John Koprowski

John Koprowski
University of Wyoming | UW · Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources

PhD, Biology - University of Kansas; MA, Zoology (Wildlife Ecology) - Southern Illinois Univ at Carbondale

About

238
Publications
67,820
Reads
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3,211
Citations
Introduction
I am Dean and Professor in the Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming. My research focuses on the ecology and conservation of wildlife, especially endangered and threatened species, in ecosystems impacted by humans. I enjoy teaching and collaboration in research with a special interest in facilitating international research opportunities.
Additional affiliations
August 2000 - present
The University of Arizona
Position
  • Professor
August 1992 - July 2000
Willamette University
Position
  • Assistant to Associate Professor
June 1983 - May 1985
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (238)
Article
Full-text available
Gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) are considered a widespread and common species in the southwestern United States, although little is known about their spatial ecology that can inform rabies management strategies. We used data acquired from very high frequency and global positioning system satellite collars on gray foxes in the White Mountains...
Article
Mimicking natural parameters and complexities in zoo conservation breeding programs can facilitate natural physiological and behavioral traits, which in turn can inform more effective species reintroduction efforts. To curtail population declines of threatened narrow-headed gartersnakes (Thamnophis rufipunctatus), the Arizona Center for Nature Cons...
Article
Globally, the threat of endangerment and extinction of small cetaceans was highlighted after the recent extinction of the Chinese River dolphin or Baiji (Lipotes vexillifer). Species with a small population size and a limited geographic range, such as Ganges River dolphins (GRD), are more vulnerable to extinction. The social and behavioral needs of...
Preprint
Substitute species can inform management strategies without exposing endangered species unnecessarily. Further, experimental approaches may help to identify the causes of translocation failures, leading to improve the chances of success. We used a surrogate subspecies, Tamiasciurus fremonti fremonti to test different translocation techniques to inf...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Comprehensive, global information on species' occurrences is an essential biodiversity variable and central to a range of applications in ecology, evolution, biogeography and conservation. Expert range maps often represent a species' only available distributional information and play an increasing role in conservation assessments and macroeco...
Article
Semi-desert grasslands in the southwestern United States have undergone significant ecological changes as a result of anthropogenic activities beginning in the 1800s. As efforts to restore semi-desert grasslands continue, importance should be placed on understanding the habitat requirements of species, and their relationships with other plants and...
Article
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Interspecific interactions among mesocarnivores can influence community dynamics and resource partitioning. Insights into these interactions can enhance understanding of local ecological processes that have impacts on pathogen transmission, such as the rabies lyssavirus. Host species ecology can provide an important baseline for disease management...
Article
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The trade of non-native pets, especially of non-domesticated and exotic animals, and their subsequent release and establishment of populations is one of the major pathways of introduction for invasive alien reptiles, amphibia, birds and mammals. Here, we use a group of arboreal mammals, tree squirrels of the genus Callosciurus, as a well-documented...
Preprint
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Based on an ethnozoological study carried out from December 2018 to November 2019, this paper attempts to document the usage of squirrel species for various purposes by the Adi, Idu Mishmi, Miju Mishmi, Tangsa, Chakma and Monpa tribe living near the villages adjoining the protected areas located in the districts of East Siang, Lower Dibang Valley,...
Article
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Land use change can result in complex environments of varying habitat quality and permeability that directly and indirectly influence the effectiveness of natural areas for wildlife conservation. To assess how isolation and degradation of protected natural areas may affect long‐term conservation efforts across the range of a sensitive subspecies, w...
Article
Etymologies are explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 to 2,000 years ago. When Linnaeus in the mid-1700s began naming animals with a binomial nomenclature, he based names on the Latin Grammatical Form. Since many names have Latin or Greek roots, the name for an animal is the same throughout the world because Latin is no long...
Article
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Population decline and extinction risk of river dolphins are primarily associated with flow alteration. Previous studies predominantly highlighted maintenance of adequate flow for low water seasons when habitats contract and the risk of local extinction escalates. Although river dolphins are sensitive to reduction in river flow, no studies quantify...
