John R Giles

John R Giles
Johns Hopkins University | JHU · Department of Epidemiology

BSc, MSc, PhD

About

14
Publications
2,583
Reads
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409
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
370 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
I am a disease ecologist interested in the spatial dynamics of infectious diseases in both human and wildlife populations. https://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=5iA0hjMAAAAJ&hl=en
Additional affiliations
June 2013 - present
Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia
Position
  • PhD Student
July 2010 - July 2013
Northern Arizona University
Position
  • Graduate researcher
July 2006 - July 2010
University of Kansas
Position
  • Undergraduate resesarcher

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Within host-parasite communities, viral co-circulation and co-infections of hosts are the norm, yet studies of significant emerging zoonoses tend to focus on a single parasite species within the host. Using a multiplexed paramyxovirus bead-based PCR on urine samples from Australian flying foxes, we show that multi-viral shedding from flying fox pop...
Preprint
Full-text available
Notable outbreaks of infectious viruses resulting from spillover events from bats have brought much attention to the ecological origins of bat-borne zoonoses, resulting in an increase in ecological and epidemiological studies on bat populations in Africa, Asia, and Australia. The aim of many of these studies is to identify new viral agents with fie...
Article
Full-text available
In the Australian subtropics, flying-foxes (family Pteropididae) play a fundamental ecological role as forest pollinators. Flying-foxes are also reservoirs of the fatal zoonosis, Hendra virus. Understanding flying fox foraging ecology, particularly in agricultural areas during winter, is critical to determine their role in transmitting Hendra virus...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding infection dynamics in animal hosts is fundamental to managing spillover and emergence of zoonotic infections. Hendra virus is endemic in Australian pteropodid bat populations and can be lethal to horses and humans. However, we know little about the factors driving Hendra virus prevalence in resevoir bat populations, making spillover d...
Data
Figure S1. Distribution of the four fruit bat species in Australia and the locations of observed spillover events. Figure S2. A typical reectance curve for Eucalypts and placement of the seven reectance bands of the MCD43A4 MODIS product. Figure S3. Correlation (Pearsons r) between 83 spatial variables and the log total population count at the Sa...
Article
Full-text available
Fruit bats (Pteropodidae) have received increased attention after the recent emergence of notable viral pathogens of bat origin. Their vagility hinders data collection on abundance and distribution, which constrains modeling efforts and our understanding of bat ecology, viral dynamics, and spillover. We addressed this knowledge gap with models and...
Article
Full-text available
Background Acaricide resistant Rhipicephalus microplus populations have become a major problem for many cattle producing areas of the world. Pyrethroid resistance in arthropods is typically associated with mutations in domains I, II, III, and IV of voltage-gated sodium channel genes. In R. microplus, known resistance mutations include a domain II c...
Article
Full-text available
Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a highly-invasive tick that transmits the cattle parasites (Babesia bovis and B. bigemina) that cause cattle fever. R. microplus and Babesia are endemic in Mexico and ticks persist in the United States inside a narrow tick eradication quarantine area (TEQA) along the Rio Grande. This containment area is threat...
Article
Full-text available
For >100 years cattle production in the southern United States has been threatened by cattle fever. It is caused by an invasive parasite-vector complex that includes the protozoan hemoparasites Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, which are transmitted among domestic cattle via Rhipicephalus tick vectors of the subgenus Boophilus. In 1906 an eradication...
Article
Full-text available
Hybridization in ticks has been described in a handful of species and mostly as a result of laboratory experiments. We used 148 AFLP loci to describe putative hybridization events between D. andersoni and D. variabilis in sympatric populations from northwestern North America. Recently, D. variabilis has expanded its range westward into the natural...
Article
Full-text available
Author Summary We analyzed the spatial and environmental distributions of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil from 1966-present, where the disease is now only rarely transmitted to humans, but persists as a zoonosis of native rodent populations. We elucidated environmental correlates of plague occurrences by way of ecological niche modeli...

Network

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project aims to gain further insight into bat viral transmission dynamics by exploring dynamics within a multi-host-multi-pathogen framework.