John R Ford

John R Ford
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

PhD

About

12
Publications
3,286
Reads
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302
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
242 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
University of Melbourne
Education
September 2008 - June 2013
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Marine Science
February 2000 - June 2004
UNSW Sydney
Field of study
  • Science

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Human-driven climate change and habitat modification are negatively impacting coastal ecosystems and the species that reside within them. Uncovering how individuals of key species respond to environmental influences is crucial for effective and responsive coastal resource and fisheries management. Here, using an otolith based analysis, we recreated...
Article
Full-text available
In response to consumer concerns about the sustainability of Australian-sourced seafood we derive a set of criteria within an explicit decision-process that can be used to determine whether locally farmed and wild-caught Australian seafood products meet standards of ecological sustainability and Ecologically Sustainable Development. These criteria...
Article
How landscape context influences density-dependent processes is important, as environmental heterogeneity can confound estimates of density dependence in demographic parameters. Here we evaluate 19 populations in a shoaling temperate reef fish (Trachinops caudimaculatus) metapopulation within a heterogeneous seascape (Port Phillip Bay, Australia) t...
Article
Victoria has lost vast areas (>95%) of native flat oyster (Ostrea angasi, Sowerby 1871) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis galloprovinicialis, Lamarck 1819) reefs from estuarine and coastal waters since European settlement. We document the decline of these reefs by examining indigenous use of shellfish, the decimation of oyster reefs by dredge fishing...
Article
Full-text available
Population connectivity, which is essential for the persistence of benthic marine metapopulations, depends on how life history traits and the environment interact to influence larval production, dispersal and survival. Although we have made significant advances in our understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of these individual processes,...
Article
Full-text available
Marine scientists and environmental managers engaged in a roundtable discussion at the Australian Marine Sciences Association conference in July 2014 to identify areas where linkages could be improved between the two groups. Here, we summarize the key themes and outcomes from the discussion, including the need to clearly define management objective...
Technical Report
The REEF project was established to examine the effect of sea urchins and potential anthropogenic stressors (sediment and nutrients) associated with urbanisation on the local and system-wide dynamics of rocky reefs in Port Phillip Bay (PPB), Victoria. The project explicitly addressed implications for management of resilience of PPB reefs. The REEF...
Article
Australians have a profound love for coastal and marine environments. Whilst iconic destinations such as the Great Barrier Reef, The Twelve Apostles and Rottnest Island annually attract millions of international visitors, Australians on weekends and over the summer holidays flock towards lesser-known, family destinations such as Lakes Entrance, Nam...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying how density and number-dependent processes regulate populations is important for predicting population response to environmental change. Species that live in groups, such as shoaling fish, can experience both direct density-dependent mortality through resource limitation and inverse number-dependent mortality via increased feeding rates...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting the consequences of predator biodiversity loss on prey requires an understanding of multiple predator interactions. Predators are often assumed to have independent and additive effects on shared prey survival; however, multiple predator effects can be non-additive if predators foraging together reduce prey survival (risk enhancement) or...
Article
Full-text available
Although recruitment is often influenced by microhabitat characteristics that affect larval settlement and post-settlement growth and survival, the influence of some habitat features, such as the presence of conspecifics and the accessibility of food, are poorly understood, particularly on temperate reefs. We investigated the ecological determinant...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying and conserving sites with consistently high settlement is necessary for protecting recruitment of coastal fish populations. We investigated the initial settlement patterns of coastally spawned juvenile fish entering 4 temperate estuaries with narrow entrances ( < 500 m wide) on the eastern coast of Australia. Habitat structure (seagrass...

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