Johannes M. Luetz

Johannes M. Luetz
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · School of Social Sciences

Ph.D. (UNSW)
Interdisciplinary research on sustainable development and education at the science-faith and science-policy interface

About

71
Publications
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Introduction
Johannes M. Luetz (BA/USA, MBA/Germany, PhD/Australia) is a social scientist and senior researcher based in Brisbane, Australia. He has consulted for World Vision and has lived and worked across countries and continents. He is a global citizen and has interdisciplinary research interests at the science-faith science-policy interface. He is Deputy Editor Emerald Q1 Journal IJCCSM and has adjunct appointments at University of New South Wales and University of Sunshine Coast.

Publications

Publications (71)
Chapter
Atoll island communities are naturally vulnerable to flooding hazards such as king tides, storm surges and overtopping, among others. Climate change can be expected to catalyse the susceptibility to flooding through extreme weather events, sea level rise (SLR) and other climate related pressures. Further, population growth in coastal proximity can...
Chapter
This entry scrutinizes approaches to research, knowledge creation, and education through the prism of “disciplinarity” and “interdisciplinarity.” The discourse also explores alternative and competing conceptual approaches, terminology, and typology, including “multidisciplinarity,” “systems theory,” “multiliteracies,” and “anti-disciplinarity.” Whi...
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Background Climate change is a problem which is global in nature, and whose effects go across a wide range of disciplines. It is therefore important that this theme is taken into account as part of universities´ teaching and research programs. Methods A three-tiered approach was used, consisting of a bibliometric analysis, an online survey and a s...
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Climate change negatively impacts the livelihoods of indigenous communities across the world, including those located on the African continent. This Comment reports on how five African indigenous communities have been impacted by climate change and the adopted adaptation mechanisms.
Chapter
Achieving global environmental sustainability is a current issue, and one of profound importance for the future of humanity. However, environmental sustainability cannot be meaningfully discussed as an issue in isolation, for it is deeply intertwined with other social justice issues such as education, spirituality and—by extension—humanity’s collec...
Article
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is believed to have a significant potential use in tackling climate change. This paper explores the connections between AI and climate change research as a whole and its usefulness in climate change adaptation efforts in particular. Using a systematic review of the literature on applications of AI for climate change ada...
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Bangladesh has a unique coastal system with both proximity of climatic vulnerability and opportunity, having rich coastal resources. The upkeep of people's livelihoods in the coastal zone largely depends on the degree to which key stakeholders at all levels of decision-making can participate in climate adaptation planning and implementation process...
Article
Background and objectives Recent years have seen a surge of articles related to compulsive pornography consumption or pornography addiction, with experts warning of potentially detrimental consequences. Whereas much research has focused on the male consumers of pornography, fewer studies have examined the impacts of pornography-linked compulsive se...
Article
This chapter focuses on mainland coastal towns that have populations of between 10,000 and 50,000 inhabitants. Through six case studies, the chapter develops an understanding of the characteristics that shape each of the communities. By exploring the climate change hazards each of the case studies are experiencing now and forecast into the future,...
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Full-text available
Over recent years, globalisation occasioned a dramatic rise in cross-cultural interactions until this was disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The ability to competently engage in a multicultural world is often considered the “literacy of the future”. Global interconnectedness has brought studies into intercultural competence to centre stage. This h...
Preprint
Over recent years globalisation has occasioned a dramatic rise in cross-cultural interactions – until this was disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic (OECD 2018, Nelson & Luetz 2021). The ability to competently engage in a multicultural world is often considered the “literacy of the future” (UNESCO 2013, OECD 2018). Global interconnectedness has brough...
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Full-text available
Since January 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has dominated the media and exercises pressure on governments worldwide. Apart from its effects on economies, education systems and societies, the pandemic has also influenced climate change research. This paper examines the extent to which COVID-19 has influenced climate change research worldwide during th...
