John M. Chaney Regents Professor - Oklahoma State

John M. Chaney Regents Professor - Oklahoma State
Oklahoma State University - Stillwater | Oklahoma State · Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology, University of Missouri

About

156
Publications
25,173
Reads
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3,111
Citations
Introduction
John M. Chaney, PhD, is a Regents Professor of Psychology at Oklahoma State University - Stillwater. John's primary research focus is in Pediatric Psychology, particularly youth with chronic inflammatory diseases. He and his lab are currently working on a number of studies examining disease parameters, illness appraisals, and psychosocial adjustment in youth with IBD and their parents.
Additional affiliations
August 1991 - present
August 1985 - July 1991
University of Missouri
Education
August 1985 - July 1991
University of Missouri
Field of study
  • Clinical Psychology

Publications

Publications (156)
Article
Full-text available
To examine the role of children's illness-related cognitive appraisals in the parent-child adjustment relationship in a sample of children and adolescents with juvenile rheumatic disease (JRD). Specifically, we tested the moderating effect of children's perceived illness-induced barriers (i.e., illness intrusiveness) in the parent distress-child de...
Article
Full-text available
Utilized both interview and self-report methods to examine transactional patterns of child, mother, and father adjustment in a sample of children and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Overall, levels of child and parental adjustment were relatively stable over the 1-year study period. Regression analyses revealed that inc...
Article
Full-text available
Background Studies have begun to identify psychosocial factors associated with depressive symptoms in youth with IBD. However, despite considerable speculation in the literature regarding the role of perceived stigma in both social and emotional adjustment outcomes, youth appraisals of stigma have yet to receive empirical attention. The primary pur...
Article
Objective Youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often experience difficulties communicating about their disease. It is suspected that the stigmatizing nature of IBD symptoms contributes to youths’ health communication difficulties, leaving youth feeling disconnected from their social environment and potentially resulting in decreased social b...
Article
Objective: The objective of this study is to examine parent and youth appraisals of illness uncertainty as potential serial mediators in the relation between disease severity and youth depressive symptoms in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: Participants were 85 adolescents 13-18 years of age (Mage = 15.75, SD =1.51) wi...
Article
Background: Elevated depressive symptoms are observed in a significant number of youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and have been linked to illness stigma and social isolation. Body image dissatisfaction is an understudied variable in the pediatric IBD literature that may be related to both stigma and social difficulties. It is suspected...
Article
Introduction Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with a chronic medical condition (CMC) attending college must learn to manage their own healthcare (i.e., transition readiness). Maturity has been linked to positive outcomes in AYAs. Research has established a positive relationship between transition readiness and quality of life. The current study a...
Article
Full-text available
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presents physical and emotional challenges for families and imposes significant lifestyle intrusions on both youth and parents. The present study examined the effects of IBD disease activity and youth illness intrusiveness on depressive symptoms in adolescents, and the moderating influence of parent illness intrusiv...
Article
Purpose Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) management creates significant caregiver demands that can interfere with parents' ability to engage in a number of role functions (i.e., illness intrusiveness) well into their child's adolescence, potentially resulting in excessive or misdirected parenting (i.e., overparenting). Disruptions and limited acces...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Adolescents and young adults in the college setting often report poor sleep hygiene and quality. These sleep difficulties may be related to emotion dysregulation, which is highly relevant to broader adjustment. The current study aimed to empirically identify latent groups of healthy college students with distinct subjective sleep patterns...
Article
Objective The current study examined the roles of constructive and dysfunctional problem-solving strategies in the relationships between illness uncertainty and adjustment outcomes (i.e., anxious, depressive, and posttraumatic stress symptoms) in caregivers of children newly diagnosed with cancer. Methods Two hundred thirty-eight caregivers of chi...
Article
Objective: Symptom burden of children with cancer appears to contribute to parent distress, but the mechanisms of this relationship are relatively unexplored. The current cross-sectional study examined rumination (i.e., repeated focus on negative events and experiences) as a mediator of the associations between parent-report of child (a) pain or (b...
