John D. Lloyd

John D. Lloyd
American Wind Wildlife Institute | AWWI

PhD

About

74
Publications
21,083
Reads
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1,312
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2019 - present
American Wind Wildlife Institute
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • I help catalyze and translate science that informs wildlife conservation and the responsible development of renewable energy.
October 2014 - March 2019
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • I led a team of conservation biologists working to conserve wildlife across the Americas through research, monitoring, and citizen engagement.
January 2013 - present
Natural Areas Journal
Position
  • Associate Editor
Education
August 1998 - May 2003
University of Montana
Field of study
  • Wildlife Biology
September 1995 - May 1997
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Wildlife Ecology
August 1991 - May 1995
University of Vermont
Field of study
  • Wildlife Biology

Publications

Publications (74)
Article
Full-text available
How to shape the anticipated build‐out of industrial‐scale renewable energy in a way that minimizes risk to wildlife remains contentious. The challenge of balancing wildlife conservation and decarbonization of the electricity sector is well illustrated in the grasslands and shrub‐steppe of North America. Here, several endemic species of grouse are...
Preprint
A literature review of empirical research on the interactions between wind-energy development and grouse (Aves:Tetraoninae) of the North American plains and shrub-steppe.
Article
Full-text available
We investigated mercury (Hg) blood concentrations in Bicknell’s thrush (Catharus bicknelli) and Swainson’s thrush (C. ustulatus), congeneric long-distance migratory songbirds, from 2000−2017 at a montane forest site in north-central Vermont. We analyzed variation in blood Hg of both species using mixed-effects models, incorporating atmospheric wet...
Article
Full-text available
2019. Apparent survival of a range-restricted montane forest bird species is influenced by weather throughout the annual cycle. Avian Conservation and Ecology 14(2):16. https://doi. ABSTRACT. To conserve small and fragmented populations, we need an understanding of their population dynamics. With a global population estimate of < 120,000, Bicknell'...
Article
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg) has accumulated in forested landscapes in the Northeastern U.S., and hotspots with enhanced deposition have been identified throughout the region. Due to a variety of favorable landscape characteristics, including relatively high dissolved organic carbon (DOC), fluctuating water levels, and low pH and dissolved oxygen, vernal pools pro...
Article
Full-text available
We compared occupancy in local assemblages of birds in forested areas across Puerto Rico during a winter before (2015) and shortly after (2018) the passage of hurricanes Irma and Maria. Using dynamic community models analyzed within a Bayesian framework, we found significant changes in detectability, with some species becoming more readily detected...
Preprint
Full-text available
We compared occupancy in local assemblages of birds in forested areas across Puerto Rico during a winter before (2015) and shortly after (2018) the passage of hurricanes Irma and Maria. Using dynamic community models analyzed within a Bayesian framework, we found significant changes in detectability, with some species becoming more readily detected...
Preprint
Full-text available
We used Landsat-based estimates of tree cover change to document the loss and gain of forest in the Dominican Republic between 2000 and 2016. Overall, 2,795 km2 of forest were lost, with forest gain occurring on only 393 km2, yielding a net loss of 2,402 km2 of forest, a decline of 11.1% or 0.7% per year. Deforestation occurred in all of the major...
Article
Full-text available
The breeding range of the Eastern Fox Sparrow ( Passerella iliaca iliaca ) is generally recognized as comprising the boreal forest of Canada. However, recent observations suggest that the species is present during the summer months throughout much of the northeastern US, unexpected for a species characterized as a passage migrant in the region. To...
Preprint
Full-text available
The breeding range of the Red Fox Sparrow ( Passerella iliaca iliaca ) is generally recognized as comprising the boreal forest of Canada. However, recent observations suggest that the species is present during the summer months throughout much of the northeastern U.S., unexpected for a species characterized as a passage migrant in the region. To cl...
Preprint
The breeding range of the Red Fox Sparrow ( Passerella iliaca iliaca ) is generally recognized as comprising the boreal forest of Canada. However, recent observations suggest that the species is present during the summer months throughout much of the northeastern U.S., unexpected for a species characterized as a passage migrant in the region. To cl...
