John Measey

John Measey
Stellenbosch University | SUN · CIB DSI-NRF Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology

PhD

About

427
Publications
125,432
Reads
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6,104
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2012 - March 2014
Nelson Mandela University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
May 2011 - June 2012
North-West University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2006 - April 2011
South African National Biodiversity Institute
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (427)
Article
Full-text available
The exponential increase in species introductions during the Anthropocene has brought about a major loss of biodiversity. Amphibians have suffered large declines, with more than 16% considered to be threatened by invasive species. We conducted a global meta-analysis of the impacts of alien species on native amphibians to determine which aspects of...
Article
Full-text available
The desire to own a pet amphibian is growing, and with it a growth in amphibian trade and in negative impacts on native populations, including disease transmission and invasive amphibian populations. We know very little about how or why people choose amphibians as pets, but amphibian owners share large numbers of videos on freely accessible platfor...
Article
Full-text available
The burgeoning global pet trade in vertebrates, including amphibians, has conservation implications for overexploitation of native populations, spread of diseases, and invasions. The majority of amphibian invasions are due to the pet trade pathway and current lists of extra-limital amphibians suggest that future invasions will encompass a broader t...
Chapter
Full-text available
This review provides the first assessment of animal species that are native to South Africa and invasive elsewhere in the world. While around a twelfth of all naturalised plants in the world are native to South Africa, there are very few examples of South African native marine, terrestrial, or freshwater animals becoming invasive elsewhere. We prov...
Article
Full-text available
The environmental and socioeconomic impacts of invasive species have long been recognised to be unequal , with some species being benign while others are disastrous. Until recently there was no recognised standard impact scoring framework with which to compare impacts of species from very different taxa. The advent of the Environmental Impact Class...
Preprint
Allotetraploid genomes have two distinct genomic compartments called subgenomes that are derived from separate diploid ancestral species. Many genomic characteristics such as gene function, expression, recombination, and transposable element mobility may differ significantly between subgenomes. To explore the possibility that subgenome population s...
Chapter
What is a scientific journal for? In addition to communicating science among peers, journals record primacy, afford legitimacy and archive their content for the future. Understanding the principles of the need for scientific journals is integral to preparing work for submission to them.
Chapter
Chapter 31 - Are you bullying or being bullied? A surprisingly high number of academics experience bullying in their positions, but many bullies are not aware of their impact. How to spot a bully and what to do about bullying are therefore salient lessons for you and your group.
Chapter
Chapter 29 - Are researchers writing more, and is more better? More academics are producing more content than ever before. Are academics watering down their research into least publishable units, and is this growth sustainable?
Chapter
Chapter 27 - What are predatory journals? A predatory journal is surprisingly difficult to define. Yet the predators appear to be on the rise. How can you spot them and what can you do to avoid falling prey to predatory conferences and journals?
Book
This book is OA and you can access it freely online at: http://www.howtopublishscience.org/ Part I - Getting your manuscript ready for submission Although you may have already done your research, and written your manuscript, getting it ready for publication will require a new set of hurdles for you to jump over. In this section, I discuss what yo...
Chapter
Chapter 14 - Open Access or a paywall for your manuscript? The Open Access (OA) model is very attractive, but there are many different OA models to choose from. You have more options than you think, in order to keep your manuscript OA and avoid article processing charges.
Chapter
Chapter 24 - Is Open Access good? While OA appears to tick all of the transparency boxes, there is a lot more happening under the surface. Using the story of the rocketing global journal PLOS ONE, we explore the history of OA, where it’s going and why it might not be all gold.
Chapter
Chapter 33 - Habilitation, DSc and Tenure. Different academic systems require that you may need another qualification before you can run your own research group. Be sure that you find out in case you are thinking of working in another system.
Article
Full-text available
Estimating and planning for the impacts of climate change on the biodiversity of protected areas is a major challenge for conservation managers. When these areas are topographically heterogenous and contain species' entire ranges, this challenge is exacerbated because the coarse spatial scales of Global Circulation Model projections provide limited...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative studies of mortality in the wild are necessary to understand the evolution of aging; yet, ectothermic tetrapods are underrepresented in this comparative landscape, despite their suitability for testing evolutionary hypotheses. We present a study of aging rates and longevity across wild tetrapod ectotherms, using data from 107 population...