Article
Objective: To examine the relative contribution of transition readiness (i.e., healthcare self-management) to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among emerging adult (EA) college students without a chronic medical condition (CMC).Participants: College students (n = 2372; Mage = 19.32, SD = 1.26) from a Midwestern university.Methods: Participan...
Article
Purpose The stigmatizing nature of IBD symptoms may place youth at risk for being targets of peer victimization, potentially resulting in a decreased sense of social belongingness and poorer emotional adjustment. The present study tested a series of mediation and moderated mediation models examining the associations among peer victimization, thwart...
Article
Purpose The transition to college is associated with numerous stressors, including environmental changes, increased academic expectations, and changes in social support, all of which may be exacerbated by the added responsibility of managing a chronic medical condition. Huang (2019) proposed a model examining the relationships between coping styles...
Article
Introduction Pediatric brain tumor survivors (PBTS) are at risk for both neurocognitive impairments and psychological difficulties, yet these two domains have historically been discretely examined, with assessment of psychosocial outcomes rarely included in studies of cognitive outcomes. Taking a person‐centered approach, the current study aimed to...
Article
Objective To identify possible subgroups of health care utilization (HCU) patterns among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with a chronic medical condition (CMC), and examine how these patterns relate to transition readiness and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods Undergraduates (N = 359; Mage=19.51 years, SD = 1.31) with a self-repor...
Article
Objective Examine the indirect association between parents’ experience of stigma (i.e., associative stigma) and youth depressive symptoms through the serial effects of associative stigma on parent and youth illness intrusiveness in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods During routine clinic visits, 150 youth with well-controlled IBD (...
Article
Background: Youth who experience IBD-associated stigma may manifest increased worry about aversive symptoms that can intrude on their participation in routine activities (e.g., school, social events), potentially resulting in limited opportunities for reinforcement and increased depressive symptoms. The present study examined an IBD stigma → IBD w...
Article
Full-text available
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are known to contribute to long-term harmful effects on mental health in young adults. Research has demonstrated that having a chronic medical condition (CMC) can also be conceptualized as being a potentially traumatic experience, and that young adults with a CMC are also at risk for negative adjustment. Emotion...
Article
Full-text available
Background Pediatric brain tumor survivors (PBTS) are at significant risk for psychological adjustment difficulties, including greater depressive and anxious symptomology. Systematic reviews have identified this heightened risk among youth with medical conditions, but these reviews have not been specific to PBTS. Therefore, the current study aimed...
Article
Acceptance-based behavioral therapies for obesity (ABTs) may be superior to standard behavioral therapies but have not been adequately tested with American Indians (AIs). Neurocognitive function is also unexamined in relation to behavioral weight loss among AIs despite findings that neurocognition predicts outcomes in general samples, may help expl...
Poster
Introduction Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves invasive symptoms and embarrassing treatment side effects (e.g., weight gain/loss). Elevated levels of depressive symptoms are also observed in youth with IBD, and have been linked to perceived illness stigma and feelings of social isolation. One potential variable related to stigma that has re...
Article
Full-text available
Perceived illness stigma is associated with increased depressive symptoms in youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the mechanisms by which stigma influences emotional adjustment remain unclear. It is possible that youth with IBD who are more present-focused and better able to come to terms with aspects of their disease that are less cont...
Article
Full-text available
Youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and their parents are at increased risk for psychological adjustment difficulties, potentially due to the uncertain and intrusive nature of IBD. However, empirical investigations have yet to assess the contribution of these unique disease features to adjustment outcomes. Our aim was to examine: 1) the inf...
Article
Objective: The current study evaluated perceived barriers to care for parents of children with cancer and the mediating effect of illness uncertainty (IU; uncertainty from the ambiguity or unpredictability of the illness) on the relationship between barriers and parental psychological distress. We hypothesized that greater barriers to care would b...
Article
Native Americans (NAs) have a higher prevalence of chronic pain than other U.S. racial/ethnic groups, but there have been few attempts to understand the mechanisms of this pain disparity. This study used a comprehensive battery of laboratory tasks to assess peripheral fiber function (cool/warm detection thresholds), pain sensitivity (eg, thresholds...
