John Andrew Vucetich

John Andrew Vucetich
Michigan Technological University | MTU · School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science

PhD

About

213
Publications
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6,436
Citations

Publications

Publications (213)
Article
Providing sufficient benefits to local people can be an important component of effective and equitable conservation, especially where local communities face substantial opportunity costs or disbenefits from conservation. However, the distribution of benefits to local people is often inadequate or inequitable. In this study we investigated the heter...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Endangered Species Act (ESA) defines an endangered species as being "in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range…" (16 U.S.C. § 1532). The phrase "significant portion of its range" (SPR) has received considerable attention by academics, policy makers, and the courts. The Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has devel...
Preprint
Island ecosystems provide models to assess the impacts of isolation on population persistence. However, most studies of persistence have focused on a single species, without comparisons to other organisms they interact with in the ecosystem. The simple predator-prey system of moose and gray wolves on Isle Royale provides allows a direct contrast of...
Article
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It is widely accepted that predators disproportionately prey on individuals that are old, weak, diseased or injured. By selectively removing individuals with diseases, predators may play an important role in regulating the overall health of prey populations. However, that idea is seldom tested empirically. Here we assess the extent that wolves (Can...
Technical Report
Full-text available
[We invite feedback on this report. Send to: Bruskotter.9@osu.edu] In three book chapters written in the mid-1990s, Geist (1995a,b,c) reviewed historical developments in wildlife conservation in North America with the aim of isolating “key, enabling policies affecting wildlife” (Geist 1995a, p.11). Those ideas were further consolidated in Geist et...
Article
A fundamental question about the ecology of herbivore populations pertains to the relative influence of biotic and abiotic processes on nutritional condition. Nutritional condition is influenced in important, yet poorly understood, ways by plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) which can adversely affect a herbivore's physiology and energetics. Here we...
Article
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The gray wolf (Canis lupus) population of Isle Royale National Park suffered an extreme population decline where by 2017 only two wolves that were both half-siblings and a father-daughter pair remained with low probability of producing viable young. This precipitous decline was in part due to the negative fitness consequences associated with inbree...
Article
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Climate change is expected to modify host-parasite interactions which is concerning because parasites are involved in most food-web links, and parasites have important influences on the structure, productivity and stability of communities and ecosystems. However, the impact of climate change on host–parasite interactions and any cascading effects o...
Preprint
Although loss of genetic fitness is known to be severely detrimental to the viability of populations, little is known about how changes in the genetic fitness of keystone species can impact the functioning of communities and ecosystems. Here we assessed how changes in the genetic fitness of a keystone predator, grey wolves, impacted the ecosystem o...
Article
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Two vital policy aims—biodiversity conservation and food production—are increasingly in conflict. Efforts to evaluate trade‐offs between agriculture and conservation have shaped scholarly discourse around two broad strategies to agricultural production that seek to either “share” land with biodiversity or “spare” land from agriculture. However, eff...
Article
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There is considerable interest in improving participatory governance in decision-making processes for the conservation of biodiversity and management of conflicts between humans and wildlife. Among the various modes of participatory governance, deliberative democracy has received virtually no attention for decisions focused on conserving biodiversi...
Article
Many species exhibit selective foraging behaviour, where consumers use a nonrandom subset of available food types. Yet little is known about how selective foraging behaviour varies with environmental conditions and the community level consequences of such selection dynamics. We examined selective foraging by wolves preying primarily on elk in Yello...
Article
To better understand winter foraging patterns of Odocoileus virginianus (White-tailed Deer) in the context of global change, we assessed foraging trends using microhistological analysis of fecal pellets from 2006–2018 across a network of monitoring plots in 39 relict Tsuga canadensis (Eastern Hemlock) stands in the western Upper Peninsula of Michig...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This letter explains why gray wolves in the conterminous U.S. states should continue to be listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.
Article
An important line of scholarship concludes that stemming the biodiversity crisis requires widespread nonanthropocentric modes of action and decision-making. In this regard, knowing what would even constitute a nonanthropocentric economic decision-making framework is hobbled by failing to recognize a conflation in the taxonomy of capital as supposed...
Article
Aspirations for human-nature relationships involve values that are widely embraced, yet often compete with one another. As such, there is need to understand how individuals prioritize competing values pertaining to human-nature relationships. To quantify individuals' affinity for those conservation priorities, we developed a survey instrument askin...
Article
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Averting the biodiversity crisis requires closing a gap between how humans tend to behave, individually and collectively, and how we ought to behave—“ought to” in the sense of behaviors required to avert the biodiversity crisis. Closing that gap requires synthesizing insight from ethics with insights from social and behavioral sciences. This articl...
Article
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Poster
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Background Digestion and detoxification of plant secondary compounds is associated with important microbial interactions in the guts of mammalian herbivores. A population of Moose on the Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior (Keweenaw County, Michigan) is divided into 2 subpopulations based on location (East vs. West). These subpopulations exp...
