John Hall Elliott

John Hall Elliott
University of San Francisco | USFCA · Department of Theology and Religious Studies

Dr. Theol., Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität,

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64
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449
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Publications

Publications (64)
Article
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This article explores a presentation of the method, emergence and contribution of social-scientific criticism (SSC) as an inter-disciplinary operation of New Testament exegesis. A description of ancient evil eye belief and practice and its appearance in Paul's letter to the Galatians illustrates how the method contributes to a more accurate transla...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores a presentation of the method, emergence and contribution of social-scientific criticism (SSC) as an inter-disciplinary operation of New Testament exegesis. A description of ancient evil eye belief and practice and its appearance in Paul's letter to the Galatians illustrates how the method contributes to a more accurate transla...
Article
Full-text available
Christianity and Creation and Jesus of Nazareth are companion volumes that give voice to a veteran scholar’s summing up a lifetime of research and reflection on what he sees as two inseparably related and fundamental issues of Christian theology and biblical witness: a focus on creation and re-creation running through the Bible as a golden thread f...
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This first volume of George Nickelsburg's commentary on 1 Enoch is a masterful commentary on a major text of Second Temple Israel. Its attention to the relation of 1 Enoch and 1 Peter and its openness to analysis through Social—Scientific Criticism invite further discussion.
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Addressing a hostile situation that called for courageous and exemplary leaders, the letter of 1 Peter employed in 5:1-5 a cluster of vocabulary and images (elders, verseers/exercise oversight, shepherds, flock) representing a growing coalescence of terms for leaders and their functions in the early Jesus movement. As one of the earliest witnesses...
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The thirty year history of an SBL Section reveals an essential component of the exegetical enterprise coming of age. Focused from the beginning on the social and cultural dimensions of New Testament writings and their social settings, the Section has undergone notable permutations and cleavages while also reflecting the development, refinement, and...
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Distinguishing between insider and outsider groups and their differing nomenclatures is essential for accurate interpretation and translation. Jesus and his earliest followers, evidence demonstrates, were called `Israelites', `Galileans' or `Nazoreans' by their fellow Israelites. `Israel', `Israelites' were the preferred terms of self-designation a...
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The Catholic Historical Review 90.3 (2004) 522-524 The eight essays of this volume are products of two conferences focused on Clemens Romanus and Clementine tradition held in March and November, 2001, in the city of Rome. English and Italian summaries of each essay conclude the volume, which contains no indices. Alessandro Bausi ("San Clemente e le...
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The search for biblical texts on “homosexuals” and “homosexual activity” presents a particularly prickly problem of contextual reading and interpretation. It involves, among other things, a clash of ancient and modern sexual concepts, constructs, and frames of reference. Attempts at using allegedly relevant texts as moral guidelines today are subje...
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The theory that Jesus founded a "discipleship of equals" that after his death assumed the shape of egalitarian structured house churches, which by the end of the first century abandoned their egalitarian ethos and organization and assimilated to the conventional patriarchal household pattern of their Greco-Roman environment, fails to stand up under...
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The currently-advanced theory that Jesus was an egalitarian who founded a "community of equals" is devoid of social and political plausibility and, more importantly, of textual and historical evidence. Moreover, it distorts the actual historical and social nature of the nascent Jesus movement and constitutes a graphic example of an "idealist fallac...
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A successful merger of exegesis and anthropology and its application to the Pauline letters, Acts, and the Fourth Gospel yields fresh insights into the formation of the early Church, its strategies and rituals, and its interaction with outsiders.
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Honor and shame constituted pivotal values of ancient Circum-Mediterranean societies, including the biblical communities. After summarizing relevant research on this phenomenon by both anthropologists and exegetes, this study focuses attention on the honor/shame vocabulary of 1 Peter and its broader semantic field. The thesis is advanced that the a...
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This book gives a clearly written, authoritative introduction to social-scientific criticism of the New Testament, including the rise of this method, its practitioners and the focal points of their work, how the method is applied to the interpretation of the biblical text, and the presuppositions and procedures of the method. Four appendices; gloss...
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Belief in the malignant force of the Evil Eye and strategies to ward off its destructive power pervaded the cultures of the ancient Near East and Circum-Mediterranean basin. This belief was shared by the biblical communities who in their writings refer frequently to the Evil Eye, its associated dispositions, and means of protection from its injurio...
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The Epistle of James, for too long the object of negative exegetical assessment, deserves a fresh appraisal. This study challenges the prevailing view that the document consists merely of seemingly disjointed hortatory topoi and lacks literary and thematic integrity. It is argued that a rhetorical and social-scientific analysis reveals a complex an...
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The parable of the laborers in the vineyard (Matthew 20:1-15) contains one of numerous biblical references to the Evil Eye. Belief in the Evil Eye, its expression of envy, and its destructive power pervaded the ancient world of the Circum-Mediterranean. The frequent references to the Evil Eye in the Bible—modern translations and commentaries notwit...
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In Luke-Acts the social codes and concepts associated with food and meals replicate and support the contrasting social codes, interests, and ideologies associated with the Jerusalem Temple, on the one hand, and the Christian household, on the other. In this study the thesis is advanced that in contrast to the Temple and the exclusivist purity and l...
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In Luke-Acts the social codes and concepts associated with food and meals replicate and support the contrasting social codes, interests, and ideologies associated with the Jerusalem Temple, on the one hand, and the Christian household, on the other. In this study the thesis is advanced that in contrast to the Temple and the exclusivist purity and l...
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Full-text available
This social-scientific study of Luke-Acts advances the thesis that in the Lucan economy of salvation, the Temple and the Household represent opposed types of social institutions and economic relations, only one of which, the Household, is capable of embodying socially, symbohcally and ideologically the structures, values and goals of an inclusive g...
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Through the centuries, engagement with the Bible has served as a barometer (recording and reflec­ting the history of shifting circumstances), as a beacon (constituting a source of light illuminating theological reflection and guiding human conduct) and as a bellwether (leading the way in setting new agendas for the Church, her theology and her enco...
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I often have heard boxing fans remark that the prize ring reveals life the way it really is. The elemental combat between two individuals, the primal physical struggle, the quest for glory and fear of humiliation, all contribute to the belief that men in the ring are in touch with life's underlying realities. Significantly, depicting “life the way...
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Auch im Buchh. als: Novum Testamentum Supplements. Vol. 12 Münster, Ev.-theol. F., Diss. v. 9. Nov. 1963 (Nicht f. d. Aust.).

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