Johanna Yletyinen

Johanna Yletyinen
University of Jyväskylä | JYU ·  Department of Biological and Environmental Science

PhD, M.Sc., M.Ed.

About

27
Publications
8,440
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
613
Citations
Introduction
Main areas of expertise: - Natural resource management/governance - Resilience - Social-ecological systems, especially those related to natural resources - Network science - Interdisciplinary research - Systems science
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - August 2021
Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research
Position
  • Researcher
September 2016 - September 2018
University of Canterbury
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2012 - June 2016
Stockholm Resilience Centre
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
July 2012 - July 2014
Stockholm Resilience Centre
Field of study
  • Natural Resource Management
June 2012 - June 2016
Stockholm Resilience Centre
Field of study
  • Natural Resource Management
January 2003 - March 2008
Stockholm University
Field of study
  • Physical Geography (Earth System Science), Biology

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
One contribution of 16 to a Theme Issue 'Marine regime shifts around the globe: theory, drivers and impacts'. Marine ecosystems can experience regime shifts, in which they shift from being organized around one set of mutually reinforcing structures and processes to another. Anthropogenic global change has broadly increased a wide variety of process...
Article
Full-text available
Species composition and habitats are changing at unprecedented rates in the world's oceans, potentially causing entire food webs to shift to structurally and functionally different regimes. Despite the severity of these regime shifts, elucidating the precise nature of their underlying processes has remained difficult. We address this challenge with...
Article
Full-text available
Global environmental change and humanity's growing demands for resources have generated concerns regarding how much pressure Earth systems can absorb without drastic, potentially irreversible consequences. In natural resource production systems, tipping points can generate immediate threats to human well-being. However, empirically exploiting conce...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of global warming are felt earlier in Arctic regions than elsewhere in the world. Now research shows that Arctic marine food webs can adapt to climate change — but the study authors warn that this impression of resilience may be false in the long term.
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the function of social networks can make a critical contribution to achieving desirable environmental outcomes. Social-ecological systems are complex, adaptive systems in which environmental decision makers adapt to a changing social and ecological context. However, it remains unclear how multiple social influences interact with envir...
Article
Full-text available
Despite many sectors of society striving for sustainability in environmental management, humans often fail to identify and act on the connections and processes responsible for social–ecological tipping points. Part of the problem is the fracturing of environmental management and social–ecological research into ecosystem domains (land, freshwater, a...
Article
Full-text available
Global environmental and societal changes threaten the cultures of indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLC). Despite the importance of IPLC worldviews and knowledge to sustaining human well-being and biodiversity, risks to these cultural resources are commonly neglected in environmental governance, in part because impacts can be indirect and...
Article
Full-text available
The unprecedented level of threat facing many of the world's natural and cultural systems calls for the collaboration of multiple interest groups to engage in aligned environmental action. Understanding interest groups' relational values (i.e. values in relation to an ecosystem and its people), and the constraints they experience in enacting those...
Article
Full-text available
The knowledge systems and practices of Indigenous Peoples and local communities play critical roles in safeguarding the biological and cultural diversity of our planet. Globalization, government policies, capitalism, colonialism, and other rapid social-ecological changes threaten the relationships between Indigenous Peoples and local communities an...
Article
Full-text available
Social-ecological systems dependent on fisheries must be resilient or adapt to remain viable in the face of change. Here, we identified possible interventions (termed “adaptation options”) from published literature, aimed at supporting social or ecological resilience and/or aiding adaptation to changes induced by environmental or social stressors....
Article
Full-text available
Human activity is changing the biosphere in unprecedented ways, and addressing this challenge will require changes in individual and community patterns of behavior. One approach to managing individual behaviors is “top-down” and involves imposing sanctions through legislative frameworks. However, of itself, a top-down framework does not appear suff...
Article
Full-text available
1. Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity and human well-being. Scientists and environmental managers typically seek ecological solutions to the biological invasion problem. However, micro-scale social factors, such as landowner attitudes and social interactions that underlie landowners' willingness to control invasive species, may...
Preprint