Article
The winter range of the Bicknell's Thrush (Catharus bicknelli), a globally vulnerable Nearctic-Neotropical migratory songbird, is restricted to the Greater Antilles. Most birds occur on Hispaniola, where the species exhibits sexual habitat segregation, and where the loss of its preferred wet broadleaf habitats has been severe. Conservation of femal...
Article
Full-text available
Motivation: The BioTIME database contains raw data on species identities and abundances in ecological assemblages through time. These data enable users to calculate temporal trends in biodiversity within and amongst assemblages using a broad range of metrics. BioTIME is being developed as a community-led open-source database of biodiversity time se...
Article
Full-text available
Motivation: The BioTIME database contains raw data on species identities and abundances in ecological assemblages through time. These data enable users to calculate temporal trends in biodiversity within and amongst assemblages using a broad range of metrics. BioTIME is being developed as a community-led open-source database of biodiversity time se...
Article
Full-text available
Motivation: The BioTIME database contains raw data on species identities and abundances in ecological assemblages through time. These data enable users to calculate temporal trends in biodiversity within and amongst assemblages using a broad range of metrics. BioTIME is being developed as a community led open-source database of biodiversity time se...
Conference Paper
Methylmercury, the bioavailable form of mercury, is a neurotoxin with well-documented, adverse impacts on natural systems and wildlife populations. Most investigations of methylmercury bioavailability have focused on freshwater aquatic ecosystems; however, recent research has revealed widespread uptake and bioaccumulation in terrestrial biota, incl...
Article
Full-text available
Motivation: The BioTIME database contains raw data on species identities and abundances in ecological assemblages through time. These data enable users to calculate temporal trends in biodiversity within and amongst assemblages using a broad range of metrics. BioTIME is being developed as a community-led open-source database of biodiversity time se...
Article
Full-text available
Background The island of Puerto Rico supports a diverse assemblage of breeding birds, including 16 endemic species (Raffaele et al. 1998), and provides critical wintering habitat for many North American migratory birds (Wunderle and Waide 1994). Despite being a hotspot of avian biodiversity, spatially extensive data on the distribution and abundanc...
Article
Full-text available
Western Chat-Tanagers (Calyptophilus tertius) are a rare and globally vulnerable songbird endemic to the island of Hispaniola. We conducted a radio-telemetry study of non-breeding Western Chat-Tanagers at two adjacent cloud forest sites in Sierra de Bahoruco in southwestern Dominican Republic during March and April of 2010. Male home ranges average...
Article
Full-text available
Citation: Hill, J. M., and J. D. Lloyd. 2017. A fine-scale U.S. population estimate of a montane spruce–fir bird species of conservation concern. Ecosphere 8(8): Abstract. Bicknell's Thrush (Catharus bicknelli) is one of the most range-restricted bird species in North America. In the United States (U.S.), it occurs only in the disturbed montane for...
Article
Full-text available
I used radio-telemetry to track the movements of Mangrove Cuckoos ( Coccyzus minor ) captured in southwest Florida. Relatively little is known about the natural history of Mangrove Cuckoos, and my goal was to provide an initial description of how individuals use space, with a focus on the size and placement of home ranges. I captured and affixed VH...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract: We conducted point counts in the alpine zone of the Presidential Range of the White Mountains, New Hampshire, USA, to estimate the distribution and density of the rare endemic White Mountain Fritillary (Boloria chariclea montinus). Incidence of occurrence and density of the endemic White Mountain Fritillary during surveys in 2012 and 2013...
Technical Report
Full-text available
https://ndownloader.figshare.com/files/8175131
Article
Full-text available
Soft-part coloration can be a useful method for determining the age of a bird. For example, hatch-year and early second-year Mangrove Cuckoos (Coccyzus minor) are supposedly distinguishable from older birds based on the presence of a dusky gray eye-ring; individuals gain a vivid yellow eye-ring in their second year of life that they retain for the...
Preprint
Full-text available
I used radio-telemetry to track the movements of Mangrove Cuckoos ( Coccyzus minor ) captured in southwest Florida. Relatively little is known about the natural history of Mangrove Cuckoos, and my goal was to provide an initial description of how individuals use space, with a focus on the size and placement of home ranges. I captured and affixed VH...
