Johnny L Boggs

Johnny L Boggs
United States Department of Agriculture | USDA · Forest Service (FS)

About

38
Publications
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Introduction
Johnny L Boggs currently works at the Forest Service (FS) , United States Department of Agriculture. Johnny does research in Hydrology. Their current project is 'The effects of stream crossings on total suspended sediment in North Carolina Piedmont forests'.

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
This paired watershed study tested the effects of timber harvest on water quantity and quality in the North Carolina Piedmont physiographic region. Four headwater watersheds at Hill Demonstration Forest (HF1, HF2, HFW1, and HFW2) and two at Umstead Research Farm (UF1 and UF2) were continuously monitored for discharge and water quality from 2007 to...
Article
Our objectives are (1) to compare tree sap flux density (Js in g cm�2 d�1) and stomatal conductance (Gs in mmolm�2 s�1) across five dominant species, red maple (Acer rubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), and oak species (Quercus spp.), (2) to quantity riparian buffer stand...
Article
Full-text available
Assessment of potential climate change impacts on stream water temperature (Ts) across large scales remains challenging for resource managers because energy exchange processes between the atmosphere and the stream environment are complex and uncertain, and few long-term datasets are available to evaluate changes over time. In this study, we demonst...
Article
In the Piedmont of North Carolina, a traditionally water-rich region, reservoirs that serve over 1 million people are under increasing pressure due to naturally occurring droughts and increasing land development. Innovative development approaches aim to maintain hydrologic conditions of the undisturbed landscape, but are based on insufficient targe...
Article
Water quantity and quality data were compared from six headwater watersheds on two distinct soil formations, Carolina Slate Belt (CSB) and Triassic Basins (TB). CSB soils are generally thicker, less erodible, and contain less clay content than soils found in TB. TB generated significantly more discharge ⁄ precipitation ratio than CSB (0.33 vs. 0.24...
Article
Full-text available
Hurricanes are one of the most significant threats to coastal plain forest ecosystems and urban communities of the southeastern U.S., but their implications for watershed hydrology are unclear. Hurricanes have the potential to alter water balances, causing extensive flooding, biogeochemical cycle disruption, and water quality degradation, saltwater...
Article
Quantifying the spatial variability of species-specific tree transpiration across hillslopes is important for estimating watershed-scale evapotranspiration (ET) and predicting spatial drought effects on vegetation. The objectives of this study are to 1) assess sap flux density (Js) and tree-level transpiration (Ts) across three contrasting zones a(...
Article
Full-text available
Plant transpiration links physiological responses of vegetation to water supply and demand with hydrological, energy, and carbon budgets at the land–atmosphere interface. However, despite being the main land evaporative flux at the global scale, transpiration and its response to environmental drivers are currently not well constrained by observatio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying species-specific tree transpiration across watershed zones is important for estimating watershed evapotranspiration (ET) and predicting drought effects on vegetation. The objectives of this study are to 1) assess sap flux density (Js) and tree-level transpiration (Ts) across three contrasting zones (riparian buffer, mid-hillslope, and u...
Article
Full-text available
Plant transpiration links physiological responses of vegetation to water supply and demand with hydrological,energy and carbon budgets at the land-atmosphere interface. However, despite being the main land evaporative flux at the global scale, transpiration and its response to environmental drivers are currently not well constrained by observations...
Article
Full-text available
A field experiment was established in a high elevation red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) – balsam fir (Abies balsamea) forest on Mount Ascutney Vermont, USA in 1988 to test the nitrogen (N) saturation hypothesis, and to better understand the mechanisms causing forest decline at the time. The study established replicate control, low and high dose nitr...
Article
Full-text available
This study determined total suspended sediment (TSS) at six stream crossings that represented a range of site conditions and forest operations in the Piedmont of North Carolina. Two wood and three steel bridgemats and one culvert were installed to cross the streams. The road classes for the crossings included four temporary skid trails and two perm...
Article
Full-text available
Our objectives are 1) to compare tree sap flux density (Js in g cm-2 d-1), and stomatal conductance (Gs in mmol m-2 s-1) across five dominant species, red maple (Acer rubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), and oak species (Quercus spp.), 2) to quantity riparian buffer stand...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic climate change is a relatively new phenomenon, largely occurring over the past 150 years, and much of the discussion on climate change impacts to forests has focused on long-term shifts in temperature and precipitation. However, individual trees respond to the much shorter impacts of climate variability. Historically, fast growing, fu...
Chapter
Full-text available
Dead fuel loads were measured on six distinct forest management compartments in North Carolina’s Uwharrie national forest, Croatan national forest and the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. Average 1-, 10-, 100- and 1000-hour fuels loads were analyzed within and between each of the three research areas and compared to National Fire Danger Ra...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is altering biogeochemical cycling in forests and interconnected lakes of the northeastern US, and may shift nutrient limitation from N toward other essential elements, such as phosphorus (P). Whether this shift is occurring relative to N deposition gradients across the northeastern US has not been investigated....
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Concerns about influences of nitrogen (N) inputs on New England forest health were first noted in the mid 1980s. In 1988, a series of high elevation red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) plots were established on Mount Ascutney, Vermont to experimentally induce N saturation and document changes in ecosystem functions. The pai...