Global environmental and societal changes threaten the cultures of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLC). Despite the importance of IPLC worldviews and knowledge systems to human well-being and biodiversity, risks to these cultural resources are commonly simplified or neglected in environmental impact assessments, in part because cultural...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainable fisheries management plays a critical role in supporting healthy marine ecosystems and the livelihoods of millions of people. An emerging view on fisheries management emphasizes the need to manage fisheries as complex social-ecological systems. Yet, our understanding of the outcomes of fisheries management from a social-ecological persp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Marine fish stock collapses are a major concern for scientists and society due to the potentially severe impacts on ecosystem resilience, food security and livelihoods. Yet the general state of harvested fish populations has proven difficult to summarize, and the actual occurrence rate of stock collapses remains unclear. We have carried out a liter...
Article
Full-text available
As the world’s social-environmental problems increasingly extend across boundaries, both disciplinary and political, there is a growing need for interdisciplinarity, not only in research per se, but also in doctoral education. We present the common pitfalls of interdisciplinary research in doctoral education, illustrating approaches towards solutio...
Data
Supporting Information: Regime shifts in marine communities: a complex systems perspective on food web dynamics
Article
Full-text available
Oceans are exposed to anthropogenic climate change shifting marine systems toward potential instabilities. The physical, biological and social implications of such shifts can be assessed within individual scientific disciplines, but can only be fully under- stood by combining knowledge and expertise across disciplines. For climate change related pr...
Article
Full-text available
Marine scientists broadly agree on which major processes influence the sustainability of marine environments worldwide. Recent studies argue that such shared perceptions crucially shape scientific agendas and are subject to a confirmation bias. Based on these findings a more explicit engagement with scientists’ (shared) perceptions of global change...
Article
Full-text available
Several marine ecosystems under anthropogenic pressure have experienced shifts from one ecological state to another. In the central Baltic Sea, the regime shift of the 1980s has been associated with food-web reorganization and redirection of energy flow pathways. These long-term dynamics from 1974 to 2006 have been simulated here using a food-web m...
Article
Changes in climate, in combination with intensive exploitation of marine resources, have caused large-scale reorganizations in many of the world's marine ecosystems during the past decades. The Baltic Sea in Northern Europe is one of the systems most affected. In addition to being exposed to persistent eutrophication, intensive fishing, and one of...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The project is a collaboration between all young researchers (Ph.D.s and post docs) affiliated with NorMER aiming to address the following question: What is the current state and the trends of climate change research within the Nordic region in relation to NorMER? Specifically: within the NorMER focus areas what has been studied so far? What are the gaps and what are the trends? The approach is to create a database categorizing the literature relevant to NorMER (limited by certain criteria). The content of the database can then be visualized and synthesised in different ways to identify the focus of current and previous research. The database can be used to answer specific questions such as: which species are the most studied in the climate change research within the North Atlantic? Most people may have an opinion about this, but with the database the question can be answered using facts rather than speculation.The database will also contain information about the spatial and temporal structure of the relevant literature such that trends in climate change research can be quantified, but also trends in more complex interactions such as cod/temperature studies or trends in interdisciplinary work in the Nordic region and their spatial variability. All publications using the database will include all young researchers as authors. Such publications would not only be of value at the individual level, but also identify NorMER as a coherent center, which is an important message to send to the funders of NorMER and the public in general.
Project
The project is a collaboration between all young researchers (Ph.D.s and post docs) affiliated with NorMER aiming to address the following question: What is the current state and the trends of climate change research within the Nordic region in relation to NorMER? Specifically: within the NorMER focus areas what has been studied so far? What are the gaps and what are the trends? The approach is to create a database categorizing the literature relevant to NorMER (limited by certain criteria). The content of the database can then be visualized and synthesised in different ways to identify the focus of current and previous research. The database can be used to answer specific questions such as: which species are the most studied in the climate change research within the North Atlantic? Most people may have an opinion about this, but with the database the question can be answered using facts rather than speculation.The database will also contain information about the spatial and temporal structure of the relevant literature such that trends in climate change research can be quantified, but also trends in more complex interactions such as cod/temperature studies or trends in interdisciplinary work in the Nordic region and their spatial variability. All publications using the database will include all young researchers as authors. Such publications would not only be of value at the individual level, but also identify NorMER as a coherent center, which is an important message to send to the funders of NorMER and the public in general.