Johann Peter Murmann

Johann Peter Murmann
University of St.Gallen · Institute of Management

PhD
Looking for companies to implementing the "wisdom of the crowd" effect in their organizational processes.

About

91
Publications
47,444
Reads
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2,941
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2018 - present
University of St.Gallen
Position
  • Professor (Full)
January 2016 - July 2018
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • Professor (Full)
January 2006 - December 2015
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (91)
Article
Full-text available
To stimulate a debate about the rise of China's digital economy, this essay compares China and the US in one key area of the digital economy – e-commerce and internet-based services. China still lags behind the US in internet penetration, but it distinguishes itself by building a mobile-first, fiber-intensive, and inclusive digital infrastructure....
Conference Paper
Judgmental forecasting research has demonstrated that forecasters differ in their foresight––their ability to consistently forecast future states of the world accurately. However, the conceptualization of foresight underlying this research stream focuses exclusively on accuracy and thereby, neglects the time dimension of foresight. We develop a rec...
Conference Paper
How will the technological shift from internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs) to battery electric vehicles (BEVs) change the architecture of the automotive industry? Based on unstructured interviews with engineers at large automobile companies and start-ups, we create design structure matrices to compare the technological structure and modulari...
Article
Full-text available
It is of interest in China and across the world to predict whether China will catch up with the most economically advanced nations in innovation capacity. To facilitate an ongoing assessment of China's innovation capacity, the article develops a China Innovation Capacity Growth Index composed of eight separate measures. China's performance in 2020...
Article
Full-text available
Chinese firms have been widely seen as imitative. This historical case study explores what organizational mechanisms allowed Tencent, a Chinese firm in the fast-changing instant messaging (IM) service sector, to achieve a new-to-the-world innovation with its WeChat smartphone app. Tracing the competitive dynamics in the Chinese IM sector from its i...
Article
Overall, we highly recommend Bubbles and Crashes to anyone who is either interested in how technological innovations and narratives shape industry developments or who simply seeks inspiration and guidance on how to combine historical and social science methodologies
Book
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Strategic Management - The Management Transformation of Huawei - by Xiaobo Wu
Article
India began the process of market liberalization that opened it to significant interactions with the world economy in 1991. In this essay, we provide an overarching view of the country's journey toward integration with the global innovation and entrepreneurship network. Major nodes in this global network have two major components that may be metaph...
Article
Full-text available
After reading Jacobides, MacDuffie, and Tae (2016), the success of Tesla in launching a new automobile company in a crowded sector puzzled us. Jacobides, MacDuffie, and Tae (2016) had convinced us that developing the capabilities to become the manufacturer of a complete, safe automobile system would be quite difficult. Since the establishment of th...
Chapter
In a simulation experiment, building on the abductive simulation approach of Brenner and Werker (Comput Econ 30(3):227–244, 2007), we test historical explanations for why German firms came to surpass British and France firms and to dominate the global synthetic dye industry for three decades before World War I while the U.S. never achieved large ma...
Article
This Management of Organization Review (MOR) special issue aims to explore the key features of the innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystem in India. There is recent evidence that innovation and entrepreneurship dynamics in transforming economies differ from like processes in advanced market economies in significant ways (e.g., Maimone, Mudambi, N...
Article
Full-text available
This Management of Organization Review (MOR) special issue aims to explore the key features of the innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystem in India. There is recent evidence that innovation and entrepreneurship dynamics in transforming economies differ from like processes in advanced market economies in significant ways (e.g., Maimone, Mudambi, N...
Article
Let me invite you to travel in your mind to the year 2030. Imagine that you are one of the Senior Editors of MOR and have been asked by the Editor-in-Chief to write a short retrospective on the previous 15 years.
Article
At the June 2016 meeting of the International Association for Chinese Management Research, MOR organized a symposium to discuss the mounting criticisms of empirical social science and subsequent changes, as part of ongoing discussions affecting journal reviewing policies. This article overviews the history of modern empirical social science as the...
Article
Full-text available
In a simulation experiment, building on the abductive simulation approach of Brenner and Werker (2007), we test historical explanations for why German firms came to surpass British and France firms and to dominate the global synthetic dye industry for three decades before World War 1 while the U.S. never achieved large market share despite large ho...
Book
Full-text available
The miracle growth of the Chinese economy has decreased from a compound annual growth rate of 10% to less than 7% in 2015. The two engines of growth - export on a scale never before witnessed and massive infrastructure investments - are reaching the point of diminishing returns. This poses the central question which is explored in this book - can C...
Chapter
Richard R. Nelson (b. 1930) is an American economist who has had a significant influence on the field of strategic management. The fundamental question driving his work is how societies can be organized to improve their material well-being. In answering this question, Nelson identifies sustained technological innovation and a diverse range of often...