Article
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According to the ideal‐free distribution (IFD), individuals within a population are free to select habitats that maximize their chances of success. Assuming knowledge of habitat quality, the IFD predicts that average fitness will be approximately equal among individuals and between habitats, while density varies, implying that habitat selection wil...
Article
Several recent papers have reinvigorated a chronic concern about the need for ecological science to focus more on long-term research. For a few decades, significant voices among ecologists have been assembling elements of a case in favor of long-term ecological research. In this article and for the first time, we synthesize the elements of this cas...
Article
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Judgments about acceptable risk in the context of policy may be influenced by law makers, policy makers, experts and the general public. While significant effort has been made to understand public attitudes on acceptable risk of environmental pollution, little is known about such attitudes in the context of species' endangerment. We present survey...
Article
Recent debate among scholars reveals potential rifts in the conservation community concerning the moral bases of conservation, and the nature of humanity's obligations to nature. We reasoned that conflict within the conservation community could stem both from divergent values and identification with relevant interest groups. We used secondary data...
Article
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Exceptionally high rates of tooth fracture in large Pleistocene carnivorans imply intensified interspecific competition, given that tooth fracture rises with increased bone consumption, a behavior that likely occurs when prey are difficult to acquire. To assess the link between prey availability and dental attrition, we documented dental fracture r...
Article
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Public reason is a formal concept in political theory. There is a need to better understand how public reason might be elicited in making public decisions that involve deep uncertainty, which arises from pernicious and gross ignorance about how a system works, the boundaries of a system, and the relative value (or disvalue) of various possible outc...
Article
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1 Temporal fluctuations in growth rates can arise from both variation in age‐specific vital rates and temporal fluctuations in age structure (i.e., the relative abundance of individuals in each age‐class). However, empirical assessments of temporal fluctuations in age structure and their effects on population growth rate are rare. Most research has...
Preprint
Full-text available
Exceptionally high rates of tooth fracture in large Pleistocene carnivorans imply intensified interspecific competition, given that tooth fracture rises with increased bone consumption, a behavior that likely occurs when prey are difficult to acquire. To assess the link between prey availability and dental attrition, we documented dental fracture r...
Article
1.Resource selection is widely appreciated to be context‐dependent and shaped by both biological and abiotic factors. However, few studies have empirically assessed the extent to which selective foraging behaviour is dynamic and varies in response to environmental conditions for free‐ranging animal populations. 2.Here, we assessed the extent that f...
Article
Wild lions are threatened by loss of habitat and prey and various forms of human-caused mortality. Despite examples of locally effective lion conservation, many populations have declined drastically over recent decades, and prospects for averting those threats over the long-term and at large spatial scales are not especially bright. Yet, many maint...
Chapter
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Wildlife conservation in the Anthropocene means there is a pressing need to find ways for wildlife and humans to share landscapes. However, this is challenging due to the complex interactions that occur within social-ecological systems (SES). This challenge is exemplified by grey wolf management in the American West, where human governance systems...
Article
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The observation that small isolated populations often suffer reduced fitness from inbreeding depression has guided conservation theory and practice for decades. However, investigating the genome-wide dynamics associated with inbreeding depression in natural populations is only now feasible with relatively inexpensive sequencing technology and annot...
Article
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Conservation and natural resource management are increasingly attending the ethical elements of public decisions. Ethical considerations are challenging, in part, because they typically require accounting for the moral consideration of various human and nonhuman forms of life, whose interests sometimes conflict (or seem to conflict). A valuable too...
Article
Genetic factors have long been a concern in the extinction and viability of species with the short‐term effects focusing on inbreeding depression. Genetic rescue has been suggested as a means to overcome the detrimental effects of inbreeding depression. However, it has been difficult to document the genetic dynamics over time of genetic rescue, inb...
Article
Full-text available
Physiological stress in wildlife can be a useful indicator of a population’s response to environmental factors. By using non-invasive endocrinological techniques, such as fecal sampling, potential confounding factors associated with the stress of capture can be avoided. A potential drawback of fecal sampling, however, is degradation of samples whic...
Article
In recent years the conservation community has engaged in debate over value in nonhuman nature, especially as it relates to motivations for conservation. Many have expressed the assumption that more people are willing to support conservation when emphasis is placed on the human benefits of nonhuman nature, rather than the value of nonhuman nature f...
Preprint
Full-text available
The observation that small, isolated populations often suffer reduced fitness as a result of inbreeding depression has guided conservation theory and practice for decades. However, investigating the genome-wide dynamics associated with inbreeding depression in natural populations is only now feasible with relatively inexpensive sequencing technolog...
Article
Full-text available