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Small Island States (SIDS) are among the nations most exposed to climate change (CC) and are characterised by a high degree of vulnerability. Their unique nature means there is a need for more studies focused on the limits to CC adaptation on such fragile nations, particularly regarding their problems and constraints. This paper addressed a perceiv...
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Countries in the majority world are widely argued to be most severely affected by the corona pandemic. To fight the outbreak of the virus and reduce risks of economic hardships and starvation these countries need an ability to innovate and quickly develop feasible solutions in areas such as health, education, and business. In response to this crisi...
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This pilot study critically reviews the implementation of World Vision’s Early Warning Early Action System (EWEAS) after 18 months of field testing in 13 countries in the East and Southern Africa region following the 2011 Horn of Africa (HoA) food crisis. It makes a critical contribution to our understanding of the need for better disaster predicti...
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Many environmental problems can be attributed to human behaviour, and education is seen as a means of shaping human behaviour that is pro-environmental. The role of the formal education system in supporting pro-environmental behaviour is considered pivotal and duly highlighted in key documents/plans on sustainable development. This chapter is based...
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Ecotheology is an area of growing interest to faith communities both denominationally and ecumenically. This includes Pacific Island nations, which are characterised by a comparatively high degree of Christianisation. Ecotheological ideas commonly explore the interrelationships between religion and nature in the light of contemporary environmental...
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Armed conflict has been part of the human experience for all recorded history, and together with peoples and cultures, the environment has been a major casualty of this. The causes and costs of war are numerous, complex and invariably expensive, leaving a toll that is measured not only in financial terms, but also in terms of the impact on the natu...
Book
This interdisciplinary book explores the science and spirituality nexus in the Pacific Islands Region and as such makes a critical contribution to sustainable climate change adaptation in Oceania. In addition to presenting case studies, literary analyses, field projects, and empirical research, the book describes faith-engaged approaches through th...
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Given that almost every Pacific Island resident is spiritually engaged to a degree that is uncommon in western secular societies, an evaluation of the role of religion in climate-change adaptation in this exposed region is overdue. This chapter explains the nature of Pacific Island people’s religious engagement, its undoubted links with culturally-...
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Sexual addiction (SA) and hypersexual disorder (HD) describe prevalent contemporary phenomena that the public remains poorly educated about. Notwithstanding widespread agreement among concerned stakeholders that SA and HD constitute an understudied and underappreciated challenge, the analysis digested in this research converges around the synthesis...
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The biblical books of Acts (12:1; 12:5), Matthew (11:12) and Romans (16:7) all speak of the apostles Peter, Paul and John interacting in prison discipleship with other followers of Christ. These references are the first documentation of New Testament prison chaplaincy, and the Gospel of Matthew (25:36) goes even further, admonishing Christians to b...
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Owing to the expansion of globalisation, cultural interactions have brought studies into Intercultural Competence (IC) to centre stage (UNDP 2004; Bissessar 2018; Nelson et al. 2019). According to leading scholars and organisations, educational institutions have a vital role to play in helping their students develop the necessary knowledge, skills...
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Research in Christian education is in its infancy and there is limited published work of a good standard to consult. In order for Christian education research to mature, educators need examples of conceptual, empirical and practice-based research modelled from different disciplinary standpoints and within formal and informal educational settings. T...
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Throughout the history of the Church, those who have devoted their attention to formulating a theology of the Christian faith have concentrated primarily—indeed almost exclusively—on the relationship between God and humanity, with scant attention paid to the place of the natural world in the economy of God. This oversight is remarkable in light of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Small Island States (SIDS) are among the nations most exposed to climate change (CC) and are characterised by a high degree of vulnerability. Their special nature means there is a need for more studies focused on the limits to CC adaptation on such fragile nations, particularly in respect of their problems and constraints. This paper addressed a pe...
Book
This book reformulates Christian education as an interdisciplinary and interdenominational vocation for professionals and practitioners. It speaks directly to a range of contemporary contexts with the aim of encouraging conceptual, empirical and practice-informed innovation to build the field of Christian education research. The book invites reader...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Pacific Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have health care systems with a limited capacity to deal with pandemics, making them especially vulnerable to the economic and social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19). This paper examines the introduction, transmission, and incidence of COVID-19 into Pacific SIDS. Methods: Calculate...