Article
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Tremarctos ornatus (F.G. Cuvier, 1825) is a tremarctine bear commonly known as the Andean bear. It is a medium-sized bear with black to dark red-brown pelage with dense, long, coarse fur; creamy white marks occur on the chin, neck, and chest, and often white to creamy marks occur on the face, around the muzzle, and eyes. It is distributed in the tr...
Article
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Roads and traffic can cause animal mortality. Specifically, roads serve as barriers by impeding animal movement, resulting in demographic and genetic consequences. Drainage structures, such as culverts, can provide linkages between habitat patches. However, the potential of small culverts with diameters of <60 cm (e.g., wildlife passages that facil...
Article
Drought, past fire suppression, insect invasion, and high-severity fire represent a disturbance cascade characteristic of forests in the western United States. The result is altered forest ecosystems diminished in their function and capacity to support biodiversity. Small habitat specialists are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of disturbance...
Article
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Many environmental flow (e-flow) studies and applications have predominantly used state—(i.e., at a single time point) and rate—(i.e., temporal change) based demographic characteristics of species representing lower trophic levels (e.g., fish communities) to build flow-ecology relationships, rather than using a process that incorporates population...
Article
Caracal caracal (Schreber, 1776) is a felid commonly called the caracal. It is a slender, medium-sized cat (5.8–22 kg) characterized by a short tail and long ear tufts. C. caracal has a wide distribution and is found throughout Africa, north to the Arabian Peninsula, the Middle East, central and southwest Asia into India; its habitat includes arid...
Article
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Resources that an individual selects contrasted against what is available can provide valuable information regarding species-specific behavior and ecological relationships. Small mammals represent excellent study organisms to assess such relationships. Isolated populations that exist on the edge of a species' distribution often exhibit behavioral a...
Article
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Abstract Here we quantify the effects of artisanal fisheries on the ecology of a small cetacean, the Ganges River dolphin (Platanista gangetica gangetica, GRD), in a large river system of Nepal. We examine the size-classes of fisheries’ catches, behavioural changes in GRD in response to fishing activities, and diel overlap between GRD and fishing a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Population decline and extinction risk of riverine cetaceans are primarily associated with flow alteration. Previous studies predominantly highlighted maintenance of adequate flow for low water seasons when habitats contract and the risk of local extinction escalates. Although riverine cetaceans are sensitive to reduction in river flow, no studies...
Article
Communication plays an integral role in facilitating intra- and interspecific interactions. The study of signal function and content reveals the rules that govern such interactions, informing hypotheses in behavioural ecology and evolution. The ubiquitous nature of antipredator vocalizations in ground squirrels provides a useful model for studying...
Article
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Tree and shrub proliferation has been widespread in grasslands worldwide, and has altered ecosystem function and wildlife habitat. Several causes have been proposed for the woody plant encroachment phenomenon. The widespread eradication of a native keystone herbivore in North American grasslands, the prairie dog (Cynomys spp.), is one potential con...
Article
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Intraspecific variation in home range size has important implications for the distribution of animals across landscapes and the spatial structuring of population, community, and ecosystem processes. Among species of similar trophic guild and body mass, differences in home range size can reflect extrinsic variables that exert divergent selective for...
Article
In the southwestern United States, climate change and climate-fire dynamics are affecting the distribution of natural and managed ecosystems. Forest obligate species on sky islands can experience a restriction in range with the increase of destructive forest fires. Using presence/absence data collected by hair tubes, we identified key habitat featu...
Article
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Fire events have increased in scale and severity due to hotter, drier conditions brought on by climate change and fire suppression. Extreme fire events can be detrimental to forest specialists, especially populations at the edge of the species range, where conditions can vary from those within the core of the range. The San Bernardino flying squirr...
Article
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The Ganges–Brahmaputra–Meghna and Karnaphuli (GBMK) River Basin in Nepal, India, and Bangladesh is among the world's most biodiverse river basins. However, human‐induced habitat modification processes threaten the ecological structure of this river basin. Among the GBMK’s diverse flora and fauna of this freshwater ecosystem, the endemic Ganges Rive...