Preprint
Full-text available
I used radio-telemetry to track the movements of Mangrove Cuckoos ( Coccyzus minor ) captured in southwest Florida. Relatively little is known about the natural history of Mangrove Cuckoos, and my goal was to provide an initial description of how individuals use space, with a focus on the size and placement of home ranges. I captured and affixed VH...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This plan documents a strategy for mitigating impacts to breeding habitat of Bicknell's Thrush via conservation actions taken outside of the area of impact. In particular, we show how conservation of wintering habitat in Dominican Republic might be used to offset unavoidable impacts to breeding habitat in the Green Mountain and White Mountain Natio...
Poster
A new effort that uses automated cameras and recording devices to track variation in the phenology of a mountain ecosystem and to understand how changes in the timing of key biological events affects the plants and animals.
Article
Full-text available
Mangrove Cuckoo (Coccyzus minor) exhibits substantial phenotypic variation across its geographic range, but the significance of this variation for taxonomy remains unresolved. Using measurements of bill size and ventral color recorded from 274 museum specimens, I found that variation in these traits was clinal. No named subspecies was reciprocally...
Data
Specimens of Mangrove Cuckoo (Coccyzus minor) arranged geographically to represent general geographic patterns in ventral color. Specimens from Florida and the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands (uppermost left specimen; C. m. maynardi) were palest. Continuing clockwise, ventral color gradually darkened from birds of the Greater Antilles (C. m. nesiote...
Data
Comparison of ventral color between a typically light subspecies and a typically dark subspecies of Mangrove Cuckoo (Coccyzus minor). Specimens with relatively light or relatively dark ventral plumage can be found among any of the named subspecies of Mangrove Cuckoo. For example, although specimens of C. m. maynardi were generally pale (typical spe...
Article
Full-text available
We analyzed temporal trends in mist-net capture rates of resident (n = 8) and overwintering Nearctic-Neotropical migrant (n = 3) bird species at two sites in montane broadleaf forest of the Sierra de Bahoruco, Dominican Republic, with the goal of providing quantitative information on population trends that could inform conservation assessments. We...
Preprint
Full-text available
We analyzed temporal trends in mist-net capture rates of resident (n = 8) and overwintering Nearctic-Neotropical migrant (n = 3) bird species at two sites in montane broadleaf forest of the Sierra de Bahoruco, Dominican Republic, with the goal of providing quantitative information on population trends that could inform conservation assessments. We...
Preprint
Full-text available
We analyzed temporal trends in mist-net capture rates of resident (n = 8) and overwintering Nearctic-Neotropical migrant (n = 3) bird species at two sites in montane broadleaf forest of the Sierra de Bahoruco, Dominican Republic, with the goal of providing quantitative information on population trends that could inform conservation assessments. We...
Article
Full-text available
Florida's mangroves provide habitat for an eclectic mix of bird species, including five taxa rarely found elsewhere in North America. Little is known of the natural history of any of these birds, which poses an obstacle to effective conservation. To help fill some of the basic gaps in our understanding of this avifauna, we conducted extensive surve...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of dispersal patterns and survival rates is essential to understand population dynamics and demography, and to develop effective long-term management strategies for species of conservation concern. In New England, Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) were extirpated as a breeding species in the 1960s. Following a captive breeding and rele...
Article
Full-text available
Point-count surveys are useful in collecting information on breeding birds; however, species that are elusive, occupy dense forests, or call infrequently may be under-sampled. In this study, we examined the responsiveness of Coccyzus minor (Mangrove Cuckoo) to call playbacks in southern Florida from May to June in both 2010 and 2011. Our objective...
Article
Full-text available
Managers of natural areas often employ controlled disturbances as a tool to manage plant and animal populations. This approach assumes that disturbances are responsible for the structure of biological communities and that appropriate application of the disturbance will ensure the persistence of native plants and animals. If species in a community d...
Article
Full-text available
Standing dead trees, or snags, are an important habitat element for many animal species. In many ecosystems, fire is a primary driver of snag population dynamics because it can both create and consume snags. The objective of this study was to examine how variation in two key components of the fire regime—fire-return interval and season of burn—af-f...