Article
Full-text available
Parents of children with disorders of sex development (DSD) report significant psychological distress, including posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), with mothers consistently reporting higher rates of psychological distress than fathers. However, psychological factors contributing to PTSS in both parents are not well understood. The present study...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Parents and children affected by pediatric cancer are at risk for psychological distress, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress. A link is believed to exist between parent and child distress; however, no systematic analysis of this relationship has occurred. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the relationship bet...
Article
Purpose: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with chronic medical conditions are at risk for reduced health- related quality of life (HRQoL). Recent research on AYAs without chronic medical conditions found that greater health care management skills were related to higher HRQoL. In addition, grit, an intrapersonal strength, has been linked to great...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Adolescents/Young Adults (AYAs) with a chronic illness display elevated risk for poor psychosocial outcomes, yet relatively little is known about factors that place these individuals at risk. Illness intrusiveness is a known predictor of negative psychosocial outcomes in AYAs. Illness-related stigma, an understudied concept in this popu...
Article
Background/Aims: Parents of children born with a disorder of sex development (DSD) often experience anxiety, but risk factors, including parental perception of the severity of their child’s DSD, have not been examined. We hypothesized that severity of illness (SOI) ratings would relate to parental anxiety, and would be higher for parents of childre...
Article
Objective: To examine the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their relationship with psychological distress among adolescents/young adults (AYAs) with and without pediatric chronic medical conditions (CMC). Methods: A matched sample of AYAs with and without a CMC (n = 484, Mage = 19.48, 77.7% female) completed online measures of...
Article
Objective: Caregivers of pediatric cancer patients are at risk for posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Previous literature has identified caregiver illness uncertainty as a predictor of PTSS, yet little is known about the mechanism by which illness uncertainty may affect PTSS. Rumination, or perseverations about the cause and consequences of an...
Article
Objective: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with chronic medical conditions are at increased risk for a host of negative psychosocial outcomes, including depressive and anxious symptoms. Although studies have shown that illness appraisals (e.g., illness intrusiveness [II] and illness uncertainty [IU]) demonstrate consistent associations with su...
Article
Objective: This preliminary study compared a DSM-IV-TR screening tool for posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) with a modified DSM-5 version for parents of children diagnosed with cancer. Methods: Caregivers (n = 101) completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). Five BSI items were added to the IES-R to ass...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined the impact of asthma-specific thought intrusion (TI) and thought suppression (TS) on two cognitive-affective variables (self-focused attention and fear of negative evaluation) among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) diagnosed with childhood-onset asthma. Participants were 290 AYAs who completed assessment questionnaires...
Article
Objective : To examine the relationship of grit, an intrapersonal characteristic defined by perseverance and passion for long-term goals, to health care management skills and adolescent and young adult (AYA) health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Higher levels of grit were expected to relate to greater health care management skills and HRQoL, and...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To examine predictors of psychological functioning in college students with chronic illnesses. Participants: Participants (N = 1413) included 364 students with self-reported diagnoses of asthma or allergies, 148 students with other chronic illnesses (e.g., epilepsy, type 1 diabetes), and 901 healthy students. Data were collected between...
Article
The current study examined the relationship between demographic variables, treatment factors, and perceived barriers-to-care to both caregiver distress and caregiver reported child health related quality of life in caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer utilizing path analysis. Parental distress is examined as a potential mediator between bar...
Article
Full-text available
To examine illness intrusiveness and parenting stress as potential serial mediators in the relationship between parents’ illness-specific caregiver demand and psychological distress in parents of youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRDs). Sixty-eight caregivers of youth diagnosed with a JRD completed measures of illness-specific caregiver deman...
Article
Full-text available
Psychosocial distress is a salient construct experienced by families of children with newly diagnosed cancer, but little is known about parental appraisal of the child's illness and the subsequent impact this may have on child and parent functioning. The goal of the present study was to examine the interrelationships among multiple parent illness a...