Article
Full-text available
International new ventures (INVs) have been documented to exist all around the world, but the literature is silent on the frequency of such companies in different countries. We contend that the propensity of new ventures to internationalize by forming international partnerships is higher in small-domestic demand countries because they have a greate...
Article
Full-text available
How can business historians and evolutionary economists deepen their conversations? The paper argues that in doing detailed studies of how individual firms develop capabilities over time is where the concerns of business historians who want to tell the history of individual firms and the concerns of evolutionary economists overlap. This is area whe...
Chapter
Evolutionary perspectives contend that complex structures in the social and the biological world have developed over time through causal processes that require little or no foresight but considerable trial and error. Evolutionary thought in organizational analysis comprises two distinct intellectual lines. The first, concerned with organizational c...
Article
The article argues that to advance the evolutionary perspective on dynamic firm capabilities it is useful to forge a creative synthesis between history and organization studies. It first gives an overview of methods not widely known among organizational scholars yet extensively used by historians to construct convincing explanations, and then revie...
Article
The literature on international new ventures (INVs) has argued that technological changes and other social factors have made it much easier for new ventures to operate from their inception across different locations. With a help of a hand-collected dataset of new biotech ventures in 11 different countries, we examine key external factors (geographi...
Article
International new ventures (INVs) have been documented to exist all around the world, but the literature is silent on the frequency of such companies in different countries. We contend that the propensity of new ventures to internationalize by forming international partnerships is higher in small-domestic demand countries because they have a greate...
Article
Although researchers often do it subconsciously, every explanation involves choosing a level of abstraction at which the argument proceeds. The dominant North American style of research in Organization Theory, Strategy, and International Business encourages researchers to frame their explanations at the highest level of abstraction where country-le...
Article
Do some top executives matter more than others? Integrating insights from upper echelons and executive mobility research, we suggest that the functional roles performed by top executives shape their value to the firm. We examine the effects of inter-firm executive mobility on firm survival for New York City advertising firms from 1924 to 1996. We f...
Article
Although researchers often do it subconsciously, every explanation involves choosing a level of abstraction at which the argument proceeds. The dominant North American style of research in Organization Theory, Strategy, and International Business encourages researchers to frame their explanations at the highest level of abstraction where country le...
Article
Although researchers often do it subconsciously, every explanation involves choosing a level of abstraction at which the argument proceeds. The dominant North American style of research in Organization Theory, Strategy, and International Business encourages researchers to frame their explanations at the highest level of abstraction where country le...
Article
Do some top executives matter more than others? Integrating insights from upper echelons and executive mobility research, we suggest that the functional roles performed by top executives shape their value to the firm. We examine the effects of inter-firm executive mobility on firm survival for New York City advertising firms from 1924 to 1996. We f...
Article
The emergence of professional service industries often pose a challenge for Oliver Williamson’s transaction cost theory explanations. While professional tasks are ideal candidates for internalization due to high measuring and monitoring costs, they are frequently outsourced and become the impetus for the emergence of a nascent professional services...
Article
Full-text available
Building on recent research on dynamic, high-growth firms — so called “gazelles” — this paper explores a simple question that is important both in theoretical and practical terms: what is the fastest rate at which firms can grow. Based on a sample of seven high-growth firms (Cisco, G. M., I. B. M., Microsoft, Sears, Starbucks, and U. S. Steel), we...
Article
The paper presents a model that conceptualizes the development of academic disciplines and related industries as intimately linked. The model predicts that the relative strength of a national industry which has a significant input of science or engineering knowledge is causally related to the strength of the nation’s relevant science or engineering...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – This chapter is intended to encourage comparative-historical research in strategy by articulating a framework for the study of industry and firm evolution. Design/methodology/approach – Strategy research at its core tries to explain sustained performance differences among firms. This chapter argues that one, out of the many ways to create...
Article
Full-text available
Many scholars see entrepreneurs as action-oriented individuals who use rules of thumb and other mental heuristics to make decisions, but who do little systematic planning and analysis. We argue that what distinguishes successful from unsuccessful entrepreneurs is precisely that the former vary their decision-making styles, sometimes relying on heur...
Article
The goal of this paper is to review the ideas that have been developed to describe the emergence and change of structures in three fields: Economics, Management, and Design of Technologies. The paper focuses on one empirical setting, the economy, and more specifically how firms, industries, and technologies change over time. Today’s industrialized...
Article
Scholars have emphasized the gradual ownership transformation of enterprises as a key driver of the Chinese economy’s unprecedented growth. However, little work has been done on the issue of whether this transformation process takes place evenly across the various regions in China. This paper describes the important role of regional institutions in...
