John William Chapman

John William Chapman
Oregon State University | OSU · Department of Fisheries Wildlife and Conservation Biology

PhD

About

62
Publications
16,359
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1,702
Citations
Citations since 2017
22 Research Items
720 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Additional affiliations
February 1984 - present
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (62)
Article
Full-text available
Background. Females of the gammaridean amphipod Ampelisca eschrichtii with signs of regenerating, previously atrophied ovaries were recovered from the northeastern shelf of Sakhalin Island (Okhotsk Sea, Russia). Ovarian regeneration was previously unknown for any amphipod species. A. eschrichtii have a predominantly 2-year life cycle (from embryo t...
Article
Full-text available
We utilized methods of sediment cultivation, catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the presence of novel filamentous cable bacteria (CB) in estuarine sediments bioturbated by the mud shrimp Upogebia pugettensis Dana and also to test for trophic con...
Article
Full-text available
Background. Ampelisca eschrichtii Krøyer, 1842 of the Sakhalin Shelf of the Okhotsk Sea, Far Eastern Russia, comprise the highest known biomass concentration of any amphipod population in the world and are a critically important prey source for western gray whales. Growth and reproduction in this population has not been apparent in summer. However,...
Data
Quartile proportions of vitellogenic oocyte (VO) diameters (maximum, upper quartile, mean, median, lower quartile and minimum) among F0, FII and FIV stage females
Data
Tables 1–3 raw data Body length (mm), Brood Development, Development, Condition Embryos, F0 Oocytes, FII Oocytes, FIV Oocytes, Collection Date
Data
Figure 6 raw data Source, Species, Average Body Length (mm), Average Brood Count, Embryo Diameter (mm), 2015 egg development, A. e. oocytes, F0 VO, FII VO, FIV VO, 2002+2011, estimated weight (Wt), estimated egg diameter (Est. ED), Coll. Date, female brood development (Fem. Dev.), Development, Condition (VO= vitellogenic oocyte)
Data
Figure 5 raw data Species, Site, Sample, Region, Body Length (mm), Weight (g), Sex, Brood development Index, Collection Jul + Sep 2015, Embryo development Notes, Date, Expected Brood Size (Exp. BS)
Preprint
Full-text available
Background. Ampelisca eschrichtii Krøyer, 1842 of the Sakhalin Shelf of the Okhotsk Sea, Far Eastern Russia, comprise the highest known biomass concentration of any amphipod population in the world and are a critically important prey source for western gray whales. Growth and reproduction in this population has not been apparent in summer. However,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background. Ampelisca eschrichtii Krøyer, 1842 of the Sakhalin Shelf of the Okhotsk Sea, Far Eastern Russia, comprise the highest known biomass concentration of any amphipod population in the world and are a critically important prey source for western gray whales. Growth and reproduction in this population has not been apparent in summer. However,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ampelisca eschrichtii Krøyer, 1842 of the Sakhalin Shelf of the Okhotsk Sea, Far Eastern Russia, comprise the highest known biomass concentration of any amphipod population in the world and are a critically important prey source for western gray whales. The high prevalence of atrophied ovaries, undersized and damaged oocytes, undersized broods of e...
Preprint
Full-text available
Populations of the gammaridean amphipod crustacean, Ampelisca eschrichtii on eastern Sakhalin Island Shelf of Far Eastern Russia occur below surface water strata that contain high densities of their phytoplankton food sources. These populations do not appear to grow in summer but winter samples to test directly whether they grow in winter have not...
Article
Full-text available
Twelve species of sponges (Calcarea and Demospongiae) were found on Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris (JTMD) that washed ashore in Oregon, Washington, and Hawai‘i. All taxa but one determined to species level are amphi-Pacific, with three having type localities in California (Leucosolenia eleanor Urban, 1906, Hymeniacidon sinapium de Laubenfels, 1930,...
Article
Full-text available
The devastating tsunami of March 2011 on the Pacific coast of Japan produced abundant marine debris which drifted across the Pacific Ocean to North America. Here we document rafting of the Japanese yellowtail jack Seriola aureovittata Temminck & Schlegel, 1845 (Carangidae) across the North Pacific inside a tsunami-generated derelict vessel. Long-di...
Article
Full-text available
Twenty-eight species of hydroids are now known from Japanese tsunami marine debris (JTMD) sent to sea in March 2011 from the Island of Honshu and landing between 2012 and 2016 in North America and Hawai‘i. To 12 JTMD hydroid species previously reported, we add an additional 16 species. Fourteen species (50%) were detected only once; given the small...
Article
Full-text available