To understand how foraging decisions impact individual fitness of herbivores, nutritional ecologists must consider the complex in vivo dynamics of nutrient–nutrient interactions and nutrient–toxin interactions associated with foraging. Mathematical modeling has long been used to make foraging predictions (e.g. optimal foraging theory) but has large...
Article
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Cambridge Core - Prehistory - Traditional Ecological Knowledge - edited by Melissa K. Nelson
Article
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Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/conl.12595 We used data from a 2014 survey (n = 1,287) of U.S. residents and recent polls to assess how public support for the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) changed over time, and whether protecting controversial species affects support for the law. We assessed support for the ESA, trust i...
Article
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Link to article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000632071732116X | Efforts to realize conservation are often met with stakeholders contending that particular conservation actions are unfair for conflicting with their basic interests. A useful lens through which to view such conflict is social justice, which may be considered t...
Article
Despite the importance of body size for individual fitness, population dynamics and community dynamics, the influence of climate change on growth and body size is inadequately understood, particularly for long-lived vertebrates. Although temporal trends in body size have been documented, it remains unclear whether these changes represent the advers...
Article
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Suggested citation: Vucetich, J.A. 2017. "Are humans and nature fundamentally one and the same?" Center for Humans and Nature, 18 Aug 2017. https://www.humansandnature.org/are-humans-and-nature-fundamentally-one-and-the-same As the twentieth century turned, Frederic Clements revolutionized the science of ecology with a new technique known as the...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The HELP for Wildlife Act is that it is Trojan horse and should be opposed or amended. It includes some positive provisions, but its most important effect would be to undermine the Endangered Species Act and subvert wolf conservation. Wolves are valuable to ecosystems. Most Americans also recognize that wildlife – including wolves – possess value i...
Article
Large carnivores are threatened worldwide by a variety of human-driven factors, including persecution, which regularly results when they come into conflict with people. Although human activities are almost universally viewed as negatively affecting carnivore conservation, we contend that conservation outcomes for carnivores are improved when social...
Article
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Conservation triage, as a concept, seems to have been born from analogizing circumstances that characterize conservation with triage, as the concept applies to emergency medicine. Careful consideration—facilitated through the aid of formal argumentation—demonstrates the critical limitations of the analogy. Those limitations reveal how the concept o...
Article
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Allen and colleagues contend that the study designs used to test for indirect effects of large carnivores on lower trophic levels are limited insomuch as they “rely on weak inference when valuing the roles of large carnivores in ecosystems.” Based upon their review of gray wolf and dingo studies, they conclude “that evidence for the ecological role...
Article
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Measures of reproductive success have been recognized in many fields as essential tools to assess the status of populations, species, and communities. However, difficulties in gathering data on reproductive success often prevent researchers from taking advantage of the information offered by those measures. For example, most of habitat selection st...
Article
Full-text available
Details surrounding any particular instance of predator control are varied. Addressing the appropriateness of predator control requires attention to those details. Here, we focus on the case of wolf (Canis lupus) hunting in Michigan. In Michigan, wolves were removed from the list of United States endangered species in December 2011. By June 2013, p...
Article
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In our recent perspective article, we noted that most (approximately 0 percent) terrestrial large carnivore and large herbivore species are now threatened with extinction, and we offered a 13-point declaration designed to promote and guide actions to save these iconic mammalian megafauna (Ripple et al. 2016). Some may worry that a focus on saving m...
Article
Inbreeding, relatedness, and ancestry have traditionally been estimated with pedigree information, however, molecular genomic data can provide more detailed examination of these properties. For example, pedigree information provides estimation of the expected value of these measures but molecular genomic data can estimate the realized values of the...
Article
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From the late Pleistocene to the Holocene and now the so-called Anthropocene, humans have been driving an ongoing series of species declines and extinctions (Dirzo et al. 2014). Large-bodied mammals are typically at a higher risk of extinction than smaller ones (Cardillo et al. 2005). However, in some circumstances, terrestrial megafauna population...
Article
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The US Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service (the Services) have struggled to understand the meaning of the definition of 'endangered species' within the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. This struggle centers on how the Services should interpret the phrase 'significant portion of its range' (SPOIR), which is part of t...
Article
Full-text available
When consuming plants, herbivores must deal with both low nutritional quality from cell wall constituents and potentially toxic plant secondary metabolites, which are often inversely related. Herbivores that consume a highly nutritious, but chemically defended plant, may consume high levels of toxins that require energy for detoxification. Alternat...
Article
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Though the conservation community has long premised its moral foundations on consequentialist thinking, and has embraced a dualistic worldview severing reason from emotion, the conservation community has erred by failing to address – or even acknowledge – the limitations of these fundamental tenets. This failure reemerged in 2015 when a wealthy hun...
Research
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This letter rebuts a letter by scientists that advocated the removal of wolves in the Great Lakes from federal Endangered Species Act protections.