John Teem

John Teem
Genetic Biocontrols LLC

Ph.D.

About

35
Publications
5,036
Reads
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2,079
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
420 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - June 2019
ILSI Research Foundation
Position
  • Senior Researcher
Description
  • Organizer of scientific meetings that address risk assessment for genetically modified plants and insects.
July 2003 - October 2016
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Genetic approaches for the control of aquatic invasive species. Use of a Trojan Y Chromosome approach to eradicate invasive fish.
December 1995 - June 2002
Florida State University
Description
  • Correction of Chloride Channel Dysfunction in Cystic Fibrosis
Education
September 1978 - May 1984
Brandeis University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Building on an exercise that identified potential harms from simulated investigational releases of a population suppression gene drive for malaria vector control, a series of online workshops identified nine recommendations to advance future environmental risk assessment of gene drive applications.
Article
Full-text available
Historically, genetically engineered (GE) plants that have incorporated genes conferring insect protection have primarily used Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to achieve their insecticidal phenotype. As a result, regulators have developed a level of familiarity and confidence in reviewing plants incorporating these insecticida...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species are increasingly affecting agriculture, food, fisheries, and forestry resources throughout the world. As a result of global trade, invasive species are often introduced into new environments where they become established and cause harm to human health, agriculture, and the environment. Prevention of new introductions is a high prio...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Gene drive mosquitoes have been proposed as a possible means to reduce the transmission of malaria in Africa. Because this technology has no prior use-history at this time, environmental risk assessments for gene drive mosquitoes will benefit from problem formulation-an organized and ordered process to identify protection goals and pot...
Article
Full-text available
Nonindigenous apple snails, Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), are currently spreading rapidly through the southeastern United States. This mollusk serves as an intermediate host of the rat lungworm parasite (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), which can cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans who consume infected mollusks. A PCR-based detect...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic options for the control of invasive fishes were recently reviewed and synthesized at a 2010 international symposium, held in Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN, USA. The only option currently available “off-the-shelf” is triploidy, which can be used to produce sterile males for a release program analogous to those widely and successfully used for bio...
Article
Two autocidal genetic biocontrol methods have been proposed as a means to eliminate invasive fish by changing the sex ratio of the population: the Trojan Y Chromosome (TYC) strategy and the Daughterless Carp (DC) strategy. Both strategies were modeled using ordinary differential equations that allow the kinetics of female decline to be assessed und...
Article
The Trojan Y chromosome (TYC) strategy and the daughterless carp (DC) strategy represent two autocidal genetic biocontrol methods for eliminating invasive fish by changing the sex ratio of the population. Each strategy is designed to reduce the number of females in a target population, ultimately leading to local extinction of the population. In th...
Article
Full-text available
In a concluding session of the workshop, the participants developed a list of 115 research and outreach needs, outlining the top 5-7 needs in each of 8 areas (Table). For complete information, including presenter details and abstracts, visit the workshop website at www.hawaii.edu/cowielab/Angio%20website%20home.htm.
Article
Full-text available
The use of Trojan Y chromosomes has been proposed as a genetic strategy for the eradication of invasive species. The strategy is particularly relevant to invasive fish species that have XY sex determination system and are amenable to sex-reversal. In this paper we study the dynamics of an invasive fish population occupying a dendritic domain in whi...
Chapter
Full-text available
The directed extinction of an exotic fish population is proposed using a genetic approach to drastically reduce the ratio of females to males within the population. In the proposed strategy, sex-reversed female fish containing two Y chromosomes (Fyy) are introduced into a normal fish population. The frequencies of each of the four expected genotype...
Article
Full-text available
Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common cause of human eosinophilic meningitis. Humans become infected by ingesting food items contaminated with third-stage larvae that develop in mollusks. We report the development of a real-time PCR assay for the species-specific identification of A. cantonensis in mollusk tissue.
Article
Full-text available
A novel means of inducing extinction of an exotic fish population is proposed using a genetic approach to shift the ratio of male to females within a population. In the proposed strategy, sex-reversed fish containing two Y chromosomes are introduced into a normal fish population. These YY fish result in the production of a disproportionate number o...