The Western Pacific Ocean barred knifejaw Oplegnathus fasciatus was found from 2013 to 2015 along the Pacific Coast of North America from Washington to California. The knifejaw was found in derelict vessels that had arrived on the Pacific Coast and that had been lost during the March 2011 Great Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Knifejaw were also found...
Article
Full-text available
Biofouled debris from the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami has landed in the Northeast Pacific and along the Hawaiian Islands since 2012. As of 2017, >630 biofouled debris items with >320 living species of algae, invertebrates, and fish have been examined. The invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis was present on >50% of those items....
Article
Full-text available
Long-distance life rafting When coastal ecosystems are affected by storms or tsunamis, organisms can be rafted across oceans on floating debris. However, such events are rarely observed, still less quantified. Carlton et al. chart the rafting journeys of coastal marine organisms across the Pacific Ocean after the 2011 East Japan earthquake and tsun...
Article
Full-text available
Dramatic, rapid, population declines of the native North American burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis (Dana, 1852) are associated with intense infestations by the introduced Asian bopyrid isopod parasite, Orthione griffenis Markham, 2004. However, expected host weight losses with increasing parasite weights do not occur, even among apparently cas...
Article
Full-text available
Ampelisca eschrichtii are among the most important prey of the Western North Pacific gray whales, Eschrichtius robustus. The largest and densest known populations of this amphipod occur in the gray whale’s Offshore feeding area on the Northeastern Sakhalin Island Shelf. The remote location, ice cover and stormy weather at the Offshore area have pre...
Data
Sediment associated A. eschrichtii length frequencies. Clusters AI, AII and B (left) of 2002 to 2013 correspond to the decreasing frequencies of large and older A. eschrichtii (right) among sediment types: Sf–fine sand; Sls–silty sand; Sm–medium sand and; Ssl–sandy silt (data in S1 and S2 Tables). (PDF)
Data
Sample and population data. Sampling dates, site designations, replicates per station, latitude (N) and longitude (E), depth, bottom temperature (T), practical salinity units (PSU), sediment type, number of measured specimens (n, ind), individuals m-2 (N m-2) and estimated grams biomass m-2 (B, g m-2). (PDF)
Data
Granulometry. Sites containing Ampelisca eschrichtii in 2007 and 2008 with predominant grain size highlighted in red. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
The Asian isopod Ianiropsis serricaudis is now well established in fouling communities, often associated with introduced ascidians, throughout the Northern Hemisphere but has gone largely unnoticed because of its diminutive size (typically less than 3 mm in length) and the difficulties of identifying small peracarid crustaceans. Known locations inc...
Article
Full-text available
Fourteen species of hydroids, including two anthoathecates and 12 leptothecates, are reported from the west coast of North America on debris from the tsunami that struck Japan on 11 March 2011. Six species were found on a dock that stranded at Agate Beach, Newport, Oregon, five from a boat at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, four from a dock in Olympic Nati...
Article
Declines or extinctions of the native northeast Pacific intertidal blue mud shrimp, Upogebia pugettensis (Dana, 1852), over the species range are directly associated with intense infestations by the introduced Asian bopyrid isopod parasite, Orthione griffenis Markham, 2004. Single point sampling sites and anecdotal records poorly resolve how this i...
Article
Full-text available
The R/V Oceanus completed a 9,789 km, 28 day passage from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, in the Atlantic Ocean, through the Panama Canal to Yaquina Bay, Oregon, in the Pacific Ocean on 21 February 2012. The Oceanus had previously operated in the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean (including the Caribbean Sea). We document the sequential acquisition o...
Article
Full-text available
Supplementary information to: Non-natives: 141 scientists object Full list of co-signatories to a Correspondence published in Nature 475, 36 (2011); doi: 10.1038/475036a. Daniel Simberloff University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. dsimberloff@utk.edu Jake Alexander Institute of Integrative Biology, Zurich, Switzerland. Fred Allendorf Univ...
Conference Paper
The eastern Pacific burrowing mud shrimp Upogebia pugettensis was an abundant species that dominated the biogeochemistry of intertidal estuary mudflats; however, their populations have declined dramatically since the late 1990s following the introduction of the bopyrid isopod parasite Orthione griffenis. Weight losses of Upogebia infested by Orthio...
Article
Full-text available
