Johanna Rode-Margono

Johanna Rode-Margono
Chester Zoo · Field Programmes and Conservation Science

BSc, MSc, PhD

About

41
Publications
33,820
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645
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2011 - April 2015
Oxford Brookes University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Background Nepenthes clipeata is a Critically Endangered plant species with the population at its only location in the wild, Gunung (Mount) Kelam in Kalimantan, Indonesia, under threat – its nutrient relationships have not been studied. Aims To improve understanding of the autecology of N. clipeata by assessing the current population and providing...
Article
Animals have evolved an array of spectacular weapons, including antlers, forceps, proboscises, stingers, tusks and horns [1]. Weapons can be present in males and females of species needing to defend critical limiting resources, including food (rhinoceros beetles, Trypoxylus) and territories (fang blennies, Meiacanthus) [1, 2, 3]. Chemicals, includi...
Article
Full-text available
Due to hybridisation and breakdown of reproduction barriers the Java warty pig an endangered suid endemic to Java, may be assimilated into the gene pools of the more common Indonesian banded pig and become extinct. Here, we aimed to detect introgressive hybridisation between both suids by microsatellite genotyping warty pigs from two captive popula...
Article
Full-text available
Slow lorises are enigmatic animal that represent the only venomous primate lineage. Their defensive secretions have received little attention. In this study we determined the full length sequence of the protein secreted by their unique brachial glands. The full length sequences displayed homology to the main allergenic protein present in cat dander...
Article
Full-text available
Despite being heavily exploited, pangolins (Pholidota: Manidae) have been subject to limited research, resulting in a lack of reliable population estimates and standardised survey methods for the eight extant species. Camera trapping represents a unique opportunity for broad-scale collaborative species monitoring due to its largely non-discriminato...
Article
Full-text available
Despite being heavily exploited, pangolins (Pholidota: Manidae) have been subject to limited research, resulting in a lack of reliable population estimates and standardised survey methods for the eight extant species. Camera trapping represents a unique opportunity for broad-scale collaborative species monitoring due to its largely non-discriminato...
Article
The island of Bawean, Indonesia, is home to the endemic Bawean warty pig Sus verrucosus blouchi and Bawean deer Axis kuhlii. Despite their threatened status, no long-term monitoring programme is in place for either species. Using random encounter and occupancy modelling based on, camera-trap days in and we aimed to provide population estimates and...
Article
Full-text available
Improving technology and increasing affordability mean that camera trapping—the use of remotely triggered cameras to photograph wildlife—is becoming an increasingly common tool in the monitoring and conservation of wild populations. Each camera trap study generates a vast amount of data, which need to be processed and labeled before analysis. Tradi...
Article
Full-text available
Estimations of species abundance are a common goal of wildlife monitoring surveys, but debate remains as to which methods are theoretically and practically most useful. Abundance-induced heterogeneity (AIH) models developed in the early 2000s allowed estimation of point abundance from repeated presence-absence data (e.g. occupancy models), and adva...
Article
Full-text available
Estimations of species abundance are a common goal of wildlife monitoring surveys, but debate remains as to which methods are theoretically and practically most useful. Abundance-induced heterogeneity (AIH) models developed in the early 2000s allowed estimation of point abundance from repeated presence-absence data (e.g. occupancy models), and adva...
Chapter
Names Genus: Sus Linnaeus, 1758 Species: Javan warty pig Sus verrucosus Boie, 1832; Bawean warty pig Sus blouchi Groves and Grubb, 2011 Names in other languages: French: Sanglier de Java; German: Javan-Pustelschwein; Indonesian: Babi kutil; Indonesian/Javanese: Babi goteng; Indonesian/Sundanese: Babi gagadungan; Italian: Cinghiale di Giava; Spanish...
Article
Full-text available
Crop raiding by wild animals can cause damage to local farmers’ fields with substantial economic losses especially in rural areas. On the other hand, local people’s response to crop damage, such as hunting, can seriously imperil the populations of threatened species. Perceptions and attitudes shape these humanwildlife conflicts. In this study we in...
Article
Full-text available
The Bawean warty pig (Sus blouchi) is an endemic pig species confined to the 192 km2 large island of Bawean in the Java Sea, Indonesia. Due to a lack of quantitative ecological research, understanding of natural history and conservation requirements have so far been based solely on anecdotal information from interviews with local people and study o...
Article
Full-text available
Indonesia has amongst the highest primate species richness, and many species are included on the country's protected species list, partially to prevent over-exploitation. Nevertheless traders continue to sell primates in open wildlife markets especially on the islands of Java and Bali. We surveyed 13 wildlife markets in 2012-2014 and combined our r...
Article
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Javan slow lorises (Primates: Nycticebus javanicus) are heavily threatened by anthropogenic disturbance and the illegal animal trade, both of which may impact parasite loads. They are also venomous, which may have evolved to help reduce parasite burdens. We present analyses of faecal samples for evidence of gastrointestinal parasites and data based...
Article
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Venom delivery systems (VDS) are common in the animal kingdom, but rare amongst mammals. New definitions of venom allow us to reconsider its diversity amongst mammals by reviewing the VDS of Chiroptera, Eulipotyphla, Monotremata, and Primates. All orders use modified anterior dentition as the venom delivery apparatus, except Monotremata, which poss...
Article
Full-text available