Article
Full-text available
Natural-history writing comes in many flavors. Sometimes it takes the form of a catalog of observations of plants and animals, other times it presents accounts of exploration and adventure in the wild, and sometimes it is as much about the people as the landscape that shapes them. Nonetheless, perhaps because its subjects and themes appear so const...
Article
Full-text available
At the broadest spatial scales, the distribution of south Florida slash pine (Pinus elliottii var. densa Little and Dorman) is limited by variation in fire and hydrological regimes, occurring only in relatively dry areas and succeeding to hardwood hammocks when fire is absent. These same forces also appear important in driving smaller-scale variati...
Article
Full-text available
The avifauna of south Florida's mangrove forests is unique and relatively unstudied. The population status of landbirds that breed in these forests is currently unknown, and this lack of information is especially problematic for species that have North American ranges limited almost exclusively to Florida's mangroves. To address this information ga...
Article
Full-text available
Grand Bahama's pine forests are home to a unique but largely unstudied avifauna. No recent comprehensive survey has been conducted in these forests and little is known about the abundance and distribution of the island's pineland birds. This lack of information hinders efforts to monitor avian population trends, identify and protect areas important...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT  Species reintroductions are used commonly as a tool for conservation, but rigorous, quantitative assessments of their outcome rarely occur. Such assessments are critical for determining success of the reintroduction and for identifying management actions needed to ensure persistence of reintroduced populations. We collected 9 years of dem...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and fragmentation have been identified as important factors in the decline of grassland bird populations. However, population declines are apparent even in prairie ecosystems that remain relatively intact suggesting that additional factors are involved. The degradation of breeding habitat may be one such factor, but few studies have ex...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the link between habitat use and components of fitness can yield useful insight into the environmental conditions necessary for population maintenance and can help promote effective habitat management. This information is especially important for species that are in decline or otherwise of conservation concern. Populations of brown-he...
Article
Full-text available
The response of plants and animals in the pine forests of southern Florida to variation in fire and hydrological regimes remains inadequately described, hindering the ability of resource managers to manipulate fire and water to achieve desired ecological outcomes. In this study, we took advantage of natural variation in two measures of fire history...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of landscape fragmentation on nest predation and brood parasitism, the two primary causes of avian reproductive failure, have been difficult to generalize across landscapes, yet few studies have clearly considered the context and spatial scale of fragmentation. Working in two river systems fragmented by agricultural and rural-housing de...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and fragmentation have been identified as important factors in the decline of grassland bird populations. However, population declines are apparent even in prairie ecosystems that remain relatively intact suggesting that additional factors are involved. The degradation of breeding habitat may be one such factor, but few studies have ex...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal preferences for oviposition sites are assumed to be adaptive, but offspring fitness is not always higher at preferred sites and, thus, further study of the selection pressures that influence oviposition behavior is warranted. Among birds, predation is regarded as the primary agent of selection on nest-site microhabitat preferences, but alt...
Article
Full-text available
Sibling competition has been proposed as an important evolutionary pressure driving interspecific variation in developmental rates. We tested this hypothesis using rates of extra-pair paternity and brood parasitism, as well as the degree of hatching asynchrony, as indices of sibling competition in a comparative analysis of 70 species of bird. We fo...
Article
Full-text available
We examined short-term trends in relative abundance and species richness of breeding and wintering grassland birds before (1996) and after (1997, 1998) a prescribed burn in a mesquite-invaded, desert grassland at Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. We surveyed birds and sampled vegetation along 1-km line transects bisecting 14 (7 contro...
Article
Full-text available
Positive interactions often play an important role in structuring plant communities and increasing biological diversity. Using three scales of resolution, we examine the importance of a long-lived desert tree, ironwood (Olneya tesota) in structuring plant communities and promoting biological diversity in the Sonoran Desert. We examined the positive...
Article
Full-text available
We determined which vegetal features influenced the distribution and abundance of grassland birds at the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. The density and distribution of mesquite (Prosopir velutina) exerted the strongest influence on the grassland bird cotnmunity. Abundances of Pyrrhuloxia (Cardi- nalis sinuatus; 9 = 0.363, P = 0.025...