Johanna Schumacher

Johanna Schumacher
Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research | IOW · Coastal Sea - Management & Planning

MRM in Coastal and Marine Management

About

20
Publications
5,480
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215
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
214 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study is to assess existing conventional and hypothetical nature-based coastal-protection schemes using a comparative ecosystem service assessment, based on quantitative data and literature as well as on stakeholder views. We assessed three conventional groin systems and three building-with-nature scenarios including an expanded bea...
Article
Full-text available
To combat the persistent eutrophication in coastal waters, sustainable sea-based measures are recommended. Yet, they are the subject of controversial stakeholder discussion, which hampers the implementation and planning process. The aim of this study is to evaluate if a participatory mapping (PM) approach and ecosystem service assessments (ESA) can...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial assessments of ecosystem services (ES) are needed to fulfil EU policy requirements and to support practical applications of the ES concept in policy implementation. So far, ES assessments have largely focused on terrestrial systems. A joint approach for land and sea is especially lacking. To overcome this gap, we present a novel spatial hab...
Article
Full-text available
Decision-support tools (DSTs) synthesize complex information to assist environmental managers in the decision-making process. Here, we review DSTs applied in the Baltic Sea area, to investigate how well the ecosystem approach is reflected in them, how different environmental problems are covered, and how well the tools meet the needs of the end use...
Article
Full-text available
Decision support tools (DSTs), like models, GIS-based planning tools and assessment tools, play an important role in incorporating scientific information into decision-making and facilitating policy implementation. In an interdisciplinary Baltic research group, we compiled 43 DSTs developed to support ecosystem-based management of the Baltic Sea an...
Article
Full-text available
An important aim of the European Sustainable Development Strategy is to measure the state of sustainability in coastal communities. While numerous indicators have been developed to estimate a regions sustainability, they go largely unused, due to the difficulty in applying them over a broad region. In an effort to improve upon this situation, we ha...
Article
Full-text available
Community involvement and genuine engagement with citizens is an important, integral element of the Systems Approach Framework (SAF). The SAF provides a structure for an Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) process using a multidisciplinary approach that integrates environmental, social and economic viability and well-being. An assessment of the SAF...
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The Systems Approach Framework with an integrated Ecological-Social-Economic assessment was applied to address the issue of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) farming in the large Oder (Szczecin) Lagoon, southern Baltic Sea. Heavy eutrophication hampers the use of the lagoon and zebra mussel farming is considered as new use and potential measure t...
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Sustainable management of coastal systems can only be achieved with an effective science-policy interface that integrates the three pillars of sustainable development: environmental protection, social progress and economic growth. The Systems Approach Framework (SAF) provides a structure to guide such a process by embracing the challenge of assessi...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal waters provide a wide range of ecosystem services (ES), but are under intensive human use, face fast degradation and are subject to increasing pressures and changes in near future. As consequence, European Union (EU) water policies try to protect, restore and manage coastal and marine systems in a sustainable way. The most important EU dire...
Article
Lagoons often suffer from eutrophication. Floating islands planted with native emergent macrophytes offer a solution for internal nutrient removal. These’active barriers’ have been applied in various inland waters, but never in coastal and marine environments. First coastal floating wetlands were installed in different lagoons along the Southern Ba...
Article
Stakeholder involvement plays a crucial role within Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) and is considered beneficial for gaining trust and knowledge and reducing conflicts. Nevertheless, disagreement and opposition among stakeholders and lack of manager experiences in participatory approaches have caused delays in ICM processes. A major challenge i...
Article
Full-text available
Markgrafenheide-Hütelmoor covers a total area of 1000 ha (about 490 ha are coastal moor) and a coastline of about 6 km. This touristy area belongs to the city of Rostock in Germany. As response to sea level rise and heavy coastal erosion, the small seaside resort Markgrafenheide received a comprehensive storm surge protection until 2006. Subsequent...
Article
Full-text available
Over 350 European Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) ‘best practice’ case studies are documented in the OURCOAST online public database, to ensure that lessons learned from experiences and practices are shared and improve coastal management practices. However, concrete criteria for ‘best practice’ are missing and a critical evaluation of the...
Article
Full-text available
