John Pucher

John Pucher
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey | Rutgers · Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy

About

146
Publications
123,228
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
11,691
Citations

Publications

Publications (146)
Article
Vienna, Austria reduced the car share of trips by a third between 1993 and 2014: from 40% to 27%. The key to Vienna's success has been a coordinated package of mutually reinforcing transport and land-use policies that have made car use slower, less convenient, and more costly, while improving conditions for walking, cycling, and public transport. D...
Article
This article examines the impact of COVID-19 on cycling levels and government policies toward cycling over the period 2019 to 2021. We analyze national aggregate data from automatic bicycle counters for 13 countries in Europe and North America to determine month-by-month and year-to-year changes in cycling levels in 2020 and 2021 compared to 2019....
Article
Using official national data for each country, this article calculates trends in walking and cycling fatalities per capita and per km in the USA, the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and Denmark. From 1990 to 2018, pedestrian fatalities per capita fell by 23% in the USA vs. 66%–80% in the other countries; cyclist fatalities per capita fell by 22% in t...
Article
Introduction Research shows that walking and cycling are sustainable means of travel that contribute to improved physical, mental, and social health. Those documented benefits justify the increased investment by federal, state, and local governments in walking and cycling infrastructure and programs in the United States, especially since 2000. This...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the world, urban areas have been rapidly expanding, exacerbating the problem of many public transport (PT) operators providing service over different governmental jurisdictions. Over the past five decades, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland have successfully implemented regional PT associations (called Verkehrsverbund or VV), which integr...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the boom in cycling research and publications that has accompanied the rapid growth in cycling infrastructure and cycling levels in Western Europe and the Americas. It shows that cycling levels at least tripled or quadrupled in 20 large cities while cycling safety has improved in almost all countries, with falling rates of cyc...
Article
Cycling is the most sustainable urban transport mode, feasible not only for short trips but also for medium-distance trips too long to cover by walking. Cycling causes virtually no environmental damage, promotes health through physical activity, takes up little space, and is economical, both in direct user costs and public infrastructure costs. In...
Article
Full-text available
TRENDS IN WALKING AND CYCLING SAFETY IN HIGH-INCOME COUNTRIES, WITH A FOCUS ON GERMANY AND THE USA URL open access link to full article: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/pdf/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303546 ABSTRACT: Objectives. To examine changes in pedestrian and cyclist fatalities per capita (1990–2014) and per kilometer (2000–2010) in selected high...
Article
Full-text available
Vienna, Austria reduced the car share of trips by a third between 1993 and 2014: from 40% to 27%. The key to Vienna's success has been a coordinated package of mutually reinforcing transport and land-use policies that have made car use slower, less convenient, and more costly, while improving conditions for walking, cycling, and public transport. D...
Article
Full-text available
Vienna, Austria reduced the car share of trips by a third between 1993 and 2014: from 40% to 27%. The key to Vienna's success has been a coordinated package of mutually reinforcing transport and land-use policies that have made car use slower, less convenient, and more costly, while improving conditions for walking, cycling, and public transport. D...
Article
Full-text available
Vienna, Austria reduced the car share of trips by a third between 1993 and 2014: from 40% to 27%. The key to Vienna’s success has been a coordinated package of mutually reinforcing transport and land-use policies that have made car use slower, less convenient, and more costly, while improving conditions for walking, cycling, and public transport. D...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To examine changes in pedestrian and cyclist fatalities per capita (1990-2014) and per kilometer (2000-2010) in selected high-income countries, and in fatalities and serious injuries per kilometer by age in the United States and Germany (2001-2009). Methods: We used Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development data to estima...
Article
Full-text available
It is crucial to improve cycling safety in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s injury statistics Web site (WISQARS) reports that in 2014, there were 902 cyclist fatalities and 35 206 serious cyclist injuries (requiring hospitalization). The United States has much higher fatality and serious injury rates per kilometer...
Article
Full-text available
Munich, Berlin, Hamburg, Vienna, and Zurich – the largest cities in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland – have significantly reduced the car share of trips over the past 25 years in spite of high motorisation rates. The key to their success has been a coordinated package of mutually reinforcing transport and land-use policies that have made car use s...
Article
This paper first provides a brief review of trends in public transport demand from 1980 to 2010 in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australia. The focus, however, is on a detailed analysis of public transport demand in Germany and the USA, using uniquely comparable national travel surveys from 2001/2002 and 2008/2009 for both countries. P...
Article
Full-text available
This article analyzes the variation in bike commuting in large American cities, with a focus on assessing the influence of bike paths and lanes, which have been the main approach to increasing cycling in the USA. To examine the role of cycling facilities, we used a newly assembled dataset on the length of bike lanes and paths in 2008 collected dire...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Travel surveys in Europe and the U.S. show large differences in the proportion of walking and cycling trips without considering implications for physical activity. Purpose: This study estimates differences between Germany and the U.S. over time in population levels of daily walking and cycling at different health-enhancing thresholds ac...