Testis size is an indirect indicator of a species' mating system, along with sexual size and canine dimorphism, existence and usage of mating and advertisement calls as well as the spatial distribution of males and females ready to mate in solitary species. Upon its recent discovery, the northern giant mouse lemur Mirza zaza was suggested to have a...
Article
Full-text available
Arthropods play a significant role in ecosystems as prey for animals such as insectivorous primates. The venomous Javan slow loris (Nycticebus javanicus) is a nocturnal primate endemic to the island of Java, Indonesia. It remains unknown if its venom is partially sequestered from noxious arthropod prey. We studied the little-known arthropod communi...
Article
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Wildlife trade is a major threat to wild populations of many species, especially in South-east Asia. In Indonesia, Common Palm Civet Paradoxurus hermaphroditus has become increasingly exploited as an exotic pet and for the production of civet coffee. The species is not protected in Indonesia but its commercial trade is subject to an annual quota sy...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife trade is a major threat to wild populations of many species, especially in Southeast Asia. In Indonesia, Common Palm Civet Paradoxurus hermaphroditus has become increasingly exploited as an exotic pet and for the production of civet coffee. The species is not protected in Indonesia but its commercial trade is subject to an annual quota sys...
Article
Full-text available
Considered amongst the most endangered primates in the world, Javan Slow Lorises Nycticebus javanicus É. Geoffroy Saint- Hilaire are threatened by habitat destruction, and by the wildlife trade for pets and traditional medicines. Despite some studies of captive or rescued and released animals, little is known about the behaviour and ecology of wild...
Article
Full-text available
Predation pressure, food availability, and activity may be af- fected by level of moonlight and climatic conditions. While many nocturnal mammals reduce activity at high lunar illumination to avoid predators (lunarphobia), most visually-oriented nocturnal primates and birds increase activity in bright nights (lunarphilia) to improve foraging effici...
Article
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The Javan slow loris Nycticebus javanicus is threatened by habitat decline and is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. Information on its distribution and habitat preferences is still lacking, and so far the distribution of the Javan slow loris has only been quantified via ecological niche modelling based on museum specimens an...
Article
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Most small carnivores and nocturnal mammals in general on the Indonesian island of Java lack frequent and comprehensive distribution surveys. Nocturnal surveys by direct observations from walked transects (survey effort 127 km, about 254 hours) and fixed-point surveys at a total of 14 areas throughout Java during 2012–2014, supplemented by camera-t...
Article
Only seven types of mammals are known to be venomous, including slow lorises (Nycticebus spp.). Despite the evolutionary significance of this unique adaptation amongst Nycticebus, the structure and function of slow loris venom is only just beginning to be understood. Here we review what is known about the chemical structure of slow loris venom. Res...
Article
Full-text available
Background The internet is gaining importance in global wildlife trade and changing perceptions of threatened species. There is little data available to examine the impact that popular Web 2.0 sites play on public perceptions of threatened species. YouTube videos portraying wildlife allow us to quantify these perceptions. Methodology/Principal Fin...
Article
Full-text available
Shelters such as leaf nests, tree holes or vegetation tangles play a crucial role in the life of many nocturnal mammals. While information about characteristics and availability of these resources may help in conservation planning, nest use gives an indication about a species' social organisation. The northern giant mouse lemur (Mirza zaza) is thre...
Article
Full-text available
The golden-headed or Cat Ba langur (Trachypithecus poliocephalus poliocephalus) is endemic to Cat Ba Island in northern Vietnam. Two free-ranging groups were studied for 22 days of data collection. Behavioral data were collected via instantaneous scan sampling for determining the time budget, activity pattern and vertical ranging pattern of these g...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Venom research can have biomedical and therapeutic applications and provide insights into venom evolution in biomedicine and pharma-therapeutics. Due to the traditional definition of “venomous”, and the generally biased study towards well-known and more dangerous and dramatic species, the use of venom in mammals as a bio resource is still under-utilized. Venom has evolved multiple times independently by convergent evolution in the animal kingdom, and occurs in centipedes, scorpions, spiders, several insect orders, cone snails, sea anemones, cephalopods, echinoderms, fish, toxicoferan reptiles and mammals. Four lineages of venomous mammals are recognized yet their venom systems are comparatively little known. Through our studies we hope to improve knowledge of ecology and evolution of venom in mammals with potential impacts for their conservation and society.
Project
The Little Fireface Project (LFP), headed by Professor Anna Nekaris, studies the ecology of the Javan slow loris, and contributes wherever possible to the conservation and ecology of loris species throughout their range. The project’s scope of research is widespread encompassing behavioural ecology, museum studies, genetics, acoustics, taxonomy, conservation education and chemical ecology. The LFP team also conducts evaluated outreach and education programmes for local communities to get them to join the conservation movement. Our mission is to obtain vital data about all loris species to contribute to their conservation in the wild and in captivity, including aiding rescue centres in reintroductions and aiding in the welfare of slow loris pets in countries where it is still legal to keep them. We intensively use, monitor and evaluate social media to inform the public world-wide about the plight of slow lorises to mitigate their trade.