John C Montgomery

John C Montgomery
University of Auckland · Institute of Marine Science

PhD University of Bristol

About

224
Publications
30,266
Reads
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Introduction
John C Montgomery currently works at the Institute of Marine Science, University of Auckland. John does research in Marine Biology and Neuroscience. Current projects include: 'Overcoming dispersal and recruitment constraints on native freshwater biodiversity' 'Hearing in sharks'
Additional affiliations
May 1978 - present
University of Auckland
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (224)
Article
The cumulative effect of culverts in impeding upstream fish passage is similar to that of large-scale high-head instream structures. The common solution to overcome this impediment is to add ancillary elements, with the goal to lower water velocities and to create discrete low velocity zones (LVZs) for fish to rest. The addition of spoiler baffles...
Article
Here, we review fish rheotaxis (orientation to flow) with the goal of placing it within a larger behavioral and multisensory context. Rheotaxis is a flexible behavior that is used by fish in a variety of circumstances: to search for upstream sources of current-borne odors, to intercept invertebrate drift and, in general, to conserve energy while pr...
Article
Increasing interest in fish passage solutions past low-head instream structures has led to the development and implementation of new designs with various types of roughness elements within these structures. We know that roughness elements increase the heterogeneity in water velocity by creating a continuous or discrete low velocity zone, which supp...
Article
Full-text available
The demand for information on mid-trophic level (MTL) organisms in open-ocean marine ecosystems has led to initiatives to collect acoustic data opportunistically in different regions around the world. Although, bulk acoustic data can provide information on the distribution patterns and dynamics of MTL organisms, it is necessary to convert acoustic-...
Chapter
Synopsis All fish have a lateral line system; an array of sensors found across the surface of the head and along the body. They provide a rich source of information on the interaction of the body surface and surrounding water. Information that allows fish to: orient to water flows; take advantage of flow refuges; swim more efficiently; and detect t...
Article
Full-text available
Both the lateral line and the inner ear contribute to near-field dipole source detection in fish. The precise roles these two sensory modalities provide in extracting information about the flow field remain of interest. In this study, evoked potentials (EP, 30–200 Hz) for blind Mexican cavefish were measured in response to a dipole source. Greatest...
Article
The modification and utilization of rivers in regions where small-bodied diadromous fish are prevalent has largely occurred without fully understanding the migration behaviour of these species. As a result, existing in-stream structures often prevent or restrict migration. Current fish passage design guidance generally focuses on providing average...
Article
The elaborate structure of the cerebellum has been long known, although its contribution to a remarkable diversity of behavior is only recently appreciated. Taking an evolutionary perspective, we consider the wider function of the cerebellum based on insight from the function of so-called cerebellum-like structures. Cerebellum-like structures cance...
Article
All fish can detect the three vector components of particle motion, enabling them to determine source bearing, but particle motion alone cannot resolve which direction is towards the source and which direction is away (i.e., there is a 180° ambiguity). However, fish with swim bladders can also detect acoustic pressure which enables such fish to res...
Article
Mid-trophic level organisms (MTLO) of open-ocean marine ecosystems play a key role linking primary and tertiary consumers. Despite their importance, characterisation of MTLO is limited due to sampling difficulty, and is largely obtained through active acoustics. Acoustic data collected from vessels of opportunity transiting across the Southern Ocea...
Article
Data on the distribution and abundance of mid-trophic level organisms (MTLOs) in the pelagic open-ocean ecosystem are normally sparse or absent. Consequently, ecosystem models are limited in their ability to support decision-making for issues ranging from fisheries management to ecosystem resilience to climate change. We used acoustic data collecte...
Article
Full-text available
The utility of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a means of protecting exploited species and conserving biodiversity within MPA boundaries is supported by strong empirical evidence. However, the potential contribution of MPAs to fished populations beyond their boundaries is still highly controversial; empirical measures are scarce and modelling stud...
Article
The marine environment is the planet’s largest, yet in many respects the least accessible. Our human sensory repertoire, with its emphasis on vision and air-adapted hearing, does not serve us well underwater. Underwater vision is often limited and as divers we find hearing of little, or no, use. Yet we know from the physics that underwater sound ha...
Article
Full-text available
Here, we introduce a novel mechanism for temporal recoding by the cerebellar granular layer based on three key properties: the granule cell-Golgi cell inhibitory feedback loop, bursting behaviour of granule cells and the large ratio of granule cells to Golgi cells. We propose that mutual inhibition of granule cells, mediated by Golgi cell feedback...
Article
Full-text available
In the adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, the granular layer performs a recoding which expands incoming mossy fibre signals into a temporally diverse set of basis signals. The underlying neural mechanism is not well understood, although various mechanisms have been proposed, including delay lines, spectral timing and echo state networks. Here...