Article
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Food hoarding is a common behavior used by a variety of animals to cope with periods of low food availability. At the retreating edge of species’ distribution, the stressful environment and unfavourable climate conditions may impose severe costs on hoarding behavior. Since relict populations are hotspots for evolution and adaptation, and considerin...
Poster
Ex situ (zoo-based) conservation breeding and reintroduction programs are invaluable resources for saving animals from extinction. Incorporating naturalistic parameters (e.g., habitat-structure, prey-capture, social structures) can optimize ex situ conditions to facilitate program goals, and in-turn, temporal empirical data from zoo populations can...
Book
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A full-text version of the book is not available although individual chapters may be available from authors once the book has been published.
Article
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Habitat fragmentation and loss caused by road development are recognized as major threats to biodiversity and challenges to reconcile the pursuit of economic growth with the protection of wildlife habitats. Assessment of potential environmental impacts is essential in planning and design of road projects. Behavioral responses such as road avoidance...
Article
Full-text available
In the face of climate change, more research is needed to understand how animals adjust to dynamic ecosystems. Seasonal environments offer a unique opportunity to observe how animals use the landscape in a fluctuating system. The antelope jackrabbit (Lepus alleni) is an understudied lagomorph found in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona, USA and Mexico....
Article
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• Niche overlap between native species and ecologically similar invaders can lead to competitive exclusion of threatened native species, but if two such species also co‐occur naturally elsewhere, interactions between native and introduced populations may mirror coevolved niche partitioning that reduces competition and promotes coexistence. • A sing...
Article
Shrub encroachment into arid grasslands has been associated with reduced grass abundance, increased soil erosion, and local declines in biodiversity. Livestock over-grazing and the associated reduction of fine fuels has been a primary driver of shrub encroachment in the southwestern United States, but shrublands continue to persist despite livestoc...
Article
Full-text available
SUMMERY The few remaining individuals of the endangered Ganges river dolphin (Platanista gangetica gangetica) are currently limited to only three river systems of Nepal with a best estimate of less than 28 individuals. Reduced concern, lessened awareness and bias investment strategies from stakeholders directly contribute to the process of extirpat...
Article
The Korean Peninsula and its associated Pacific islands have a distinctive, yet poorly studied mammalian fauna. Korea was a land of invasions and wars for many centuries. The loss of large mammals per unit area that has occurred in Korea may have been greater than in any other country. The peninsula has a depauperate rodent community. The forests a...
Article
The Korean Peninsula and its associated Pacific islands have a distinctive, yet poorly studied mammalian fauna. Korea was a land of invasions and wars for many centuries. The loss of large mammals per unit area that has occurred in Korea may have been greater than in any other country. The peninsula has a depauperate rodent community. The forests a...
Poster
Abstract: Zoo-based reintroduction efforts (i.e., conservation breeding programs) are invaluable resources for saving animals from extinction. Zoos can function as genetic repositories, raise community conservation awareness, and facilitate species reintroductions. Moreover, adaptive management strategies developed ex situ to better understand the...
Article
Full-text available
Microsciurus santanderensis (Hernández-Camacho, 1957) is a sciurid commonly called the Santander dwarf squirrel. M. santanderensis is a small tree squirrel with orange and black mixed fur and is 1 of 4 species in the genus Microsciurus. Endemic to Colombia, South America, in forests at elevations up to 3,800 m, M. santanderensis is listed as "Data...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Polyestry in Mt. Graham Red Squirrels (Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis) Provides Clues to Developing an ex situ Propagation for Release Program, Stuart A. Wells1, John Koprowski2 1 T The University of Arizona, School of Natural Resources and the Environment, ENR2, 1064 East Lowell Street, PO Box 210137, Tucson, AZ 85721 stuartwells@email.ariz...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Zoo-based ex situ conservation breeding programs are invaluable resources to conserve at-risk wildlife species. Zoos can function as genetic repositories, raise community awareness for conservation support, and facilitate species reintroduction or population augmentation. Moreover, adaptive management strategies developed ex situ can inform reintro...
