John Robert Davis

John Robert Davis
The Francis Crick Institute · Tapon Group

About

15
Publications
1,827
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317
Citations
Introduction
John Robert Davis is a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow in Nic Tapon's group at the Francis Crick Institute. He is interested in three main themes: how mechanical cues can influence cell behaviour, how cells adapt to these cues and whether mechanical cues can influence how cells respond to other stimuli. His work mainly focuses on microscopy techniques, imaging in vivo and in vitro systems that can be mechanically manipulated.
Additional affiliations
April 2015 - present
The Francis Crick Institute
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2014 - April 2015
Cancer Research UK
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2010 - September 2014
King's College London
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Cell migration is hypothesized to involve a cycle of behaviours beginning with leading edge extension. However, recent evidence suggests that the leading edge may be dispensable for migration, raising the question of what actually controls cell directionality. Here, we exploit the embryonic migration of Drosophila macrophages to bridge the differen...
Article
Full-text available
Epithelial tissues can elongate in two dimensions by polarized cell intercalation, oriented cell division, or cell shape change, owing to local or global actomyosin contractile forces acting in the plane of the tissue. In addition, epithelia can undergo morphogenetic change in three dimensions. We show that elongation of the wings and legs of Droso...
Data
Video S3. Rosette Resolution and Shape Cell Change during Wing Convergent Extension, Related to Figures 3D and S2A Apical sections of epithelial wing disc cells expressing E-cad-GFP were filmed from 4 hr 30 min hr APF. Scale bar, 5 μm.
Data
Video S4. Cell Shape Change during Wing Convergent Extension, Related to Figure 3D Apical sections of epithelial wing cells expressing E-cad-GFP were filmed from 4 hr 30min hr APF. Scale bar, 5 μm.
Data
Video S1. Wing Convergent Extension and Expansion, Related to Figures 3A, S2A, and S2C Wing expressing E-cad-GFP was filmed from 4 hr 30 min APF for convergent extension (top) and from 6 hr APF for expansion (bottom). Scale bar, 50 μm.
Data
Video S2. T1 Resolution during Wing Convergent Extension, Related to Figures 3D and S2A Apical sections of epithelial wing disc cells expressing E-cad-GFP were filmed from 4 hr 30 min hr APF. Scale bar, 5μm.
Data
Video S5. Isotropic Epithelial Cell Shape Growth during Wing Disc Expansion, Related to Figure 3E Apical sections of epithelial wing disc cells expressing E-cad-GFP were filmed from 6 hr APF. Scale bar, 10 μm.
Data
Video S6. High-Magnification View of Convergent Extension, Entire Wing View, Related to Video S1 and Figure 3A Apical sections of epithelial wing cells expressing E-cad-GFP were filmed from 4 hr 30min APF. Wing disc elongation is less pronounced that the observed in less toxic live-imaging conditions (see Video S1 and Figure 3A) or in fixed sample...
Data
Video S7. Time Lapse of Control and Rok-Inhibitor-Treated Wing Discs, Related to Figure 4D, Top sqhAX3; {sqh-GFP} wing discs were filmed from 4 hr 30 min with and without Rok-inhibitor treatment (Y-27632). Treated wings fail to converge or extend, and instead expand isotropically to a rounded shape. Scale bar, 50 μm.
Article
Full-text available
Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is a multifaceted process that causes many cell types to repel each other upon collision. During development, this seemingly uncoordinated reaction is a critical driver of cellular dispersion within embryonic tissues. Here, we show that Drosophila hemocytes require a precisely orchestrated CIL response for the...
Article
The cellular reaction called contact inhibition of locomotion was initially characterised by Michael Abercrombie more than 60 years ago. In his most general definition, it is defined as the stopping of the continued locomotion of a cell in the direction which has produced a collision with another cell. This deceptively simple response has been wide...
Article
Full-text available
The pioneering cell biologist Michael Abercrombie first described the process of contact inhibition of locomotion more than 50 years ago when migrating fibroblasts were observed to rapidly change direction and migrate away upon collision. Since then, we have gleaned little understanding of how contact inhibition is regulated and only lately observe...

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