Article
Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are known to be particularly vulnerable to climate change, which poses a challenge to their economic and social development. This vulnerability is expressed in several ways, from exposure to sea level rises, to salt intrusion, and extensive droughts in some areas. Despite this rather negative trend, there are e...
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In the Pacific, the capacity of curriculum writers for integrating the content of climate change into their curricula and/or taught Resilience [Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) & Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR)] in education is limited. This paper described the findings of a 2018 study on the integration of climate change into primary and secondary sc...
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The Pacific Islands region is highlighted in the literature as one of the most vulnerable geographic areas in the world, with a high priority for adaptation to climate change. In consequence, many interventions have been proposed and implemented over the years that approach environmental sustainability and adaptation to climate change in the Pacifi...
Article
Globalization has contributed to unprecedented migration of people across countries and continents. With critique on some previous models on migrant acculturation, this research discusses transnationalism as an alternative lens through which to view transnational migrants. The research focussed on the experiences of South Africans who have migrated...
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Climate change-related human migration is an area of growing interest and policy concern. Although climate change is not easily isolated as the predominant cause of human movement, it is increasingly impossible to dismiss its role as a key contributing migration push factor. Moreover, there is agreement among experts that its contribution to migrat...
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This entry investigates the role of disaster-resistant schools for the promotion of disaster-resilient education and disaster-prepared students. According to Mutch (2014), “[t]here is very little in the disaster literature about the part schools have played or could play in a co-ordinated way in wider disaster preparedness, response and recovery” (...
Book
Climate change is one of the major challenges of modern times. Its impacts are manifold and vary from sea level rise (especially relevant to those living in coastal areas), to the increased frequency of extreme events such as cyclones and storm surges, which not only poses problems to property and infrastructure, but also to human health. Climate c...
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The science of human behavior change is a complex field of investigation (Young 2017). On the one hand, there are those who promote the idea that education alone is sufficient to instigate behavior change. According to this view, all that educators need to do is to educate people with sound science about the physical causes of environmental degrada...
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Full-text available
The situation of the Carteret Islanders, often characterised as the first ‘climate change refugees’, has attracted much research interest. What is the impact of such interest? And are standard ethics compliance processes appropriate? Open Access: https://www.fmreview.org/sites/fmr/files/FMRdownloads/en/ethics/luetz.pdf
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Climate change-related human movement typically occurs within a complex web of commingled contributory causative factors. Hence the multicausality inherent in human movement makes attribution or disaggregation of causality an almost intractable problem. Nevertheless, climate change is now widely recognized as a key contributing migration push facto...
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Definition: Climate change-related human migration is an area of growing interest and policy concern. Although climate change is not easily isolated as the predominant cause of human movement, it is increasingly impossible to dismiss its role as a key contributing migration push factor. Moreover, there is agreement among experts that its contributi...
Chapter
Leading and sustaining change efforts is widely recognised as an important success factor for achieving progress on matters pertaining to environmental sustainability. There are several reasons for this. For example, transitioning from a fossil fuel based global economy to one that is based on renewable energy is a challenge that is widely understo...
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In many countries of the world the dream of achieving education, free and compulsory for all, remains elusive for large parts of the population. Bangladesh is a case in point. Drawing on field research conducted in Bangladesh in 2008, 2011 and 2012, including in conjunction with the international development organisation World Vision, this chapter...
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Community gardening (CG) has been the subject of growing interest, both within and without the realm of academia. The reasons for this increase in interest are straightforward, given that CG typically offers benefits in at least three areas: (1) fostering a sense of community among contributing stakeholders; (2) promoting a sense of social responsi...
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Social responsibility (SR) and sustainable development (SD) are dissimilar yet complementary concepts. Over recent decades their increase in popularity has seen the two terms become firmly integrated within international development policy discourse. Nevertheless, even though both terms are intertwined and cannot be meaningfully discussed in isolat...