Article
Caecilians are predominantly burrowing, elongate, limbless amphibians that remain relatively poorly studied. Although it has been suggested that the sturdy and compact skulls of caecilians are an adaptation to their head-first burrowing habits, no clear relationship between skull shape and burrowing performance appears to exist. However, the extern...
Article
Caecilians are elongate, limbless and annulated amphibians that, as far as is known, all have an at least partly fossorial lifestyle. It has been suggested that elongate limbless vertebrates show little morphological differentiation throughout the postcranial skeleton. However, relatively few studies have explored the axial skeleton in limbless tet...
Preprint
Cryptic amphibians pose a problem for conservation managers as they are difficult to find to assess initial populations, and monitor changes during potentially threatening processes. The rough moss frog, Arthroleptella rugosa , is small and occurs in seepages on a single unprotected mountain in South Africa's fire prone, biodiverse fynbos biome. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Angola has experienced an incredible increase of the knowledge of its herpetofauna over the past decade. However, accurate biodiversity inventories remain deficient for certain regions of particular conservation interest. We therefore provide an updated checklist of Iona National Park’s herpetofauna, with 75 recorded species, including five amphibi...
Article
Full-text available
Animals are increasingly challenged to respond to novel or rapidly changing habitats due to urbanization and/or displacement outside their native range by humans. Behavioral differences, such as increased boldness (i.e., propensity for risk-taking), are often observed in animals persisting in novel environments; however, in many cases, it is unclea...
Article
Full-text available
Management strategies for invasive populations should be designed to maximise efficacy and efficiency, i.e. to accomplish their goals while operating with the least resource consumption. This optimisation is often difficult to achieve in stage-structured populations, because costs, benefits and feasibility of removing individuals may vary with stag...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien species (IAS) are a growing threat globally and cause a variety of ecological, economic, and social impacts. People can introduce IAS and facilitate their spread, and can also implement, support, or oppose their management. Understanding local knowledge, awareness, and perceptions are therefore crucial if management and policy are to...
Article
Caecilians are enigmatic limbless amphibians that, with a few exceptions all have an at least partly burrowing lifestyle. Although it has been suggested that caecilian evolution resulted in sturdy and compact skulls as an adaptation to their head-first burrowing habits, no relationship between skull shape and burrowing performance has been demonstr...
Article
Full-text available
Background Many animals display morphological and behavioural adaptations to the habitats in which they live and the resources they exploit. Bite force is an important whole-organism performance trait that allows an increase in dietary breadth, the inclusion of novel prey in the diet, territory and predatory defence, and is important during mating...
Article
Full-text available
Detecting occupied sites of rare species, and estimating the probability that all occupied sites are known within a given area, are desired outcomes for many ecological or conservation projects. Examples include managing all occupied sites of a threatened species, or eradicating an emerging invader. Occupied sites may remain undetected because 1) s...
Chapter

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Developing methods of individually based passive acoustic monitoring for threatened coastal dolphins. Our research group has made important steps toward developing this method, which we call SWORD - Signature Whistles for Occurrence, Recapture and Density including publishing on the detection and production of signature whistles in wild dolphins populations (Gridley  etal., 2014, Fearey et al., 2019, Kriesell et al., 2014). We recently published our first paper (Longden et al., 2020, J. Mammalogy) using signature whistles in a Capture-Recapture framework to generate an abundance estimates of the Namibian bottlenose dolphin population. This method has incredible promise for studying small or endangered populations of dolphins or those in inaccessible habitats such as along many areas of the African coast where regular boat surveys are challenging.  We are extending this project over a larger spatial range to develop the statistical methods research from capture-recapture (MR)for abundance estimation to spatial capture-recapture (SCR) for density estimation(a more useful metric for populations)
Archived project
To determine the impacts of past and future climate change on a suite of African amphibians. To do this, we use a suite of different methods, including correlative SDMs, physiology and performance to determine how each of these factors contribute to species specific responses, particularly to future climate change