Article
Objective: The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature utilizing the Child Attitude Toward Illness Scale (CATIS) as a measure of illness attitudes within pediatric chronic illness, including epilepsy, and provide recommendations for its use. This review includes an examination of the psychometric properties of the CATIS...
Article
Objective: Examine caregiver demand and general parent distress as mediators in the parent illness uncertainty-child depressive symptom association in youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases. METHODS: Children and adolescents completed the Child Depression Inventory; caregivers completed the Parent Perceptions of Uncertainty Scale, the Care for My...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To investigate the relationship of illness uncertainty (IU) to global psychological distress (GPD) and posttraumatic stress symptomatology (PTSS) using a path analysis approach. Methods: Participants were 105 caregivers (MAge = 36.9 years, standard deviation [SD] = 8.7) of children (MAge = 8.6 years, SD = 5.0) with newly diagnosed can...
Article
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To examine the relationships between self-efficacy (SE) and social support (SS) for physical activity (PA), weekly moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA), and depression and anxiety in young adults (YAs) with asthma and allergies. Methods: Participants were 611 YAs (age M = 19.56 ± 3.28). YAs completed measures of SE for PA, SS for PA, depression, anxiety,...
Article
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The current study investigated the mediating role of fear of negative evaluation on the relationship between self-focused attention and self-esteem among college students with and without asthma. Young adults with (N = 148) and without (N = 530) childhood-onset asthma were recruited from a college student population. Self-focused attention and fear...
Article
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The hope of mediation modeling is that psychologists can go beyond tests of association to truly uncover mechanisms of change. We argue this hope can be realized only if psychologists make important distinctions regarding causality and inference. From the perspective of Aristotelian philosophy, mediation models are sequences of efficient causes, an...
Article
Research regarding family adaption and resilience in children with chronic health conditions has resulted in the development of a number of theoretical models and data-driven psychosocial interventions in the field of pedi-atric psychology, some of which may not be well known in the field of family science. These models incorporate family systems t...
Article
Full-text available
The role of illness intrusiveness in the barriers to care -> depressive symptom association in youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRDs) was examined. Sixty-six youth completed the Child Depression Inventory and the Illness Intrusiveness Scale-Child; parents completed the Barriers to Care Questionnaire and the Illness Intrusiveness Scale-Parent...
Article
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Parent and family interventions have a long, demonstrated history of utilization in pediatric psychology settings. The current article will first briefly overview and describe the predominant parent and family intervention approaches used in pediatric psychology, including traditional family therapy approaches, cognitive– behavioral family therapy,...
Article
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Objective: The current study examined the relationship between sleep quality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Participants: Participants were 501 undergraduate students with allergies (167), asthma + allergies (167), or with no history of a chronic illness (167) completed study measures from August 2011 to April 2012. Methods: The u...
Article
Full-text available
Studies demonstrate a link between parental distress, youth illness appraisals, and depression symptoms in youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases. However, the exclusive use of broadband (i.e. general) measures of parental distress in these studies has resulted in conceptual and clinical imprecision regarding the parent-child adjustment process. Ou...
Data
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The objective of this article is to investigate how parenting capacities and child outcomes vary across different indexes of socioeconomic status (SES; e.g., composite vs. single dimension) in a sample of families of children with pediatric cancer. Parents provided demographic information for the Hollingshead Index of Social Position, the Parent Pr...
Article
Full-text available
To test whether children's pessimistic causal attributions mediate the parent distress–child depressive symptom relation in youth diagnosed with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRDs) and their parents. Fifty-two youth completed the Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire and the Children's Depression Inventory; parents completed the Brief Symptom...
Article
Full-text available
Parents of youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRD) often take on illness management responsibilities that can become burdensome, potentially resulting in poor parent adjustment outcomes. However, not all caregivers will experience increased distress as a result of variability in stress appraisals. The current study examined the role of parent...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of the current study was to examine the prospective relation between illness attitudes and depressive symptoms in a sample of youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRDs). Thirty children with JRDs completed the Child Attitude Toward Illness Scale (CATIS) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) on two occasions, approximately 1 year...