digital technologies have started to impact the architecture studio, this field is largely under-researched. Limited empirical results are available on Socratic learning, enabled by student-tutor interactions in the crit, especially associated with the synchronous online studio. This study is situated in a blended undergraduate programme i...
Article
Full-text available
Against the backdrop of a complex Higher Education (HE) landscape, particularly in a developing country context where the relevance of current HE structures is questioned through student protests, and decolonisation of education practices is called for, traditional thinking is losing ground. This study focuses on lecturers identified as eLearning c...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this small-scale research project we were interested in university students’ learning through practice in the outside world in the professional training field of Architecture. Students were interviewed during and immediately after their practical experiences at two different off-campus sites of learning: the architectural office and a community...
Chapter
This chapter reports on how educators at higher education institutions can appropriate emerging technologies to transform pedagogical practices with varying degrees of success. Through these case studies, the chapter illustrates how technologies, not necessarily new technologies, are being used to address teaching and learning challenges. In Case s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Conversational interaction is central to architectural design practice. New information and communication technologies (ICT) change the designer’s traditional way of communicating and interacting. In this paper we investigate how communication in the design process might be supported using ICT. With this aim, we study a text-based Skype conversatio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Studio as a learning space stands at the centre of architectural design teaching and learning. However, the architecture studio, as we know it, is at a crossroads. Students spend less time in the studio and an increasing amount of time in computer labs. These spaces are not conducive to conversation and interaction -activities typical of the studio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Architectural design learning happens in a studio – as it has for almost a century. This is the place where conversation and interaction happens; an environment conducive to critical thinking, conceptualisation and design development. This paper presents work that is part of a current doctoral study by the author, entitled "The online architecture...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There is wide acceptance that the studio stands central to architectural design education (Bakarman, 2003, 2005; Kuhn 2001; Forsyth., Zehner and McDermott 2007). It is a social environment (Gross, 1997; Chen and You 2010:152) which is characterised by communication, critique and collaboration. The studio is a physical place that facilitates pedagog...
Conference Paper
Studio stands at the centre of architectural design teaching and learning. However, the architectural studio, as we know it, is at a crossroads. Students spend less time in the studio and an increasing amount of time in computer labs. These spaces are not conducive to conversation and interaction - activities typical of the studio environment and n...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The increasing ease with which computer technology can be utilised nowadays results in students avoiding the use of physical models. Instead they tend to favour the development of three-dimensional computer models. Before-computer (BC) lecturers do not encourage this practice and believe that physical models still allow the best exploration within...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents a learning, teaching and assessment instrument for undergraduate architectural studio instruction, developed in the Department of Architectural Technology of the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), Cape Town, South Africa. It explains a rational approach to architectural education, which is studio-, project-, process...

Questions

Questions (2)
Bryan, if you're writing from the student's perspective, to what extent are you planning to cover learning theories in this book. 
Question
The crit happens in different formats and different places, between different parties, with the aim to get feedback and move forward in the design process. What is the impact of Information and Communication Technology on this powerful learning and teaching strategy?

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Students in creative fields generally - and in architecture specifically - often find the design studio experience mysterious and frustrating. The mystery comes from the uncertainty of design itself, consequently the blurry nature of feedback, assessment and grading. A key issue facing tutors is deciding on what grounds the feedback and assessment should be based, in other words: how to break down the intangible qualities of design, to make the implicit explicit. Design education is not meant to be solely intuitive; instead its purpose is to support a much richer dialogue that will enhance our learning. Students need guidance to move forward, particularly in the form of authentic feedback related to their (design) process and product. To ensure a continuous process of development, clear, tangible and measurable outcomes are required towards achieving learning and growth through feedback and assessment. The research explores design studio feedback and assessment best practices. It assumes that the desk Crit, as a form of studio feedback, is considered the most relevant, frequent and direct-contact tool, especially when assessing students’ behaviour on the outcomes level of person, product and process. This paper addresses this gap through the design and implementation of a criteria-based assessment model/ intervention for the desk Crit formative assessment at the Architecture Department of the Beirut Arab University. A studio assessment for the instrument (Tutors/Students) showed that it could promote lifelong learning, helps evaluating as well as achieving ILOS and opens the relative learning/teaching process for accreditation process inspection.
Project
The majority of architecture programmes are still taught face to face, in physical studios on campuses world-wide. The studio tradition is heavily ingrained in architecture education and, although social media is increasingly utilised for informal learning, few architecture schools offer blended or fully online programmes that make use of interactive online settings for learning architectural design. This study is based on a blended undergraduate programme in architecture at a University of Technology in South Africa. The blend comprises of office-based learning, occasional blocks on campus and online learning. The blended offering was designed specifically to broaden access to the architectural profession, by allowing previously disadvantaged, non-traditional and working students to upgrade their qualifications. This study explores how interactive online learning settings can expand studio-type learning, beyond the physical dimension. It focuses on the webinar as a synchronous interactive online learning setting for Socratic learning, together with asynchronous blogs and social media. In these spaces learning happens through interaction of a student with a tutor (teacher), that includes verbal, graphic and multi-media communication. The research is based in a critical realist perspective and draws on Cognitive Apprenticeship (Collins et al., 1989), Kolb’s (1984) Cycle of Experiential Learning and Diana Laurillard’s Conversational Framework (1993, 2002) to explore the relationship between the setting and the role of the tutor, in terms of power relations, the language that is used and the learning that happens. It is a qualitative study, based on a single case, employing Atlas.ti7 to thematically analyse data gathered by means of a focus group discussion with recent graduates, online surveys completed by tutors, students and graduates and protocol analyses of three webinar recording transcripts, including graphics. The themes focus on the methods employed, knowledge displayed and learning activities performed in the webinar setting. It was found that the webinar interaction displays strongest methods of articulation, reflection and exploration, slightly weaker on modelling and weakest on coaching and scaffolding. In this learning setting the tutor took on an expert role, compared to the role of ‘coach’ in the blog and ‘buddy’ in the social media setting. The webinar setting was found to support domain and expert knowledge as well as heuristic and learning strategies. This study not only contributes to our understanding of the webinar as interactive online learning setting for architectural design, but project-, problem and enquiry-based learning more generally. It employs a conceptual framework to explore the nature of online learning interaction in a specific setting, i.e. webinar, but it can be applied to other blended learning settings as well.