The introduced Asian parasitic bopyrid isopod, Orthione griffenis, was first discovered on the Pacific coast of North America in Washington in 1988 and next in California in 1992. The range of Orthione presently extends from British Columbia to Baja California, where it infests at least two species of the native estuary mud shrimp, Upogebia. Intens...
Article
Full-text available
A dramatic increase in prevalence of the recently discovered bopyrid isopod parasite, Orthione griffenis, likely introduced in the 1980s from Asia to the Pacific coast of North America, coincided with the 2002 collapse of a population of its burrowing mud shrimp host, Upogebia pugettensis, in Willapa Bay, Washington that had been stable since monit...
Article
The population structure and energetic burden of bopyrid isopod parasite Orthione griffenis on the eastern Pacific mud shrimp Upogebia pugettensis are estimated from size and weight relationships between parasite and host. U. pugettensis weight loss increases with O. griffenis weight but the high variance in the relation indicates that direct weigh...
Article
Full-text available
Estuaries play an important role as nurseries and migration corridors for Chinook salmon and other fishes. The invasive New Zealand mudsnail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843), has been noted in the Columbia River Estuary and other estuaries in the western USA, yet no studies have addressed the estuarine impacts of this invader. Our data show P...
Article
Full-text available
The European periwinkle snail, Littorina littorea was discovered in Pictou, NS, Canada in 1840. This snail’s subsequent rapid, conspicuous spread south from Pictou along the Canadian maritime coast and then along the New England and mid-Atlantic coast to New Jersey, its virtual absence in pre-European contact deposits, and its close association wit...
Article
Full-text available
Two centuries of historical, archaeological, paleontological, geological, oceanographical and biological data conclusively indicate that the periwinkle snail Littorina littorea was introduced to North America from Europe either by Norse explorers 1000 years ago or by European colonists after 1840. Available genetic data do not indicate ancient dive...
Article
Full-text available
In recent decades, the world has witnessed an array of harmful invasions by exotic marine organisms. To provide the public and policymakers with better information on the status of exotic species in southern California waters, and to assess differences between port and non-port areas, a Rapid Assessment Survey of selected habitat types in sheltered...
Article
Full-text available
A global market in seafood disperses many live organisms to distant locations. These organisms can be released into environments of the new locations, where they can establish reproductive populations. The risks of such introductions remain poorly resolved. We therefore surveyed bivalves (oysters, mussels, and clams) that are commercially available...
Article
Full-text available
The non-indigenous Latemula (Exolaternula) marilina (Reeve, 1860) (Bivalvia: Laternulidae) has been redis­ covered in the northeast Pacific in Humboldt Bay, Cali­ fornia (40 0 49'N, 124°14'W). The first and only previous records of this species from the northeast Pacific are from Coos Bay, Oregon (43°25'N, 124°2TW) where two spec­ imens were recove...
Article
The antibiotics penicillin-G and streptomycin sulfate, commonly used to grow axenic cultures of diatoms, consistently reduce mortalities in experiments using laboratory cultures of the gammaridean amphipod Corophium spinicorne. These antibiotics do not change average weight-specific growth rates of the test organisms. Applications of antibiotics ca...
Article
A theory that introduced species can be identified from their evolutionary, ecological, and geographical attributes (criteria for introduced species) is corroborated by the accuracy of its predictions. A human-borne, global invasion of the Oriental isopod Synidotea laevidorsalis (Miers, 1881) that began over 100 years ago was discovered in a test o...
Article
Full-text available
Global increases in ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR) have the potential to alter marine primary production and to affect carbon cycles and marine trophic dynamics. Estimates of UVBR induced photoinhibition have varied greatly, indicating that a common dose-response by marine phytoplankton may not occur from place to place. An action spectrum describi...
Article
Criteria for distinguishing introduced from endemic peracaridan crustaceans were used to deduce that a human-borne global invasion by the Oriental isopod Synidotea laevidorsalis (Miers, 1881) has occurred in the past 100 years. These criteria concern the ecological, evoluntionary, and geographical attributes of introduced species. The criteria were...
Article
ABSTRACT Northeast Pacific estuaries may be severely altered by a broad diversity of accidentally introduced exotic invertebrates (Carlton, 1979a, b, 1987), but few detailed analyses of individual species have been made. The gammaridean amphipods Ampelisca abdita, Melita nitida, Corophium alienense, new species, and Parapleustes derzhavini have pre...

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