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Social responsibility and sustainable development are concepts of growing interest to the corporate sector, including in the so-called developing world. Although the benefits are manifold and typically include mutual learning, innovation, humanitarian engagement, intercultural exchange, new markets, and effective theory-praxis integration that is a...
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Education for environmental sustainability is increasingly highlighted as an important success factor for environmentally conscious and conscientious living, including the advancement of global poverty reduction and the attainment of developmental goals such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As such, education can be comprehended as a de...
Book
This book is an arresting interdisciplinary publication on Christian education, comprising works by leading scholars, professionals and practitioners from around the globe. It focuses on the integrated approaches to Christian education that are both theoretically sound and practically beneficial, and identifies innovative pedagogical methods and to...
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Full-text available
This chapter introduces the reader to the notion of learning and loves in relation to Christian education. In particular, it draws from James K. A. Smith’s (2016a) keynote address at the 2016 research symposium “Learning and Loves: Reimagining Christian Education” and sketches a range of contemporary perspectives on the nature and purpose of Christ...
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South Asia is one of the most densely settled and disaster-prone regions in the world. Furthermore, in many low-lying coastal contexts both slow-onset and rapid-onset natural disasters coalesce with existent conditions of poverty and vulnerability to progressively erode and compromise human adaptive capacity, resulting in a persistent flux of livel...
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Full-text available
Climate change is a significant threat to health and well-being, in particular to people’s spiritual well-being, in coastal areas and communities. This paper describes the findings of a 2013 study on impacts of climate change on people’s spiritual well-being in 5 coastal communities in Tongatapu, Tonga: Kanokupolu, ‘Ahau, Tukutonga, Popua and Manuk...
Chapter
Education and environmental sustainability are issues of great importance. Both are intertwined and cannot be meaningfully discussed in isolation. Nevertheless, it is education that serves the cause towards environmental sustainability. This would suggest that education in itself is incomplete if it fails to firmly integrate environmental sustainab...
Chapter
In many small island contexts natural disasters and environmental change can combine to overwhelm communal coping capacities, at times triggering ad hoc human migration responses which can be lacking in anticipatory foresight, relevant preparedness, community coordination, and needed funding support. In the foreseeable future on-going urbanisation...
Thesis
High levels of human mobility brought on by global megatrends such as population growth, urbanisation, globalisation, coastward migration, environmental degradation, resource depletion, and sprawling of slums in developing countries are likely to be reinforced by climate change, making it plausible that human mobility will increase significantly du...
Book
Full-text available
Disaster Preparedness: The word “disaster” is derived from the Greek pejorative prefix “dis-” (bad) and “aster” (star). According to the Oxford Dictionary, the word’s root in astrology literally denotes an “ill-starred” event. For many centuries people believed that a catastrophic event resulted under a “bad star” – a dis-aster. But while natural d...

