John Local

John Local
The University of York · Department of Language and Linguistic Science

CERT ED., BA, PhD

About

59
Publications
8,908
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,141
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
507 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Introduction
I'm currently working with Dr Marianna Kaimaki on the interactional function and design of questions asked in overlap. We're using the LDC CallHome English corpus of telephone calls.
Additional affiliations
October 1976 - present
The University of York
Position
  • Emeritus Professor of Phonetics and Linguistics

Publications

Publications (59)
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The analysis of language use in real-world contexts poses particular methodological challenges. We codify responses to these challenges as a series of methodological imperatives. To demonstrate the relevance of these imperatives to clinical investigation, we present analyses of single episodes of interaction where one participant has a spe...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations into the management of turn-taking have typically focussed on pitch and other prosodic phenomena, particularly pitch-accents. Here, non-pitch phonetic features and their role in turn-taking are described. Through sustained phonetic and interactional analysis of a naturally occurring, 12-minute long telephone call between two adult sp...
Chapter
Full-text available
Not infrequently in conversation, a speaker launches an activity which in some way or other is intercepted by another co-participant, or is otherwise unsuccessful, such that it receives no proper uptake. Activities of this kind may simply be lost. However, speakers who did not succeed may also 'try again'. In this paper, we describe three ways of '...
Article
Full-text available
Sue Peppé's article (2009) surveys key issues relevant to the clinical assessment and management of prosodic aspects of spoken communication. In the first part of this commentary, we demonstrate one approach to assessment, which involves close analysis of the use of prosody in spontaneous talk-in-interaction. This approach derives from one pioneere...
Article
Full-text available
Jones-SargentVal: Tyne Bytes: A Computerized Sociolinguistic Study of Tyneside. (Pp. ix + 294. 4 Appendices. Peter Lang: Frankfurt, 1983.) - Volume 14 Issue 1 - John Local
Article
EdwardsJane A. & LampertMartin D. (eds.), Talking data: Transcription and coding in discourse research. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1993. Pp. vii, 325. Hb $59.95. - Volume 24 Issue 2 - John K. Local
Chapter
In attempting to describe the patterns of simplification in informal speech, we are, in a sense, trying to do a ridiculous thing. (Brown, 1990, p. 58) 36.1 Introduction Many people with speech difficulties are unintelligible when using longer strings of speech in everyday, spontaneous communication, even though they may be able to produce single wo...
Article
Full-text available
Les études de la prosodie dans les interactions conversationnelles ont mis en évidence la façon complexe et subtile dont font preuve les locuteurs dans l'utilisation des traits prosodiques pour négocier lors des interactions quotidiennes. Dans les analyses développementales et cliniques, la question est de savoir comment les enfants apprennent à gé...
Article
Linguists, and other analysts of discourse, regularly make appeal to affectual states in determining the meaning of utterances. We examine two kinds of sequence that occur in everyday conversation. The first involves one participant making an explicit lexical formulation of a co-participant's affectual state (e.g., ‘you sound happy’, ‘don't sound s...
Article
In this paper we present a production study designed to explore the relationship between three observations which have previously been made about liquids in British English: first, that laterals have prosodically-determined ‘clear’ (syllable-initial) and ‘dark’ (syllable-final) variants; second, that some varieties of English have either clear [1]...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines some methodological and em-pirical issues concerning phonetic detail and pho-netic variability and the work they accomplish in ev-eryday talk-in-interaction. By considering the pho-netic and sequential design of a variety of conversa-tional practices I show that phonetic aspects of lan-guage should in the first instance be under...
Article
Full-text available
Repetition poses certain problems for pragmatics, as evidenced by Sperber and Wilson's claim that “the effects of repetition on utterance interpretation are by no means constant”. This is particularly apposite when we examine repetitions produced in naturally occurring talk. As part of an ongoing study of how phonetics relates to the dynamic evolut...
Article
Full-text available
Techniques of sequential and phonetic analysis are brought to bear on two se- quences of everyday conversation which extend understanding of a previously de- scribed practice (the ‘abrupt-join’). The findings also provide directions for future analysis.
Article
Full-text available
We describe and exemplify a methodology for providing an integrated account of the communicative function of parametric phonetic detail and its relationship with interactional organization. We exemplify our analytic approach by documenting two different phonetic designs of stand-alone 'so' in a corpus of recorded American English telephone conversa...
Article
Full-text available
This paper represents part of the output of an ongoing study of clusters of phonetic parameters in the management of talk-in-interaction. Here we report on the sequential organisation and phonetic form of abrupt-joins. By abrupt-join we mean to adumbrate a complex of recurrent phonetic events which attend a point of possible turn-completion, and th...
Chapter
Participants in talk-in-interaction understand what is happening by reference to preceding turns at talk. However, some utterances are not closely linked to the turn that immediately precedes them. Here I explore one device that participants may use to display that subsequent talk is not to be treated as cohering with the immediately prior talk, bu...
Article
Conventional treatments of vowel harmony processes routinely make two important assumptions: first, only vowels are implicated in the harmonic process and second, the phonologically relevant harmony features have a transparent (intrinsic) phonetic interpretation (IPI). Consonants are typically treated only insofar as they interfere with such harmon...
Article
