John C. Green

John C. Green
University of Akron · Department of Political Science

About

68
Publications
6,744
Reads
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2,192
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
803 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120

Publications

Publications (68)
Article
The recent growth of the secular population in the United States has implications for American politics. However, our understanding of these implications has been hindered by oversimplified concepts and measures that equate secularism with non-religion. We separate the two concepts, distinguishing “non-religiosity,” or the absence of religion, from...
Book
American society is rapidly secularizing–a radical departure from its historically high level of religiosity–and politics is a big part of the reason. Just as, forty years ago, the Religious Right arose as a new political movement, today secularism is gaining traction as a distinct and politically energized identity. This book examines the politica...
Article
Parties need to win elections, but they also heed the policy preferences of activists to provide the incentive to mobilize. Moving beyond the debate as to whether parties as a whole are policy or office driven, we examine groups within parties and identify different factions that place differential emphasis on office-seeking versus policy-demanding...
Article
Nearly all research on the political impact of Americans’ religious and secular orientations assumes that such orientations are exogenous to politics. Using multiwave panel and experimental data, we find that religious and secular orientations are endogenous to political orientations. In other words, religion and secularism are a consequence as wel...
Article
Because identification with and affect toward social groups is a primary heuristic for citizens, the social group profiles of candidates are important for electoral behavior. We focus on an increasingly important element of candidates’ social characteristics: their levels of religiosity and secularism. We argue that as religious groups and identiti...
Article
Rumors that President Barack Obama is a Muslim were rampant during the 2008 presidential campaign and continued well into his presidency. These rumors were widely believed, were electorally consequential, and are part of a growing trend of politically motivated misconceptions. Thus, relying principally on the theory of motivated reasoning, we exami...
Article
The public opinion literature shows that cues about the policy positions of social groups influence citizens’ political attitudes. We assess whether cues about religious groups’ positions affect attitudes on three issues: protection of homosexuals in the workplace, improving the socio-economic conditions of African-Americans, and government-provide...
Article
Why did Mitt Romney face antagonism toward his Mormon religion in the 2008 election? Using experiments conducted in the real time of the campaign, we test voters’ reactions to information about Romney’s religious background. We find that voters were concerned specifically with Romney’s religious affiliation, not simply with the fact that he is reli...
Article
In this paper, we extend the analysis of the electoral importance of candidates' socio-demographic backgrounds by analyzing experimental data on the impact of cues about the religious, racial, and partisan background of a hypothetical Muslim candidate.The level of ethnocentrism is the major force in shaping the likelihood of voting for Muslim candi...
Article
We argue that the factors shaping the impact of partisanship on vote choice—“partisan voting”—depend on the nature of party identification. Because party identification is partly based on images of the social group characteristics of the parties, the social profiles of political candidates should affect levels of partisan voting. A candidate's reli...
Article
Party activists have played a leading role in “conflict extension”—the polarization of the parties along multiple issue dimensions—in contemporary American politics. We argue that open nomination systems and the ambitious politicians competing within those systems encourage activists with extreme views on a variety of issue dimensions to become inv...
Article
There is no question that racial and ethnic attitudes did matter in the 2008 presidential election. However, as the country elected its first black president, it was not feelings about African-Americans that were most important. Instead, it was attitudes toward Muslims, Arabs, and societal outgroups in general that seemed to be of greatest conseque...
Chapter
As the 2004 presidential campaign began, some analysts and political strategists pondered whether evangelical Protestants’ enthusiasm for political engagement might be waning. After all, during the past century, evangelicals have exhibited a cyclical pattern of political engagement and then withdrawal. And now a quarter-century has passed since the...
Article
Political scientists have increasingly viewed party activists as important catalysts for party behavior and change in American politics. Understanding the decisionmaking norms of these activists should help inform scholars' broader understanding of party performance. We examine the norms of party decisionmaking expressed by a select group of party...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we examine the impact of religious variables on the vote in the 2004 pres- idential election. First, we review and evaluate two theories that underlie many interpretations of religion's role in American electoral politics, namely, the ethnoreligious and the religious restructuring perspectives. Using both approaches, we deploy a co...
Article
A heated scholarly debate rages over the ‘culture wars thesis’ in American politics. Drawing on the literature on mass opinion constraint and its sources, we propose a resolution to this debate: the culture wars influence mass political behaviour in special religious, policy and political contexts where logical, psychological, social and electoral...
Article
Until recently the impact of faith on foreign policy has gone largely unnoticed by the mainstream public and media. Observers are divided as to whether it is primarily religious traditionalists or progressives that are shaping US foreign policy. Theauthors' survey of religious groups' attitudes towards US foreign policy and the Bush Doctrine reveal...
Article