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Projects (3)
Project
Complete call for papers also at Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology: https://fore.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/CFP_Interfaith_Research_Education_Practice.pdf CALL FOR PAPERS This Call for Papers invites expressions of interest to contribute to the new book Interfaith Research, Education, and Practice: Beyond the Divide, to be published by Springer Nature, one of the global Top-Five academic publishers. As a fully peer-reviewed and indexed publication each book chapter will receive a unique DOI and thus be individually accessible online. This will facilitate widespread global accessibility of all accepted chapters and will be conducive to visibility and citations. Please note below how to submit your expression of interest to contribute to the new book, which will be edited by Dr Johannes M. Luetz, School of Law and Society, University of the Sunshine Coast; Rev Professor Denise A. Austin, Deputy Vice President Research and Standards, Alphacrucis College; and Dr Adis Duderija, Centre for Social and Cultural Research, Griffith University. BACKGROUND Human experience of past and present inter-religious discord reflects a long and harrowing list of disturbing consequences that reverberate across time and space. These include discrimination, bigotry, prejudice, persecution, injustice, hatred, and segregation, along with numberless open and concealed conflicts. Resultant isolationism, ignorance, extremism and entrenched religious divisiveness have long undermined both interpersonal relationships and international cooperations. Many consequences are beyond description, and the cumulative opportunity costs are beyond measure. It is against this background that this book aims to create space ‘beyond the divide’. It seeks to redress distortions of religious mis- and dis-information and aims to construct inter-religious common ground. Importantly, many global challenges facing humanity today can only be mastered if humans from diverse religious backgrounds and faith traditions can meaningfully collaborate in support of human rights, reconciliation, sustainability, justice, and peace. This entails the unequivocal duty to honour and respect indigenous spirituality en route to imagining and creating a world that may be equitably and enduringly shared. This context makes the purposive exploration of opportunities for interfaith research and practice in the 21st century a fertile and promising undertaking. INVITATION TO CONTRIBUTE Set against this background we invite suitably qualified experts and project teams to contribute to the edited volume Interfaith Research, Education, and Practice: Beyond the Divide. This interdisciplinary book explores spirituality across faiths and cultures to better understand diverse religious backgrounds. It will foster inter-religious understanding and collaborative endeavours for peace, education, academic networking, and community development. A unique feature of this book is its strong theory-practice focus. Apart from the results of research and field projects, it will contain a range of papers exemplifying the diversity of approaches to interfaith research and practice taking place all over the world. To this end the book invites the documentation of grassroots projects and innovative initiatives in Africa, Middle East, Europe, the Americas, and the wider Asia Pacific region, thus showcasing and promoting the diversity of works taking place today. The appraisal of present and future challenges and opportunities, framed within a context of public policy and praxis, makes this interdisciplinary publication a profitable tool for teaching, research, and policy analysis and development. ENVISAGED CHAPTER TOPICS Topics include (but are not limited to) the following big-picture themes, the scope of which may overlap: • Philosophical, theological, hermeneutical, and dialogical engagements beyond and across religious divides and cultural institutions • Exploratory discourses that chart challenges, opportunities, and future prospects for interfaith spirituality • Integrated discourses that bridge the science-spirituality divide and create consilience by conjoining contributions from the sciences and humanities • Conceptual frameworks such as tolerance or hospitality that accept difference (‘agreeing to disagree agreeably’) or aim to bestow blessing and generosity through relationship (‘loving and welcoming the stranger’) • Engaging multipolarity via multinational, multicultural, multilingual and/or multiethnic organisations and communities • Interfaith ideation and opportunities to promote human rights, reconciliation, sustainability, justice, and peace • Leveraging inter- and multi-religious capacity to tackle global challenges (e.g., climate emergency, species extinction, ideological extremism, non-renewable resource depletion, and entrenched global poverty, among others) • Analyses how positionality affects insider-outsider discourses or so-called ‘othering’ • Theoretical research on Scripture-shaped religious convictions on ecotheology, ‘creation care’ and ecological hermeneutics • Empirical research, case studies and grassroots examples of innovative local and translocal inter-religious practices • Integrated approaches to interfaith collaboration that are field-tested and practice-approved • Replicable examples of good or best practice cases that may be scaled • Interfaith research