Article
Travel surveys in Europe and the U.S. show large differences in the proportion of walking and cycling trips without considering implications for physical activity. This study estimates differences between Germany and the U.S. over time in population levels of daily walking and cycling at different health-enhancing thresholds across sociodemographic...
Article
The results of a study undertaken to understand the impact of variations in active transportation on the obesity in Europe, North America, and Australia are presented. The approach used was to assemble data from various sources that included both raw data from national surveys of travel behavior and health indicators obtained from government agenci...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reviews trends in cycling levels, safety, and policies in Canada and the USA over the past two decades. We analyze aggregate data for the two countries as well as city-specific case study data for nine large cities (Chicago, Minneapolis, Montréal, New York, Portland, San Francisco, Toronto, Vancouver, and Washington). Cycling levels have...
Article
Full-text available
To assess changes in walking and cycling in the United States between 2001 and 2009. The 2001 and 2009 National Household Travel Surveys were used to compute the frequency, duration, and distance of walking and cycling per capita. The population-weighted person and trip files were merged to calculate the prevalence of any walking and cycling and of...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this paper is to document and explain differences in cycling between Australia’s two largest cities. Our comparative case study analysis is based on a wide range of statistical datasets, secondary reports, and interviews with a panel of 22 bicycling policy and planning experts. The main finding is that cycling levels in Melbourne are...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, Germany has improved the quality of its public transport services and attracted more passengers while increasing productivity, reducing costs, and cutting subsidies. Public transport systems reduced their costs through organizational restructuring and outsourcing to newly founded subsidiaries; cutting employee benefits an...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines changes in transport and land-use policies in Germany over the last 40 years that have encouraged more walking, bicycling and public trans-port use. It focuses on a case study of policy changes in the city of Freiburg, where over the last three decades, the number of bicycle trips tripled, public transport ridership doubled, a...
Article
Walking and cycling are the healthiest ways to get around our cities, providing valuable physical activity for people on a daily basis. These forms of active transport also generate indirect public health benefits by reducing the use of automobiles, thus diminishing air, water, and noise pollution and the overall level of traffic danger. This paper...
Article
Full-text available
Public Transport: A Personal Perspective. Transport for Suburbia: Beyond the Automobile Age by Paul Mees, 2010, Earthscan A New Window on Le Corbusier. The Rhetoric of Modernism: Le Corbusier as a Lecturer by Tim Benton, 2009, Birkhuser
Article
Full-text available
We sought to determine the magnitude, direction, and statistical significance of the relationship between active travel and rates of physical activity, obesity, and diabetes. We examined aggregate cross-sectional health and travel data for 14 countries, all 50 US states, and 47 of the 50 largest US cities through graphical, correlation, and bivaria...
Article
Full-text available
New York has made impressive progress at improving cycling conditions and raising cycling levels in recent years, especially in Brooklyn and Manhattan. The number of bike trips has almost doubled since 2000, thanks to vastly expanded cycling infrastructure, including innovative treatments such as cycle tracks, buffered bike lanes, special bike sign...
Article
Eine verbesserte finanzielle Nachhaltigkeit des ÖPNV erleichtert das Erreichen ökologischer und sozialer Nachhaltigkeitsziele, da Verkehre effizienter und kostengünstiger angeboten und ausgeweitet werden können. Dieser Artikel blickt aus den USA auf die beachtlichen Erfolge deutscher Nahverkehrsunternehmen, die in den letzten 20 Jahren ihre finanzi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides an overview of bike-transit integration in large American and Canadian cities. It begins with an analysis of national trends in bike-and-ride programs such as the provision of bike racks on buses, accommodation of bikes on rail vehicles, and bike parking at rail stations and bus stops. Most of the paper, however, is devoted to c...
Article
Full-text available
To assess existing research on the effects of various interventions on levels of bicycling. Interventions include infrastructure (e.g., bike lanes and parking), integration with public transport, education and marketing programs, bicycle access programs, and legal issues. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed and non-reviewed research identified...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates how bicycling can be promoted as a safe and feasible means of transport for everyone and for all trip purposes. The policies and programs needed to encourage a broad spectrum of social groups to cycle are the same policies and programs that encourage high overall levels of cycling: extensive systems of separate cycling facil...
Article
Full-text available
This study was designed to examine the relationship between active transportation (defined as the percentage of trips taken by walking, bicycling, and public transit) and obesity rates (BMI > or = 30 kg . m-2) in different countries. National surveys of travel behavior and health indicators in Europe, North America, and Australia were used in this...
Article