Objective. This study examines the backgrounds, political attitudes, issue preferences, and political participation of congressional donors who contribute $200 or more to congressional campaigns. Methods. We use a nationwide survey of more than 1,000 donors and analyze differences among these individuals using cluster analysis. Results. Although th...
Article
The Willow Creek Association (WCA), a loose association of some 8,000 churches with a common interest in evangelizing using the “seeker” model pioneered by the Willow Creek Community Church, is a good example of a postmodern religious association. A survey of clergy whose churches belong to WCA reveals the membership of the WCA to be diverse, with...
Article
Cozy Politics: Political Parties, Campaign Finance, and Compromised Governance. By Peter Kobrak. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2002. 273p. $55.00 cloth, $22.50 paper - - Volume 1 Issue 2 - John C. Green
Article
Christian Right Organizations in the 1990s have tried to avoid the pitfalls for the religious particularism that undermined the earlier efforts of such groups as Moral Majority to build long lasting political coalitions. For many Christian Right leaders, conservative Catholics appear to be a particularly appealing group to reach for membership recr...
Article
This paper explores the uneasy relationship between social movements and major political parties by considering the case of the Christian Right and the Republican Party in the 1994 elections. We look at four states where the movement was active in party politics and where Republican electoral fortunes varied from failure to success. We found that t...
Article
Full-text available
Christian Right organizations in the 1990s have tried to avoid the pitfalls of the religious particularism that undermined the earlier efforts of such groups as the Moral Majority to build long lasting political coalitions. For many Christian Right leaders, conservative Catholics appear to be a particularly appealing group to reach for membership r...
Article
Full-text available
Conservative Christian theology contains a set of beliefs that run counter to the philosophy supporting environmentalism. Conservative eschatology (Biblical literalism, End Times thinking), religious tradition, and religious commitment should be negatively related to support for environmental policy. Using data from four national surveys of clergy,...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the political alignment and voting behavior of major American religious traditions in 1992. We discover that evangelical Protestants solidified their growing Republican proclivities of recent decades, becoming a core voting bloc within the GOP coalition. Mainline Protestants, traditionally at the center of the Republican party...
Article
Using data from a survey of activists (N = 4,995) from several large religious interest groups, we analyze the impact of theological orientations on attitudes toward the environment. We find that doctrinal fundamentalism, carefully defined, is a powerful predictor of environmental preferences. We also discover that views on environmental policy are...
Article
Here we assess the involvement of the Christian Right in recent congressional campaigns from three theoretical perspectives: the “demand” for Christian Right activism, the “supply” of resources for such activism, and “strategic choice” in the deployment of such resources. We find that the Christian Right was most active, and apparently successful,...
Article
In this survey of activists (N = 4,995) from several large religious interest groups, the demographic, religious, and ideological influences on attitudes toward abortion are analyzed. Findings indicate that detailed denominational, doctrinal, and religious practice items are powerful predictors of abortion attitudes among a demographically homogene...
Article
Part 1 Religion and politics in 1988: religion in the 1988 presidential campaign, Allen D. Hertzke. Part 2 Religious elites and politics: protestant leaders and the 1988 campaign, Anne M. Hallum Catholic leaders and the 1988 campaign, Mary T. Hanna Jewish leaders and the 1988 campaign, Carl Lieberman. Part 3 Religion and political activism: the pro...
Article
This paper examines support for civil liberties among a large and diverse set of political activists during the Reagan era: financial donors to party and political action committees (PACs). While these activists are more tolerant than the mass public, support for civil liberties is not evenly distributed among them. Liberals and Democrats are far m...
Article
The North Shore Volcanic Group, a thick sequence of plateau lavas of Keweenawan (Proterozoic, 1100 m.y.) age, was erupted during the development of the Midcontinent Rift of North America. It contains many well-exposed physical features that imply a range of eruptive styles and flow mechanisms. Viscosities calculated from 183 chemical analyses corre...
Article
Explanations for the wide gap between strong public support for school prayer and lack of support in Congress have focused on the attributes of the public. Here another important explicand is investigated: the characteristics of political activists. We find that activist opinion more nearly matches congressional behavior on school prayer than does...
Article
Using the results of an extensive mail survey of donors to Republican presidential candidate and party committees, we compare contributors to Pat Robertson's campaign with donors to right-wing and mainstream Republican committees. While measures of salience, ideology, religiosity, demography and partisanship show Robertson supporters to be distinct...
Article
This article investigates the influence of religiosity on one group of political activists: party and PAC contributors. We find that the religious tend to cluster in conservative PACs and the Republican party, and more secular activists prefer liberal PACs and the Democratic party. At the individual level, as well, religiosity is associated with po...
Article
This paper uses experiments to test voters’ reactions when liberal issue positions on the environment (global warming) and capital punishment are framed in religious language. We ran two experiments. In the first experiment, voters evaluated a single (hypothetical) candidate, and we manipulated whether that candidate used a religious or secular rat...
Article
Party scholarship suggests that the two major political parties have recently gone through a pattern of "decline" and "resurgence" in their relevance to American politics. Numerous factors have been advanced to explain this changing relevance of parties, but there is currently no compelling theory of parties that explains this entire cycle. One exp...