John Jackson

John Jackson
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Zoology

PhD

About

23
Publications
2,649
Reads
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107
Citations
Introduction
My research explores how wildlife populations interact with their environment, how humans will affect them in the future, and how we can use this understanding to conserve biodiversity more generally.
Additional affiliations
June 2014 - August 2014
The University of Manchester
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Population genomics
July 2013 - August 2013
Wildlife Conservation Society
Position
  • Field assistant
Education
October 2015 - October 2019
The University of Sheffield
Field of study
  • Population Ecology
September 2014 - September 2015
The University of Manchester
Field of study
  • Environmental Ecology
September 2011 - June 2014
The University of Manchester
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
With the looming threat of abrupt ecological disruption due to a changing climate, predicting which species are most vulnerable to environmental change is critical. The life-history of a species is an evolved response to its environmental context, and therefore a promising candidate for explaining differences in climate-change responses. However, w...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in individual demographic rates can have large consequences for populations. Female reproductive skew is an example of structured demographic heterogeneity where females have intrinsic qualities that make them more or less likely to breed. The consequences of reproductive skew for population dynamics are poorly understood in non-cooperati...
Preprint
The ecological sciences have joined the big data revolution. However, despite exponential growth in data availability, broader interoperability amongst datasets is still needed to unlock the potential of open access. The interface of demography and functional traits is well-positioned to benefit from said interoperability. Trait-based ecological ap...
Preprint
Image sensing technologies are rapidly increasing the cost-effectiveness of biodiversity monitoring efforts. Species differences in the reflectance of electromagnetic radiation have recently been highlighted as a promising target to estimate plant biodiversity using multispectral image data. However, these efforts are currently hampered by logistic...
Article
Full-text available
Although social behaviour is common in group-living mammals, our understanding of its mechanisms in long-lived animals is largely based on studies in human and non-human primates. There are health and fitness benefits associated with strong social ties, including increased life span, reproductive success, and lower disease risk, which are attribute...
Article
Full-text available
Matrix population models (MPMs) are an important tool for biologists seeking to understand the causes and consequences of variation in vital rates (e.g. survival, reproduction) across life cycles. Empirical MPMs describe the age‐ or stage‐structured demography of organisms and usually represent the life history of a population during a particular t...
Article
Full-text available
In Focus: Culina, A., Adriaensen, F., Bailey, L. D., et al. (2021) Connecting the data landscape of long-term ecological studies: The SPI-Birds data hub. Journal of Animal Ecology, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13388. Long-term, individual-based datasets have been at the core of many key discoveries in ecology, and calls for the collection, cur...
Article
Full-text available
Many mammals grow up with siblings, and interactions between them can influence offspring phenotype and fitness. Among these interactions, sibling competition between different‐age offspring should lead to reproductive and survival costs on the younger sibling, while sibling cooperation should improve younger sibling's reproductive potential and su...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we present a standardized dataset on 6659 songbirds (Passeriformes) highlighting information relevant to species conservation prioritization with a main focus to support the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Data were collected from both scientific and grey literature as well as...
Preprint
Full-text available
Matrix population models (MPMs) are an important tool in the arsenal of biologists seeking to understand the causes and consequences of variation in vital rates (e.g. survival, reproduction) across life cycles. MPMs describe the age- or stage-structured demography of organisms and represent the life history of a population during a particular time...
Preprint
Full-text available
With the looming threat of abrupt ecological disruption due to a changing climate, predicting which species are most vulnerable to environmental change is critical. The life-history of a species is an evolved response to its environmental context, and therefore a promising candidate for explaining differences in climate-change responses. However, w...
Article
Full-text available
We collated and synthesized information on 1,226 Elasmobranch species (i.e., sharks, rays, and skates) globally from a wide range of sources. We obtained curated and standardized data from online databases, legal documents, press releases, and websites. All data were standardized according to the taxonomic nomenclature described in the Catalogue of...
Article
Full-text available
1. A changing environment directly influences birth and mortality rates, and thus population growth rates. However, population growth rates in the short‐term are also influenced by population age‐structure. Despite its importance, the contribution of age‐structure to population growth rates has rarely been explored empirically in wildlife populatio...
Article
The reference intervals of health parameters are valuable tools for veterinarians and conservationists to monitor the health status and viability of endangered species. Natural variation in the health of the long-lived Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is poorly understood, particularly in relation to differences between males and females. Longitudi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The existence of extended post-reproductive lifespan is an evolutionary puzzle, and its taxonomic prevalence is debated. One way of measuring post-reproductive life is with post-reproductive representation, the proportion of adult years lived by females after cessation of reproduction. Analyses of post-reproductive representation in ma...
Article
Capturing wild animals is common for conservation, economic or research purposes. Understanding how capture itself affects lifetime fitness measures is often difficult because wild and captive populations live in very different environments and there is a need for long-term life-history data. Here, we show how wild capture influences reproduction i...
Article
1.Advanced maternal age at birth can have pronounced consequences for offspring health, survival and reproduction. If carried over to the next generation, such fitness effects could have important implications for population dynamics and the evolution of ageing, but these remain poorly understood. While many laboratory studies have investigated mat...
Article
Full-text available
Maintaining sustainable populations in captivity without supplementation through wild-capture is a major challenge in conservation that zoos and aquaria are working towards. However, the capture of wild animals continues for many purposes where conservation is not the primary focus. Wild-capture hinders long-term conservation goals by reducing rema...
Article
Full-text available
Highly conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) constitute a significant proportion of the genomes of multicellular eukaryotes. The function of most CNEs remains elusive, but growing evidence indicates they are under some form of purifying selection. Noncoding regions in many species also harbor large numbers of transposable element (TE) insertions, whi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Highly conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) comprise a significant proportion of the genomes of multicellular eukaryotes. The function of most CNEs remains elusive, but growing evidence indicates they are under some form of purifying selection. Noncoding regions in many species also harbor large numbers of transposable element (TE) insertions, which...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
To identify the ecological and demographic factors that lead to poor population performance in the Cape mountain zebra. To assess variation in social network structure in a population of semi-feral Welsh mountain ponies and measure the physiological response to annual management practices.