Article
Full-text available
The gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a phosphorylation- and nucleotide-regulated chloride channel, is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Deletion of a phenylalanine at amino acid position 508 (ΔF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain...
Article
Full-text available
Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a chloride channel localized at the plasma membrane of diverse epithelia. The most common mutation leading to CF, Delta F508, occurs in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR. The Delta F508 mutation disrupts...
Article
The most common cystic fibrosis mutation deletes phenylalanine 508 in CFTR (CFTR-F508). This mutation causes the loss of CFTR Cl- channel activity by disrupting biosynthetic processing so that mutant protein does not reach the plasma membrane. It also decreases the rate at which mutant channels open. To identify second-site mutations that could rev...
Article
Full-text available
The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an essential protein that is required to establish cellular membrane potential and maintain a normal internal pH. An Asp-378 to Asn substitution at the residue phosphorylated during catalysis is dominant lethal when the pma1-D378N mutation is expressed along with a wild-type plasma memb...
Article
Mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis; the most common mutation is deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (delta F508). We constructed STE6-CFTR chimeras with portions of the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of the yeast STE6 a-factor transporter replaced by port...
Article
Full-text available
To study the regulation of ribosomal protein genes, we constructed a 'lacZ fusion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RP51A gene, containing the first 64 codons of RP51A. In a strain lacking an intact RP51A gene (cells are viable due to the presence of an active RP51B gene), beta-galactosidase activity is 10-fold greater than in a strain containing RP5...
Article
To study the regulation of ribosomal protein genes, we constructed a 'lacZ fusion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RP51A gene, containing the first 64 codons of RP51A. In a strain lacking an intact RP51A gene (cells are viable due to the presence of an active RP51B gene), beta-galactosidase activity is 10-fold greater than in a strain containing RP5...
Article
Full-text available
We placed a regulatory sequence derived from the GAL10 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at various distances from the start sites of transcription of two yeast ribosomal protein genes, tcm1 and cyh2. The hybrid ribosomal protein genes were transcribed at wild-type levels in the presence of galactose. In the absence of galactose, the hybrid genes w...
Article
We placed a regulatory sequence derived from the GAL10 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at various distances from the start sites of transcription of two yeast ribosomal protein genes, tcm1 and cyh2. The hybrid ribosomal protein genes were transcribed at wild-type levels in the presence of galactose. In the absence of galactose, the hybrid genes w...
Article
Full-text available
The DNA sequences of eight yeast ribosomal protein genes have been compared for the purpose of identifying homologous regions which may be involved in the coordinate regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis. A 12 bp homology was identified in the 5′ DNA sequence preceding the stuctural gene for 6 out of 8 yeast ribosomal protein genes. In each cas...
Article
Sequence comparison of the introns of two yeast genes (rp51A and rp51B) coding for the same ribosomal protein shows homology only in the last 50 bases of the intron. This region of the intron contains an internal conserved sequence (ICS) present near the 3' end of all sequenced yeast nuclear mRNA introns. Removal of a 29 bp sequence containing the...
Article
The temperature sensitive rna2 mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes a rapid and dramatic decrease in the abundance of most ribosomal protein mRNAs [6, 14]. We and others have recently shown that the processing of ribosomal protein mRNAs is defective at the nonpermissive temperature, suggesting that inefficient mRNA processing might be respon...
Article
Full-text available
The temperature-sensitive mutation rna2 causes the accumulation of higher molecular weight transcripts from the ribosomal protein 51 (rp51) gene of yeast and many other yeast ribosomal protein genes. We have determined the DNA sequence of the rp51 gene, confirming that it contains an intron and that the higher molecular weight transcript is an intr...
Article
The levels of four ribosomal protein (rp) mRNAs in different mutant strains were determined by hydridization of radiolabeled cloned genes to RNA fractionated on CH3HgOH gels and transferred to DBM paper. Two ribosomal protein genes (rp 51 and rp 52) controlled by the locus RNA2 have dramatically decreased mRNA levels after a shift-up to the nonperm...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Brandeis University, 1983. "UMI: 8420795." Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-217). Photocopy.

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Project (1)
Project
Prevalence and Intensity of A. cantonensis in endemic terrestrial gastropods; Association between infected gastropods and human population