Johanne Vad

Johanne Vad
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · School of GeoSciences

BSc Biology, MS Ecology and Evolutionnary Biology, PhD Marine Biology

About

42
Publications
6,658
Reads
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336
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2018 - present
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2014 - October 2018
Heriot-Watt University
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2010 - June 2014
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris
Position
  • Bachelor and Master's Student

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Holobionts formed by a host organism and associated symbionts are key biological units in marine ecosystems where they are responsible for fundamental ecosystem services. Therefore, understanding anthropogenic impacts on holobionts is essential. Sponges (Phylum Porifera) are ideal holobiont models. They host a complex microbial community and provid...
Article
Full-text available
Many industrially significant compounds have been derived from natural products in the environment. Research efforts so far have contributed to the discovery of beneficial natural products that have improved the quality of life on Earth. As one of the sources of natural products, marine sponges have been progressively recognised as microbial hotspo...
Article
Full-text available
Aim We assessed the effects of regional oceanographic shifts on the macrofaunal biodiversity and biogeography of cold-water coral reefs (CWCRs). CWCRs are often hotspots of biodiversity and ecosystem services and are in the frontline of exposure to multiple human pressures and climate change. Almost nothing is known about how large-scale atmospheri...
Article
Full-text available
This study presents a novel approach resulting in the first cold-water coral reef biomass maps, used to assess associated ecosystem functions, such as carbon (C) stock and turnover. We focussed on two dominant ecosystem engineers at the Mingulay Reef Complex, the coral Lophelia pertusa (rubble, live and dead framework) and the sponge Spongosorites...
Chapter
Sponges (Phylum Porifera) are the oldest extant Metazoans. In the deep sea, sponges can occur at high densities forming habitats known as sponge grounds. Sponge grounds can extend over large areas of up to hundreds of km2 and are biodiversity hotspots. However, as human activities, including deep-water hydrocarbon extraction, continue to expand int...
Article
Used during an oil spill to minimise the formation of an oil slick, dispersants have negative biological effects on marine model organisms. However, no study has investigated the impacts of dispersants on sponges. Here, we examine the effects of water accommodated oil fraction (WAF - oil in seawater), chemically enhanced WAF (CEWAF - oil and disper...
Article
Full-text available
The deep sea plays a critical role in global climate regulation through uptake and storage of heat and carbon dioxide. However, this regulating service causes warming, acidification and deoxygenation of deep waters, leading to decreased food availability at the seafloor. These changes and their projections are likely to affect productivity, biodive...
Article
Full-text available
Video and image data are regularly used in the field of benthic ecology to document biodiversity. However, their use is subject to a number of challenges, principally the identification of taxa within the images without associated physical specimens. The challenge of applying traditional taxonomic keys to the identification of fauna from images has...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the scale of anthropogenic impacts is critical in order to understand ecosystem effects of human activities, within the context of changes caused by natural environmental variability. We applied spatial eigenfunction analysis to disentangle effects of anthropogenic drivers from environmental factors on species assembly in the Faroe-Shet...
Preprint
Full-text available
Video and image data are regularly used in the field of benthic ecology to document biodiversity. However, their use is subject to a number of challenges, principally the identification of taxa within the images without associated physical specimens. The challenge of applying traditional taxonomic keys to the identification of fauna from images has...
Article
Full-text available
Discovery and understanding of fragile deep-sea habitats like sponge aggregations, are being outpaced by anthropogenic resource exploitation. Sustainable ocean development in the Faroe-Shetland Channel Nature Conservation Marine Protected Area (FSC NCMPA; northeast Atlantic), which harbors sponge aggregations, now requires adaptive management in th...
Presentation
Distribution, density and size of deep-sea sponge morphotypes in the Faroe-Shetland Channel Sponge Belt Nature Conservation Marine Protected Area.
Article
Full-text available
All marine communities in Greenland are experiencing rapid environmental change, and to understand the effects on those structured by seaweeds, baseline records are vital. The kelp and coralline algae habitats along Greenland’s coastlines are rarely studied, and we fill this knowledge gap for the area around Nuuk, west Greenland. Using subtidal swa...
Article
Full-text available
Marine management developments are occurring across the United Kingdom with the major aim to ensure economic growth and security of marine resources via the provision of legislative guidelines for sustainable management of activities within the marine environment. Many of these directives also provide guidance for maintaining ecologically valuable...
Article
Sponges form an important component of benthic ecosystems from shallow littoral to hadal depths. In the deep ocean, beyond the continental shelf, sponges can form high-density fields, constituting important habitats supporting rich benthic communities. Yet these habitats remain relatively unexplored. The oil and gas industry has played an important...
Chapter
Sponges form an important component of benthic ecosystems from shallow littoral to hadal depths. In the deep ocean, beyond the continental shelf, sponges can form high-density fields, constituting important habitats supporting rich benthic communities. Yet these habitats remain relatively unexplored. The oil and gas industry has played an important...
Article
Full-text available
Coral growth patterns result from an interplay of coral biology and environmental conditions. In this study colony size and proportion of live and dead skeletons in the cold-water coral (CWC) Lophelia pertusa (Linnaeus, 1758) were measured using video footage from Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) transects conducted at the inshore Mingulay Reef Comp...
Data
Table of the Lophelia pertusa colony measurements used in this study
Article
Full-text available
We present the first remotely operated vehicle investigation of megabenthic communities (1004-1695 m water depth) on the Hebrides Terrace Seamount (Northeast Atlantic). Conductivity-temperature-depth casts showed rapid light attenuation below the summit and an oceanographic regime on the flanks consistent with an internal tide, and high short-term...
Article
We provide a case study to demonstrate how a key ecosystem function of coral reefs (habitat provision) co-benefits both sharks and humans. Spawning grounds of the blackmouth catshark Galeus melastomus were discovered using seabed and video surveys on the Mingulay Reef Complex, a seascape of cold-water coral reefs off western Scotland. Spawning habi...
Article
Full-text available
Seaweeds exhibit a number of adaptations to cope with strong selective pressures imposed by shallow marine environments. The exceptional ability of the annual, brown seaweed Desmarestia viridis, to produce and store high concentrations of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in intracellular vacuoles, makes it a particularly compelling model for studies of causes...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
iAtlantic will assess the risks and vulnerabilities of deep- and open-ocean Atlantic ecosystems to climate change and other stressors to identify where and when improved management measures are most needed to maintain ocean health. Website: http://www.iatlantic.eu/ This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement no. 818123.This output reflects only the author's view and the European Union cannot be held responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein. Date: 1 June 2019 – 31 May 2023
Project
To create a network of students and researchers working on coralline algae around the globe where publications, project ideas, presentations, posters, methodological developments, project set-backs, sampling sites, and more can be shared. The Coralline Algae Network aims to provide a virtual platform that brings together people conducting research on coralline algae in order to facilitate the progress of our understanding of these important marine organisms and their ecosystems.