Spoken language is a resource which is systematically deployed in the management of social interaction, its primary site of occurrence. The patterns and structures in language are emergent properties of, and shaped by, the contingencies and demands of social interaction. However, despite significant advances in modeling speech perception and unders...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The natural home of spoken language is social interaction and linguistic (phonetic) resources are systematically deployed in its management. However, despite the advent of large databases of 'spontaneous speech' and an increasing acknowledgement of the relevance of phonetic detail for speech perception and understanding, the organisation of the pho...
Article
Full-text available
Durational serial interactions are not generally incorporated into contemporary predictive models of timing for speech synthesis. In this study, an anti-correlational factor applied at the syllable level was identified for syllable lags occurring within roughly 500 ms. As applied to synthetic speech, a strongly anticorrelational effect appears to l...
Conference Paper
This paper outlines ProSynth, an approach to speech synthesis which takes a rich linguistic structure as central to the generation of natural-sounding speech. We start from the assumption that the speech signal is informationally rich, and that this acoustic richness reflects linguistic structural richness and underlies the percept of naturalness....
Chapter
Usually the problem of timing in speech synthesis is construed as the search for appropriate algorithms for altering durations of speech units under various conditions (e.g., stressed versus unstressed syllables, final versus non-final position, nature of surrounding segments). This chapter proposes a model of phonological representation and phonet...
Article
LaverJohn, Principles of phonetics. (Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Pp. xxviii+502 appendices. - Volume 32 Issue 2 - John Local
Chapter
AIMS AND SCOPE The establishment of this series reflects the growth of both interest and research into disorders of speech and language. It is intended that the series will provide a platform for the development of academic debate and enquiry into the related fields of speech pathology and clinical linguistics. To this end, the series will publish...
Article
A case study is presented of an autistic boy aged 11 years. The analysis is based on audio-visual recordings made in both his home and school. The focus of the study is on that subset of immediate echolalia that has been referred to as pure echoing. Using an approach informed by conversation analysis and descriptive phonetics, distinctions are draw...
Article
Full-text available
c1 Department of Language & Linguistic Science, University of York, Heslington, York YO1 5DD, UK. E-mail: rao1@unix.york.ac.uk (Ogden) jl1@unix.york.ac.uk (Local)
Article
Studies of normal and atypical prosodic development show that some children learning English invariably locate the main prosodic prominence at the end of the utterance, even though the main focus of information may come earlier. A case study is presented of David, a speech- and language-impaired child from the West Midlands of England who displayed...
Article
A study of the phonetics of everyday conversational interaction looked specifically at the occurrence of the "oh" particle, a signal of the receipt of new information. Focus was on the phonetic characteristics of the "oh" utterance in this context. Data were drawn from British and American recorded telephone conversations. It was observed that when...
Article
In this paper, we examine a disquieting problem concerning the "constraining power" of the "No Crossing Constraint" with respect to multiplanar Autosegmental Phonological Representations. We argue that the "No Crossing Constraint" is not a constraint at all, since it does not reduce or restrict the class of well-formed Autosegmental Phonological Re...
Article
Remarkably little is known in detail about the phonetics and phonology of naturally occurring conversational talk. Virtually nothing of interest is known of the interactional implications of particular kinds of phonetic events in everyday talk: in particular about the ways in which participants in talk deploy general phonetic resources to accomplis...
Article
the larynx and the rib cage. These sets of movements coordinated one with an- other set in motion and work upon an air-stream. The coordination takes place in time so as to produce complex recurrent patterns of movement, the whole thing being 'driven' neurophysiologically. Utterances have a relation to linguistic elements defined at a higher level...
Article
A study examined final vowel qualities in the speech of seven English speakers from the urban Tyneside area of England. It focused on variations in the pronunciation of the final "y" (e.g., city, happy, tiny) and their explanation by way of (1) the resonance characteristics associated with the articulatory gesture, (2) the rhythmic-quantity charact...
Article
We examine the auditory resonance characteristics associated with selected r- and l-sounds in various accents of English. Our findings derive primarily from close phonetic observation of five speakers of non-standard accents. These speakers were asked to produce some 200 utterances all containing r- and l-sounds in various phonological contexts. Th...
Article
Participants in conversation have at their disposal many ways of showing that their speaking-turn is complete. An important resource for achieving this interactive task is provided by phonetic features. However, the precise role of these features has been obscured because analysts have relied too heavily on their intuitions, particularly about into...
Article
A. J. Ellis's encyclopaedic work On Early English Pronunciation (henceforth EEP) now receives remarkably little serious attention from linguists. This has not always been the case. As long ago as 1877 Sweet hailed EEP as a ‘great work’ which ‘inaugurated the scientific historical study of English pronunciation.’ (viii) Other commentators admittedly...
Article
A recurrent feature of multi-party conversation is that one speaker comes in prior to the completion of another's turn and can be heard as directly competing with the other for possession of the turn. That is, the incomer can be heard as wanting the floor to himself not when the current speaker has finished but now, at this point in the conversatio...
Article
Full-text available
Nouveaux cahier s de ling uistiq ue fran çaise 2 8 (20 0 7), 67 -8 6. Abstract This paper explores some methodological and empirical issues concerning phonetic detail and phonetic variability and the work they accomplish in talk-in-interaction. I argue that if we wish to explicate how phonetic design contributes to the meaning of utterances we need...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Documenting the interactional and phonetic characteristics of questions asked in overlap with another speaker which are treated as either non-problematic or problematic (e.g. responded to with open class NTRIs)