John Jaenike

John Jaenike
University of Rochester | UR · Department of Biology

PhD

About

199
Publications
16,120
Reads
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9,830
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
2932 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Additional affiliations
July 1983 - present
University of Rochester
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (199)
Article
Obligate symbioses involving intracellular bacteria have transformed eukaryotic life, from providing aerobic respiration and photosynthesis to enabling colonization of previously inaccessible niches, such as feeding on xylem and phloem, and surviving in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. A major challenge in the study of obligate symbioses is to understa...
Article
Significance Obligate symbioses are intimate associations between species in which neither partner can live without the other. It is challenging to study how obligate symbioses arise because they are often ancient and it is difficult to uncover early or intermediate stages. We have discovered a nascent obligate symbiosis involving Howardula aoronym...
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Associations between endosymbiotic bacteria and their hosts represent a complex ecosystem within organisms ranging from humans to protozoa. Drosophila species are known to naturally harbor Wolbachia and Spiroplasma endosymbionts, which play a protective role against certain microbial infections. Here, we investigated whether the presence or absence...
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Symbiotic interactions between microbes and animals are common in nature. Symbiotic organisms are particularly common in insects and, in some cases, they may protect their hosts from pathogenic infections. Wolbachia and Spiroplasma endosymbionts naturally inhabit various insects including Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies. Therefore, this symbiot...
Article
The phylogenetic incongruence between insects and their facultative maternally-transmitted endosymbionts indicates that these infections are generally short-lived evolutionarily. Therefore, long-term persistence of many endosymbionts must depend on their ability to colonize and spread within new host species. At least 17 species of Drosophila are i...
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Wolbachia are maternally transmitted endosymbionts that often alter their arthropod hosts' biology to favor the success of infected females, and they may also serve as a speciation microbe driving reproductive isolation. Two of these host manipulations include killing males outright and reducing offspring survival when infected males mate with unin...
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Drosophila suzukii recently invaded North America and Europe. Populations in Hawaii, California, New York and Nova Scotia are polymorphic for Wolbachia, typically with <20% infection frequency. The Wolbachia in D. suzukii, denoted wSuz, is closely related to wRi, the variant prevalent in continental populations of D. simulans. wSuz is also nearly i...
Article
Maternally transmitted symbionts persist over macroevolutionary timescales by undergoing occasional lateral transfer to new host species. To invade a new species, a symbiont must survive and reproduce in the new host, undergo maternal transmission, and confer a selective benefit sufficient to overcome losses due to imperfect maternal transmission....
Article
Facultative symbionts can represent important sources of adaptation for their insect hosts and thus have the potential for rapid spread. Drosophila neotestacea harbours a heritable symbiont, Spiroplasma, that confers protection against parasitic nematodes. We previously found a cline in Spiroplasma prevalence across central Canada, ending abruptly...
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SUMMARY Parasites in the genus Onchocerca infect humans, ruminants, camels, horses, suids, and canids, with effects ranging from relatively benign to debilitating. In North America, Onchocerca cervipedis is the sole species known to infect cervids, while at least 5 Onchocerca species infect Eurasian cervids. In this study, we report the discovery o...
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Wolbachia manipulate insect host biology through a variety of means that result in increased production of infected females, enhancing its own transmission. A Wolbachia strain (wInn) naturally infecting Drosophila innubila induces male killing, while native strains of D. melanogaster and D. simulans usually induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI)....
Article
Many maternally inherited endosymbionts manipulate their host's reproduction in various ways to enhance their own fitness. One such mechanism is male killing (MK), in which sons of infected mothers are killed by the endosymbiont during development. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the advantages of MK, including resource reallocatio...
Article
Most species of insects are infected with heritable, facultative symbionts. Such symbionts first appear within a host lineage as a result of lateral transfer from other host species. Although some facultative symbionts are reproductive parasites and thus adversely affect the transmission of host nuclear genes, there is growing evidence that many ar...
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Drosophila quinaria is polymorphic for infection with Wolbachia, a maternally transmitted endosymbiont. Wolbachia-infected individuals carry mtDNA that is only distantly related to the mtDNA of uninfected individuals, and the clade encompassing all mtDNA haplotypes within D. quinaria also includes the mtDNA of several other species of Drosophila. N...
Article
Maternally transmitted endosymbionts are widespread among insects, but how they are maintained within host populations is largely unknown. Recent discoveries show that some endosymbionts protect their hosts from pathogens or parasites. Spiroplasma, an endosymbiont of Drosophila neotestacea, protects female hosts from the sterilizing effects of para...
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Full-text available