Book
The cerebellum is an intriguing component of the brain. In humans, it occupies only 10% of the brain volume, yet has approximately 69 billion neurons, i.e. 80% of the nerve cells in the brain! A functional understanding of the cerebellum is enabled by the fact it is made up of a repeated array of neuronal networks, or motifs, each of which may func...
Article
Full-text available
Fish vocalisation is often a major component of underwater soundscapes. Therefore, interpretation of these soundscapes requires an understanding of the vocalisation characteristics of common soniferous fish species. This study of captive female bluefin gurnard, Chelidonichthys kumu, aims to formally characterise their vocalisation sounds and daily...
Article
Full-text available
Soundscapes provide a new tool for the study of fish communities. Bigeyes (Pempheris adspersa) are nocturnal planktivorous reef fish, feed in loose shoals and are soniferous. These vocalisations have been suggested to be contact calls to maintain group cohesion, however direct evidence for this is absent, despite the fact that contact calls are wel...
Article
The top predators in coastal marine ecosystems, such as whales, dolphins, seabirds, and large predatory fishes (including sharks), may compete with each other to exploit food aggregations. Finding these patchy food sources and being first to a food patch could provide a significant competitive advantage. Our hypothesis is that food patches have spe...
Article
Full-text available
Fish sounds are an important biological component of the underwater soundscape. Understanding species-specific sounds and their associated behaviour is critical to determine how animals use the biological component of the soundscape. Using both field and laboratory experiments we describe the sound production of a nocturnal planktivore, Pempheris a...
Article
Full-text available
A high-resolution 3D biophysical model was used to investigate the patterns of larval transport for an important commercial and recreational temperate fish, snapper Pagrus auratus, from a well-established marine reserve (Cape Rodney to Okakari Point marine reserve, CROP), and spawning ground. Our focus was to study the effects of local hydrodynamic...
Article
Detailed swimming kinematics of the yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi were investigated after unilateral ablation of superficial neuromasts (SNs). Most kinematic variables, such as tail-beat frequency, stride length, caudal fin-beat amplitude and propulsive wavelength, were unaffected but lateral amplitude at the tip of the snout (A0 ) was signif...
Conference Paper
We draw inspiration from the fish “hearing” organ, the otolith, to create a portable engineering device that can augment a human diver’s ability to hear underwater. The otolith is an inertial displacement sensor, consisting of a dense bony mass that acts as a reference to the surrounding sensory hair cells. The challenges in adapting the otolith in...
Chapter
This chapter summarizes what is known about the role of lateral line flow sensors in different types of fish orienting behaviors and the spatiotemporal characteristics of flow patterns that guide fish. Where possible, fundamental and shared principles of flow guidance are identified for behaviors as diverse as rheotaxis, prey orientation, and preda...
Article
Sharks detect their prey using an extremely sensitive electrosensory system that is capable of distinguishing weak external stimuli from a relatively strong background noise generated by the animal itself. Experiments indicate that part of the shark’s hindbrain, the dorsal octavolateralis nucleus (DON), is responsible for extracting the external st...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic data can provide quantitative and qualitative information about the distribution and abundance of mid-trophic level functional groups in the marine ecosystem. Acoustic data, opportunistically collected on 2 return voyages between New Zealand and Chile, were used to describe the distribution patterns of pelagic fishes across the South Pacif...
Article
The purpose of this paper is to highlight the contributions of the Leigh Marine Laboratory to sensory neuroethology. A brief summary of the work done at Leigh, or by Leigh staff, is given across each of the main sensory modalities: chemosense, vision and octavolateralis sensory systems (electrosense, flow sensing and hearing). Within this broad ove...
Chapter
The sensory ecology and neuroethology of the lateral line provides an overview of the role of the lateral line in natural fish behaviour. The approach is more conceptual than comprehensive, choosing representative behaviors and especially those that lend themselves to a neuroethological analysis. This approach provides a clear focus for the determi...
Article
Full-text available
The New Zealand bigeye, Pempheris adspersa, is a nocturnal planktivore and has recently been found to be an active sound producer. The rostral end of the swim bladder lies adjacent to Baudelot's ligament which spans between the bulla and the cleithrum bone of the pectoral girdle. The aim of this study was to use the auditory evoked potential techni...
Article
Full-text available
Swim bladder extensions and hearing ability were examined in the temperate reef fish Polyprion oxygeneios (hapuka). Using the auditory evoked potential (AEP) technique, hearing thresholds were determined in four age-classes of hapuka, from larvae to juveniles. The youngest age-class had poor hearing abilities, with lowest thresholds of 132 dB re 1...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of evidence suggests that larval fish use sound as an orientation cue to remotely locate suitable settlement habitats. Several theoretical models have used hearing thresholds to estimate the distance at which fish larvae can detect reefs. However, researchers have often measured hearing thresholds from fish raised in aquaculture envi...
Article
Full-text available
The cerebellum is well developed in cartilaginous fishes, with the same cell types (barring basket cells) and organizational features found in other vertebrate groups, including mammals. In particular, the lattice-like organization of cerebellar cortex (with a molecular layer of parallel fibers, interneurons, spiny Purkinje cell dendrites, and clim...