The article Assessing coastal management case studies around Europe using an indicator based tool, written by Donalda Karnauskaitė, Gerald Schernewski, Johanna Schumacher, Rebecca Grunert, and Ramūnas Povilanskas, was originally published electronically on the publisher’s internet portal.
Book
Full-text available
Articles: - What makes a good scientific ICZM tool? - Weaknesses and shortcomings in ICZM – is it possible to overcome them? - Distance-learning on environmental protection and coastal management – facing an increasing demand - What’s in the toolbox for ICZM? - The Ecosystem Services Assessment Tool (ESAT) – Assessing ecosystem services and trackin...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Floating macrophyte island systems aim to restore and rehabilitate coastal habitats and improve local water quality by nutrient absorption and removal. The project applies, so called, 'active’ or 'living’ barrier units to improve water quality and create bathing conditions, inside the South Baltic lagoons, where algal blooms and sediment resuspension prevent recreational bathing. Floating islands are expected to improve eutrophic conditions since the root systems in the water column take up nutrients.
Project
The SECOS II projects builds upon the SECOS I achievements that aims to understand, determine and specify sediment services in the German Baltic Sea. Sediment functions are modes of deposition of discarded material, transformation of eutrophic substances into non-reactive forms, detoxification processes, sediment stabilization, regulation of biodiversity, regulation of production patterns, just to name a few positive effects considered by society. Negative functions in this respect can be the production of hydrogen sulfide, emission of green-house gases, negative effects on biodiversity. SECOS II will close important knowledge gaps still open after SECOS I phase, to assess such sediment functions and synthesise the available knowledge in a form that the available information is usable for the use of scientific, political and administrative stakeholders. Thus, SECOS II aims for a better understanding of transport, exchange and interaction processes between water and sediments, will provide a mapping tools for areal quantification of structural and biogeochemical properties linked to sediment functions. To do so, SECOS II aims for the extension and application of a marine ecosystem service evaluation framework, that covers the German Baltic Sea, spatially integrates natural scientific data, model simulation results and socio-economic aspects into an evaluation tool that visualises the societal benefits and serves as an umbrella for the integration of marine policies. The outcome is envisaged as the integration and provision of spatial data and maps (Baltic Sea Atlas) as a scientific basis for the implementation of major marine and coastal policies (Marine Strategy Framework Directive, Water Framework Directive, Habitat Directive). Guiding principles for our work in the second phase of SECOS are a) a focus on data aggregation, analysis and spatial extrapolation, b) the focus on aspects with immediate relevance to descriptors and indicators in the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and c) the provision of products with high relevance for policies and management. All synthesized data will, if scientifically useful, be spatial extrapolated and presented in the Baltic Sea Atlas, a WEBGIS – application which is linked with the KüNO Portal ad thereby with the MDI-DE data portal. SECOS II is accordingly structured to fullfill its tasks. Workpackage (WP) 1 will be in charge of the coordination of the project, the synthesis and integration of results and findings and the dissemination of the products. The Baltic Sea Atlas is the key product of this WP and SECOS as a whole. Therefore WP 2 will concentrate of filling serious gaps of knowledge for mapping and modelling of sediment properties, biodiversity and habitat classification. Linking the inventory of substances in the Baltic Sea sediments with functional properties, evaluate the function of benthic communities, and model the resulting sediment services under changing environmental conditions are the subtasks of this WP 2. The quantification of the transport of fluids, gases, nutrients and metals across the sediment-water-interface in SECOS key regions is the task of WP 3. WP 4 will provide an ecosystem service assessment for the German Baltic Sea including a spatial integration of indicators and ecosystem services for the areas.
Project
Objectives are - to further-develop a Systems Approach Framework (SAF) for science and policy integration in the coastal zone into an applicable, user-friendly tool with high practical relevance that allows users to manage with multiple, complex, and diverse issues in the coastal zone and integration of spatial information and concern; - to tackle major thematic coastal issues that require a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach, in a manner that is structured, transparent and provides a framework to deal with complex issues and applicable for evaluating solutions with end-users; - to further-develop and apply an indicator-based concept that allows users to measure the sustainability and the success of SAF, ICZM and MSP, as well as a concept to integrate the SAF into existing policy frameworks (e.g. EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region, EU Integrated Maritime Policy, EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), Water Framework Directive (WFD), Natura 2000 as well as the Baltic Sea Action Plan); - to carry out intensive SAF training and education for academics and professionals in order to increase the capacity to deal with complex coastal issues in a systematic way; - to strengthen and link existing Baltic ICM activities and initiatives into a lasting Baltic coastal management competence network.