Recent studies have shown that some plants and animals harbor microbial symbionts that protect them against natural enemies. Here we demonstrate that a maternally transmitted bacterium, Spiroplasma, protects Drosophila neotestacea against the sterilizing effects of a parasitic nematode, both in the laboratory and the field. This nematode parasitize...
Article
Wolbachia infect a variety of arthropod and nematode hosts, but in arthropods, host phylogenetic relationships are usually poor predictors of strain similarity. This suggests that new infections are often established by horizontal transmission. To gain insight into the factors affecting the probability of horizontal transmission among host species,...
Article
Interspecific mutualism can evolve when specific lineages of different species tend to be associated with each other from one generation to the next. Different maternally transmitted endosymbionts occurring within the same cytoplasmic lineage fulfil this requirement. Drosophila neotestacea is infected with maternally transmitted Wolbachia and Spiro...
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Full-text available
The population-level dynamics of maternally transmitted endosymbionts, including reproductive parasites, depends primarily on the fitness effects and transmission fidelity of these infections. Although experimental laboratory studies have shown that within-host endosymbiont density can affect both of these factors, the existence of such effects in...
Article
Many insect species are infected with maternally transmitted endosymbionts, the most widely documented being Wolbachia. The rate of spread and equilibrium of prevalence of these infections depend on two parameters – maternal transmission fidelity and relative fitness of infected cytoplasmic lineages. Both transmission fidelity and the phenotypic ef...
Article
1. Long-term control of insects by parasites is possible only if the parasite populations persist. Because parasite transmission rate depends on host density, parasite populations may go extinct during periods of low host density. Vertical transmission of parasites, however, is independent of host density and may therefore provide a demographic bri...
Article
Maternally transmitted male-killing endosymbionts can exert strong and relentless selection pressure on their hosts to evolve resistance to these infections. Surveys of current infection prevalence and mtDNA diversity indicate that Drosophila innubila is and has been infected with male-killing Wolbachia at moderate frequencies for extended evolutio...
Article
Drosophila recens is parasitized in the wild by two nematodes, Howardula aoronymphium, a host generalist, and Parasitylenchus nearcticus, a host specialist known only from D. recens. In order to understand how these two parasite species coexist, we compared their ability to infect and grow in D. recens, their effects on host fecundity and survival,...
Article
Key Words intragenomic conflict, levels of selection, evolutionary genetics, segregation distortion, sex ratio s Abstract Sex chromosome drive refers to the unequal transmission of X and Y chromosomes from individuals of the heterogametic sex, resulting in biased sex ratios among progeny and within populations. The presence of driving sex chromosom...
Article
Individuals within natural populations of Drosophila tripunctata and D. falleni varied significantly in their responses to alternative types of food baits; no such variation was detected in D. putrida. The food type at which laboratory-reared D. melanogaster tended to settle in the field was influenced by the type of food on which they had been kep...
Article
Wolbachia are among the most widespread symbionts on the earth. They spread within populations by various means of manipulating host reproduction, including cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), male-killing (MK), parthenogenesis, and feminization. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Wolbachia have the potential to undergo rapid evolutionary change in...
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Worm et al. (Research Articles, 3 November 2006, p. 787) used a power relation to predict a global collapse of fisheries by the year 2048. However, a linear regression of the data for the past 40 years yields an excellent fit, with a predicted date of collapse of 2114. Thus, long-term projections of fisheries collapse are highly dependent on the sp...
Article
Male-killing endosymbionts create a genetic black hole into which host nuclear genes vanish. In a recent paper, Hornett et al. transferred male-killing Wolbachia between different strains of the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina through hybridization and backcrossing. Their results provide unambiguous evidence of genetic variation for resistance to male-...
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Full-text available
The occurrence of closely related strains of maternally transmitted endosymbionts in distantly related insect species indicates that these infections can colonize new host species by lateral transfer, although the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. We investigated whether ectoparasitic mites, which feed on insect haemolymph, can serve as...
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Adaptation by natural selection proceeds most efficiently when alleles compete solely on the basis of their effects on the survival and reproduction of their carriers. A major condition for this is equal Mendelian segregation, but meiotic drive can short-circuit this process. The evolution of drive often involves multiple, interacting genetic compo...
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Reinforcement refers to the evolution of increased mating discrimination against heterospecific individuals in zones of geographic overlap and can be considered a final stage in the speciation process. One the factors that may affect reinforcement is the degree to which hybrid matings result in the permanent loss of genes from a species' gene pool....
Article
Full-text available
Reinforcement refers to the evolution of increased mating discrimination against heterospecific individuals in zones of geographic overlap and can be considered a final stage in the speciation process. One the factors that may affect reinforcement is the degree to which hybrid matings result in the permanent loss of genes from a species' gene pool....