Article
Full-text available
Entomopathogenic fungi are considered to be a safe microbiological pesticide alternative to chemical control. Efforts are underway to understand precisely their taxonomy and natural distribution through mycological and biodiversity studies based on molecular markers. Here, we present descriptions of the diversity of the entomopathogenic fungi in th...
Article
The keystone species concept was introduced in 1969 in reference to top-down regulation of communities by predators, but has expanded to include myriad species at different trophic levels. Keystone species play disproportionately large, important roles in their ecosystems, but human-wildlife conflicts often drive population declines. Population dec...
Chapter
Rainforests support the highest biodiversity on Earth but are one of the most threatened ecosystems due to forest destruction and predicted effects of climate change. Mammals are an important component of rainforest ecosystems, and mammal diversity cannot be explained by forest type alone, but also by considering vertical stratification of the fore...
Article
Intraspecific variation in ranging and social behavior can be perplexing, but also provides an opportunity to assess which behavioral attributes are labile in the face of geographic variation in resources. White-nosed coatis (Nasua narica) are group-living carnivores of tropical origin that possess an unusual social system. In the resource-rich tro...
Article
Disturbance events can alter habitat properties, leading to species displacement, isolation, and/or local extinction. Therefore, understanding the interactions of potential ecological drivers on native and introduced wildlife species post-fire is critical to understand influences on distribution. We studied native Arizona gray squirrels (Sciurus ar...
Article
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Sciurus sanborni Osgood, 1944 is a rodent commonly called Sanborn’s squirrel or ardilla de Sanborn. S. sanborni is a small squirrel with olive brown dorsum, buff eye rings, and usually, white underparts. S. sanborni is 1 of 28 species in the genus Sciurus, and a rare endemic of Peru that is found in lowland Amazonian forest between 300 and 580 m el...
Article
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Sciurus aureogaster Cuvier, 1829 is a sciurid commonly called the red-bellied squirrel. It is a medium-bodied tree squirrel quite variable in color throughout its geographic distribution; partial and complete melanism are common. One of 28 species in the genus, S. aureogaster is endemic to Mexico and Guatemala, and introduced to the Florida Keys, U...
Poster
Full-text available
Wildlife conservation and management requires focused, detailed information about a species distribution, demography, and systematics to assist with science-based, informed actions. There are numerous tools that researchers and managers use to gain knowledge about species and communities, including those at-risk. Augmentation of novel techniques ca...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Wildlife conservation and management requires focused, detailed information about a species distribution, demography, and dynamics to assist with science-based, informed actions. There are numerous tools that researchers and managers use to gain knowledge about species and communities, including enigmatic and declining species. Augmentation of nove...
Article
Full-text available
ContextNatal dispersal links population dynamics to landscape connectivity. Understanding how organisms perceive barriers to movement, or landscape resistance, during natal dispersal is important to conserve and manage populations threatened by fragmentation and habitat loss. Objectives We aimed to (1) model probability of landscape use by an endan...
Article
Full-text available
Fire is a natural component of, and serves as a tool for, the restoration of forested ecosystems worldwide; however, disturbance due to fire also has been implicated in the proliferation of invasive species. How these fires affect occupancy and use of the forest by wildlife is of great concern, in particular, the differential response of non-native...
Chapter
Full-text available
Grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) are an arboreal species that construct leaf nests (dreys) high in the woodland canopy. They will also den within tree cavities and inside artificial den sites such as wooden boxes. Occasionally, individuals will build a nest within the eaves or attic roof spaces of buildings. In this paper we review the nesting...
Chapter
Full-text available
Eastern grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) have been introduced to numerous locations around the globe and are considered to be one of the world’s worst invasive species. The species has become notorious for its role as a biological invasive and a pest outside of its natural distribution. The basic ecology of the species does not appear to diffe...
Chapter
Full-text available
Invasive alien species (IAS) comprise a global threat to biodiversity and may also cause economic harm by damaging natural resources and property. Indirect costs associated with IAS control and protection of native species add further economic burdens. The eastern grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is a successful invader in Europe, and this chap...