Article
Full-text available
The yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi, shows a distribution of anaerobic and aerobic (red and pink) muscle fibres along the trunk that is characteristic of active pelagic fishes. The athletic capacity of S. lalandi is also shown by its relative high standard metabolic rate and optimal (i.e. least cost) swimming speed. To test the hypothesis that...
Article
Full-text available
Le Port, A., Lavery, S., and Montgomery, J. C. 2012. Conservation of coastal stingrays: seasonal abundance and population structure of the short-tailed stingray Dasyatis brevicaudata at a Marine Protected Area. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 69: . Elasmobranch (shark, ray, and skate) populations around the world are in decline, and effective con...
Article
Full-text available
The auditory evoked potential technique has been used for the past 30 years to evaluate the hearing ability of fish. The resulting audiograms are typically presented in terms of sound pressure (dB re. 1 μPa) with the particle motion (dB re. 1 m s(-2)) component largely ignored until recently. When audiograms have been presented in terms of particle...
Article
Aggregations of organisms, ranging from zooplankton to whales, are an extremely common phenomenon in the pelagic zone; perhaps the best known are fish schools. Social aggregation is a special category that refers to groups that self-organize and maintain cohesion to exploit benefits such as protection from predators, and location and capture of res...
Article
Full-text available
Underwater sound emanating from reefs has been shown to be attractive to pre-settlement larval stages of fish and crustaceans, but its ecological importance depends on the range at which this cue can be detected by these larvae. Here we show, through field measurement and modelling, that the spatially extended sound source of a reef creates a surro...
Article
This book addresses emerging challenges for the World Ocean in the Anthropocene epoch and the effects of increasing globalisation on the seas. The issues explored in particular include climate change, sustainable fisheries, biodiversity, shipping and regional seas adjoining Europe.
Article
This study investigated the movement patterns of yellow moray eels Gymnothorax prasinus using acoustic telemetry. Gymnothorax prasinus were found to use multiple sites within a localized area or home range.
Article
The nocturnal southern bastard cod Pseudophycis barbata was found to utilize chemo- and mechanosensory systems when hunting for prey under low light conditions. The sensory system used depended on whether prey produced a hydrodynamic signal.
Data
Striped marlin trajectories by season 2005–2008 after CTCRW regularization. (TIF)
Data
Estimates of t-distribution parameters from non-linear minimization for uKFSST longitude and latitude errors. (XLS)
Data
Joint probability densities of errors for CTCRW regularized uKFSST geolocations from transmitted PSAT data. (TIF)
Data
Effects of CTCRW regularization on double-tagged striped marlin STM06.14. The black line and points are raw location data, with triangles representing uKFSST location estimates and circles representing Argos locations from the SLRT tag. Red represents the smoothed CTCRW pathway. (TIF)
Data
Controlling for striped marlin capture effects. Red vector (red inset box): Travel distance and direction over 8 day PSAT deployment from speargun. Black vectors: Travel distance and direction over initial 8 days at liberty for six individuals captured with standard recreational fishing methods. (TIFF)
Data
Multiplier function K values used as error model parameters used in CTCRW regularization. (XLS)
Data
Density function parameters estimated by maximum likelihood for each individual. (XLS)
Data
Comparison of free-tagged to recreationally captured and tagged striped marlin movements. (DOC)
Data
Temporal regularization and behavioural classification of striped marlin trajectories. (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
Behaviour and distribution of striped marlin within the southwest Pacific Ocean were investigated using electronic tagging data collected from 2005-2008. A continuous-time correlated random-walk Kalman filter was used to integrate double-tagging data exhibiting variable error structures into movement trajectories composed of regular time-steps. Thi...
Chapter
Hearing in its broadest sense is the detection, by specialized mechanoreceptors, of mechanical energy propagated through the environment. In terrestrial vertebrates, this typically means inner ear transduction of air pressure waves radiating out from a sound source, though the detection of substrate vibrations can also be considered as a form of he...
Article
Full-text available
Blind Mexican cave fish (Astyanax fasciatus) sense the presence of nearby objects by sensing changes in the water flow around their body. The information available to the fish using this hydrodynamic imaging ability depends on the properties of the flow field it generates while gliding and how this flow field is altered by the presence of objects....
Article
Blind Mexican cave fish (Astyanax fasciatus) are able to sense detailed information about objects by gliding alongside them and sensing changes in the flow field around their body using their lateral line sensory system. Hence the fish are able to build hydrodynamic images of their surroundings. This study measured the flow fields around blind cave...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanoreceptive lateral line system in fishes detects hydrodynamic stimuli and plays a critical role in many fundamental behaviours, including orientation to water currents and the detection of stationary objects, prey and predators. Interspecific variation in lateral line structure may result from a process of functional adaptation, with the...