in different demographic and educational contexts (e.g., primary, secondary, tertiary education; rural, urban, peri-urban populations, etc.) • Inter-religious collaboration in the context of human migration, displacement, and refugee contexts • Holy Books and arising opportunities and challenges for inter-religious harmonious co-existence and practices • Incentivising and implementing strategies to address or redress extremist ideation • Disciplinary, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary approaches • Disasters and divine attribution: Exploring epistemological and hermeneutical perspectives on ‘end time prophecy’ and eschatology • Using technology to disseminate information, form coalitions and/or build social movements • Capacity building: Multi-faith coalitions, alliances, and participatory approaches • Employing inter-religious research, education and leadership for policy development and regulatory change • Documented examples of new inter- and parareligious movements emerging from long established religious traditions • Public policy at the intersection of secular democratic, sociocratic and/or theocratic worldview orientations • Interfaith practice and Indigenous perspectives on place, culture, language, worldview, and identity • Interfaith engagement in the context of missions, witnessing, and faith-based community development • Nurturing and preserving Indigenous spiritual beliefs, even when these have acquiesced to introduced religious traditions • Barriers and limits to interfaith research and practice • Others (please consult the editors if you have additional ideas) Comprising works by scholars, professionals, and practitioners from around the globe, Interfaith Research, Education, and Practice: Beyond the Divide will be a ground-breaking interdisciplinary publication on inter-religious thought and engagement. Published by Springer Nature, one of the global Top-Five academic publishers, it will draw from the experience and success of the books Reimagining Christian Education (Springer, 2018), Innovating Christian Education Research (Springer, 2021) and Beyond Belief (Springer, 2021), among others. EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST Expressions of interest to contribute to the book, initially consisting of a 200-word abstract, with the title of the work, qualifications, and the full contact details of the authors, should be sent to Dr Johannes M. Luetz at: jluetz@usc.edu.au. Details on the submission and the peer-review process will be shared with those authors whose abstracts are accepted. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 11 February 2022. Full papers are due by 31 May 2022. The book is expected to be launched in late-2022/early 2023. Editorial Team: Dr Johannes M. Luetz, School of Law and Society, University of the Sunshine Coast; Rev Professor Denise A. Austin, Deputy Vice President Research and Standards, Alphacrucis College; Dr Adis Duderija, Centre for Social and Cultural Research, Griffith University. Complete call for papers also at Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology: https://fore.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/CFP_Interfaith_Research_Education_Practice.pdf
Project
FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS This Call for Papers (CFP) invites expressions of interest to contribute to the new book “Climate Change Adaptation in the Pacific Islands: Opportunities for Faith-Engaged Approaches”, to be published as part of Springer Nature’s “Climate Change Management Series”, the world’s leading peer-reviewed book series on matters related to climate change https://www.springer.com/series/8740 . More than 1,000 climate researchers have been able to document and disseminate their work as part of this series, which has published 38 volumes to date, among which are ground-breaking publications such as the “Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation” (3 volumes; more than 100 authors) and “Handbook of Climate Change Management” (due in 2021; more than 300 authors). As a peer-reviewed and indexed publication, contributions to the book count as high-impact scientific outputs, which may be used for promotion and tenure purposes. Many scientists and academics have benefitted from this over the years. Please note below how to submit your expression of interest to contribute to the new book, which will be edited by Dr Johannes M. Luetz (CHC/UNSW) and Professor Patrick D. Nunn (USC). Call for Papers: Climate Change Adaptation in the Pacific Islands: Opportunities for Faith-Engaged Approaches BACKGROUND As the region in the world perhaps most exposed to climate change, the Pacific Islands face uncertain futures and are in need of adaptation solutions that are both effective and sustainable. Yet because adaptation interventions have been mostly externally designed, funded and implemented, they have uncritically privileged a scientific and technocratic worldview that contrasts sharply with that of most Pacific Island people. Most interventions intended to reduce exposure to environmental risk and to enable effective and sustainable adaptation to climate change in the Pacific Islands region have failed to acknowledge influences on decisionmaking of spirituality and connectedness to Nature. In the light of the almost total Christianization of Pacific Islands within the past century, such intervention failures are surprising. The situation cannot continue because every day the need for adaptation