Article
Full-text available
The ecohydrologic effects of urbanization that is dominated by forests clearing are not well understood in the southeastern United States. We utilized long-term monitoring data to quantify the annual water balance, stormflow characteristics, and seasonal flow patterns of an urbanized watershed (UR) (0·70 km2) and compared it to a fully forested wat...
Article
Land management practices that include species conversion or vegetation manipulation can have consequences to surface water availability, groundwater recharge, streamflow generation, and water quality through altering the transpiration processes in forested watersheds. Our objective in this study is to compare stand water use or transpiration in a...
Article
Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the eco...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The objective of this study is to describe winter and summer surface air and forest floor temperature patterns and diurnal fluctuations in high-elevation red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) forests with different levels of canopy cover. In 1988, a series of 10- x 10-meter plots (control, low nitrogen [N] addition, and high nitrogen addition) were estab...
Article
The study examined the relationships between whole tree hydraulic conductance (K(tree)) and the conductance in roots (K(root)) and leaves (K(leaf)) in loblolly pine trees. In addition, the role of seasonal variations in K(root) and K(leaf) in mediating stomatal control of transpiration and its response to vapour pressure deficit (D) as soil-dried w...
Article
The conversion of wetlands to intensively managed forest lands in eastern North Carolina is widespread and the consequences on water and carbon balances are not well studied. Quantification of evapotranspiration (ET), tree transpiration and their biophysical regulation are needed for assessing forest water management options. We characterized verti...
Article
The conversion of wetlands to intensively managed forest lands in eastern North Carolina is widespread and the consequences on water and carbon balances are not well studied. Quantification of evapotranspiration (ET), tree transpiration and their biophysical regulation are needed for assessing forest water management options. We characterized verti...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have demonstrated that natural abundance (15)N can be a useful tool for assessing nitrogen saturation, because as nitrification and nitrate loss increase, delta(15)N of foliage and soil also increases. We measured foliar delta(15)N at 11 high-elevation spruce-fir stands along an N deposition gradient in 1987-1988 and at seven paired...
Article
We evaluated foliar and forest floor chemistry across a gradient of N deposition in the Northeast at 11 red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) sites in 1987/1988 and foliar and forest floor chemistry and basal area growth at six paired spruce and deciduous sites in 1999. The six red spruce plots were a subset of the original 1987/1988 spruce sites. In 199...
Article
Full-text available
N saturation induced by atmospheric N deposition can have serious consequences for forest health in many regions. In order to evaluate whether foliar δ15N may be a robust, regional-scale measure of the onset of N saturation in forest ecosystems, we assembled a large dataset on atmospheric N deposition, foliar and root δ15N and N concentration, soil...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the effects of N fertilization on forest soil fungal and bacterial biomass at three long-term experiments in New England (Harvard Forest, MA; Mt. Ascutney, VT; Bear Brook, ME). At Harvard Forest, chronic N fertilization has decreased organic soil microbial biomass C (MBC) by an average of 54% and substrate induced respiration (SIR) was...
Article
In the early 1980s, nitrogen (N) deposition was first postulated as a cause of N saturation and spruce mortality across the northeastern US. In 1988, a series of high elevation spruce-fir forest N addition plots were established on Mt. Ascutney (southeastern) Vermont to test this hypothesis. The paired plots each received, in addition to ambient N...
Article
Full-text available
The declining health of high-elevation red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and Fraser fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.) in the southern Appalachian region has long been linked to nitrogen (N) deposition. Recently, N deposition has also been proposed as a source of negative health impacts in lower elevation deciduous forests. In 1998 we established 46 p...
Article
Full-text available
Modern agriculture uses large amounts of organic and in-organic nutrients to optimize productivity. Excessive nutrient applica-tions sometime lead to adverse effects on the environment and human health. Precision agriculture is evolving with the objectives of minimiz-ing these adverse effects by enabling farmers to manage nutrient applica-tions mor...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional farming usually resorts to the use of large amounts of fertilizers and other chemicals to meet the needs for food production. These practices ultimately cause dreadful harm to human lives. Precision agriculture has emerged as a valuable and a promising aid to mitigate these adverse effects by helping farmers increase crop yield while su...
Article
Models are used for numerous application including hydrology. The Modular Modeling System (MMS) is one of the few that can simulate a hydrology process. MMS was tested and used to compare infiltration, soil moisture, daily temperature, and potential and actual evaporation for the Elinsboro sandy loam soil and the Mattapex silty loam soil in the Mic...
Article
Understanding the hydrologic processes is the first step in making sound watershed management decisions including designing Best Management Practices for non-point source pollution control. Over the past fifty years, various forest experimental watersheds have been instrumented across the Carolinas through collaborative studies among federal, state...

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Project (1)
Project
The objectives of this study are to 1) quantify TSS across a range of site conditions (e.g., steep and gentle slopes; clayey and sandy soils) and forestry operational BMPs (i.e., bridgemats, and forest haul road, and skid trail stream crossings) that are used in the Piedmont of NC to protect water quality; and 2) improve our understanding of watershed hydrology and sedimentation related to sustainability of water resources following forest operations.