This article shows how the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany have made bicycling a safe, convenient and practical way to get around their cities. The analysis relies on national aggregate data as well as case studies of large and small cities in each country. The key to achieving high levels of cycling appears to be the provision of separate cycling...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents six detailed case studies of cycling in the Netherlands (Amsterdam and Groningen), Denmark (Copenhagen and Odense), and Germany (Berlin and Muenster). Except for Berlin, they represent the very best in coordinated policies and programs to make cycling safe, convenient, and attractive. Not only are cycling levels extraordinaril...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides a comparative overview of urban transport in the world's two most populous countries: China and India. Cities in both countries are suffering from severe and worsening transport problems: air pollution, noise, traffic injuries and fatalities, congestion, parking shortages, energy use, and a lack of mobility for the poor. The urb...
Article
Full-text available
This article summarizes comparative research on cycling in Canada and the US, conducted as part of the Canadian Studies Program of the Canadian Embassy in Washington. On average, Canadians make three times as many bike trips per capita as Americans, even controlling for differences in city size. The main reasons for this difference are Canada's hig...
Article
In spite of their colder climate, Canadians cycle about three times more than Americans. The main reasons for this difference are Canada's higher urban densities and mixed-use development, shorter trip distances, lower incomes, higher costs of owning, driving and parking a car, safer cycling conditions, and more extensive cycling infrastructure and...
Article
This article examines cycling trends over time, as well as diff erences in cy- cling levels, policies, and programs among diff erent Canadian provinces and metropolitan areas. Some policies and measures have been quite successful and innovative, providing valuable lessons for other countries about how best to increase cycling while improving its sa...
Article
On July 1, 2004, the Seoul Metropolitan Government introduced a wide range of reforms to its public transport system: it completely reorganized bus services, installed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) corridors, improved coordination of bus and metro services, and fully integrated the fare structure and ticketing system between routes as well as modes. This...
Article
Full-text available
Indian cities face a transport crisis characterized by levels of congestion, noise, pollution, traffic fatalities and injuries, and inequity far exceeding those in most European and North American cities. India's transport crisis has been exacerbated by the extremely rapid growth of India's largest cities in a context of low incomes, limited and ou...
Article
The advancements in the public transport facilities in Seoul, South Korea, are discussed. To coordinate bus service on a comprehensive, system-wide basis, the Seoul Metropolitan Government has set up a new bus management system (BMS) using advanced intelligent transport system (ITS) technology. A bus rapid transit network (BRT) is developed with de...
Article
Full-text available
This article uses data from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) to compare travel behavior in rural and urban areas of the U.S. As expected, the car is the overwhelmingly dominant mode of travel. Over 97% of rural households own at least one car vs. 92% of urban households; 91% of trips are made by car in rural areas vs. 86% in urban a...
Article
Full-text available
Bicycling accounted for an average of 1.2% of work trips in Canada in 2001, but with considerable variation by province and metropolitan area. In this study, we chose six Canadian cities for detailed analysis of their cycling trends and policies: Montreal and Quebec City in Quebec; Ottawa and Toronto in Ontario; and Vancouver and Victoria in Britis...
Article
Full-text available
Abstr Abstr Abstr Abstr Abstract act act act act The rapid growth of India's urban population has put enormous strains on all trans-port systems. Burgeoning travel demand far exceeds the limited supply of transport infrastructure and services. Public transport, in particular, has been completely over-whelmed. Most bus and train services are overcro...
Article
Full-text available
This article uses data from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey to compare travel behavior in rural and urban areas of the United States. As expected, the car is the overwhelmingly dominant mode of travel. Over 97% of rural households own at least one car vs. 92% of urban households; 91% of trips are made by car in rural areas vs. 86% in urba...
Article
Full-text available
The trends and challenges of urban public transport in India are discussed. The rapid growth in India's urban population has generated an enormous need for efficient public transport services to carry high volumes of passengers through dense, congested urban areas. The lack of effective planning and land use controls has resulted in rampant sprawle...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the public health consequences of unsafe and inconvenient walking and bicycling conditions in American cities to suggest improvements based on successful policies in The Netherlands and Germany. Secondary data from national travel and crash surveys were used to compute fatality trends from 1975 to 2001 and fatality and injury rates for...
Article
Full-text available
... In addition, they travel different distances and at different times of day. Many of these socioeconomic variations in travel behavior have important conse- quences for public policy. by John Pucher and John L. Renne Page 2. 50 TRANSPORTATION QUARTERLY / SUMMER ...
Article
After a decline in the recession years of the early 1990s, public transit use in the United States rose sharply from 1995 to 2000. Unlinked passenger trips increased by 21%, raising total ridership to the highest level in 40 years. The New York metropolitan area accounted for half of the entire nationwide growth. Transit use increased twice as fast...
Article
http://www.policy.rutgers.edu/faculty/pucher.htm publications in PDF format at http://www.policy.rutgers.edu/papers —————————————————————————————————————————————————— Abstract In the special issue on bicycling of WTPP (Volume 7, Number 3), Heath Maddox questions the potential of public policies to encourage bicycling. This response to the Maddox cr...