to climate change that is effective and sustainable is growing. Given that in the Pacific Islands region decisionmakers are likely to be influenced more by tradition and local precedent than by science, this book makes the purposive exploration of opportunities for faith-engaged approaches to climate change adaptation a fertile and promising undertaking. It is against this background that suitably qualified experts and project teams are invited to contribute to the edited volume “Climate Change Adaptation in the Pacific Islands: Opportunities for Faith-Engaged Approaches”. Experiences, perspectives and lessons gathered in the book will be invaluable for both policy and practice serving the cause of climate change adaptation in Pacific Island communities. A better understanding of the science-spirituality nexus in the Pacific will also enable more sustainable and locally meaningful adaptation responses. CONTRIBUTION • In addition to featuring the findings of case studies, literary analyses, field projects and empirical research, the volume will contain a wide range of perspectives exemplifying the diversity of faith-engaged approaches across the Pacific Island region. • A unique feature of this interdisciplinary peer reviewed book is its strong practice-oriented focus that promotes “more-than-scientific yet not anti-scientific responses to climate change that are locally meaningful and morally compelling” (Hannah Fair, 2018). • Comprising peer reviewed works by scholars, professionals and practitioners from across Oceania, the book addresses a critical gap in the literature and represents a ground-breaking interdisciplinary contribution to climate change adaptation in the Pacific Island region intended to underwrite its people’s effective and sustained adaptation to climate change, thereby minimizing its impacts on their lives. ENVISAGED CHAPTER TOPICS Topics include (but are not limited to) the following cross-cutting themes and examples: Context: Past, present and future perspectives • Opening contextual discourses on environment, belief and empiricism • Environment and belief in the Pacific Islands (the history of ‘Pacific people’s linkage of environment and deity’ with examples, e.g., disasters and divine attribution, etc.) • Faith-based rationalisations of past climate change • Faith-based opportunities for future climate change adaptation Theory: Concepts, narratives and theoretical frameworks • Exploratory discourses: the case for faith-engaged approaches in the Pacific • Ecotheology, ‘creation care’ and ecological hermeneutics • Epistemological and eschatological perspectives • Integrated discourses: bridging the science-spirituality divide — or is this “an illicit melange of elements best left separate”? (Wolfgang Kempf, 2017) • Creating consilience: conjoining contributions from the sciences and humanities • Enlisting religious convictions in the service of climate change adaptation as a “motivational force not mirrored by economics or science” (Hannah Fair, 2018) Practice: Empirical research and praxis-informed case examples • Leveraging spiritual leadership for policy development and regulatory change • Quantitative and qualitative research, reviews and analyses • Climate change and worldview persuasion: Theories, practices and realities • Imagining barriers: how positionality affects insider-outsider adaptation discourse • Case studies and grassroots examples of innovative faith-engaged adaptation practice Doctrine: Scriptural contributions and perspectives • Holy books: opportunities and challenges for effecting faith-engaged adaptation practice • Scripture and climate change adaptation praxis: Gold mine or mine field? • Scriptural reflections on longing and belonging, home and homelessness, human migration, displacement and resettlement • Scriptural narratives and representations: Noah as an icon of pre-disaster preparedness • Theological and hermeneutical perspectives on “end time prophecy” and Biblical eschatology Engagement: Engaging stakeholders and constituencies • Professors, pastors or politicians … different epistemologies for different constituencies? • The role of the Pacific Conference of Churches • Mormonism in the Pacific Islands • Engaging religious stakeholders: Inter-denominationalism, ecumenicalism, church alliances, parachurch organisations, multi-faith coalitions • Indigenous perspectives on place, culture, language, worldview and identity Reflections: • Limits to faith-engaged approaches Other contributions would be welcome. Please consult the editors if you have additional ideas. EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST The book will be published as part of Springer Nature’s “Climate Change Management Series”, the world’s leading and most influential peer-reviewed book series on matters related to climate change https://www.springer.com/series/8740 . Expressions of interest to contribute to the book, initially consisting of a 200-word abstract, with the title of the work, qualifications and the full contact details of the authors, should be sent to Dr. Johannes Luetz jluetz@chc.edu.au. Details on the online submission and the peer-review process will be shared with those authors whose abstracts are accepted. The deadline for the submissions of abstracts is 31 March 2020. Full papers are due by 30 June 2020. The book is expected to be launched in late-2020. Editors: Dr Johannes M. Luetz (CHC/UNSW) jluetz@chc.edu.au and Professor Patrick D. Nunn (USC) pnunn@usc.edu.au