Article
As the rate of innovation increases, organizational environments are becoming faster and more complex, posing greater challenges for organizations to adapt. This study argues that the concept of coevolution offers a bridge between the prescient adaptationist and ex-post selectionist perspectives of organizational change to account for the increasin...
Article
Many scholars see entrepreneurs as action-oriented individuals who use rules of thumb and other mental heuristics to make decisions, but who do little systematic planning and analysis. We argue that what distinguishes successful from unsuccessful entrepreneurs is precisely that they vary their decision-making styles, sometimes relying on heuristics...
Article
Full-text available
We investigate what types of human capital are most valuable to professional service firms. Using the data from the New York City advertising industry from 1924-1996, we find that the departure of unheralded back office executives is more damaging than the departure of many prominent client-facing executives.
Article
In this paper, we study the evolution of one industry across six countries in which the competitive position of large national firms changed considerably during our one hundred year analysis period. Our results show that an unequal distribution of resources leads to alternative causal pathways to rise of large firms.
Article
Full-text available
Scholars have documented the importance of national-level factors for the competitive success of firms on a global scale. These studies typically identify multiple factors that are behind the emergence of large and successful firms in particular national clusters. However, there has been relatively little research identifying whether such factors a...
Article
The paper presents a strategy for designing relational databases with the program FileMaker to study the histories of individuals and organizations. The approach facilitates efficiency in entering data and flexibility for constructing statistical analyses from the raw data. The key feature of the strategy is to define the basic unit of observation...
Article
The paper presents a complete method for using automatic techniques to code printed text pages. It involves three automatic steps and one or two steps of manual corrections to obtain fully accurate results. We discovered that present-day consumer digital cameras are much better than high-end scanners to obtain pictures of printed pages quickly and...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of a dominant design has taken on a quasi-paradigmatic status in analyses of the link between technological and industrial dynamics. A review of the empirical literature reveals a variety of interpretations about some aspects of the phenomenon such as its underlying causal mechanisms and its level of analysis. To stimulate further progr...
Article
Full-text available
Our theory provides an unambiguous definition of dominant designs (stable core components that can be stable interfaces) and the inclusion of multiple levels of analysis (system, subsystems, components). We introduce the concept of an operational principle and offer a systematic definition of core and peripheral subsystems based on the concept of p...
Article
"Scientific management" is the label Frederick Taylor attached to the system of management devised by him. In this article we present our discovery of very different "scientific" management principles that were developed roughly concurrently with Taylorism by German physicist Ernst Abbe, then owner and managing director of the Carl Zeiss optical in...
Article
Full-text available
'Scientific management' is the label Frederick Taylor attached to the system of shop-floor management devised by him. In this article we present our discovery of very different 'scientific' management principles that, roughly concurrently with Taylorism, were developed by German physicist-turned-manager Ernst Abbe and that are codified in the statu...
Book
Full-text available
A comparison of the development of the synthetic dye industry in Great Britain, Germany, and the US. The rise of this industry constitutes an important chapter in business, economic, and technological history because synthetic dyes - invented in 1857 -represent the first time that a scientific discovery quickly gave rise to a new industry. British...
Article
Full-text available
Multimarket (or multipoint) contact has been shown to deter aggressive actions by rivals toward each other, producing a situation of mutual forbearance among firms. To create this deterrent capability, however, firms must enter each others’ markets, which is just the kind of action that the deterrent is supposed to limit. This study explores the qu...
Article
Full-text available
The beginning of a new millennium provides a welcome opportunity to take stock of the accomplishments, open questions, and most promising research avenues of evolutionary models in management and organization theory. Johann Peter Murmann has invited Howard Aldrich, Daniel Levinthal, and Sidney Winter to appraise the state of the art in evolutionary...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides a survey on studies that analyze the macroeconomic effects of intellectual property rights (IPR). The first part of this paper introduces different patent policy instruments and reviews their effects on R&D and economic growth. This part also discusses the distortionary effects and distributional consequences of IPR protection a...
Article
Full-text available
"Scientific management" is the label Frederick Taylor attached to the system of management devised by him. In this article we present our discovery of very different "scientific" management principles that were developed roughly concurrently with Taylorism by German physicist Ernst Abbe, then owner and managing director of the Carl Zeiss optical in...
Article
Full-text available
A historical perspective on how firms acquire, leverage, and protect technological competencies in different markets reveals that it is far from obvious that extensive patenting by firms will lead to long-term competitive success. German and Swiss firms in the early years of the synthetic dye industry created technological competencies that were su...
Article
Full-text available
A survey across space and time reveals that leading firms operating in global industries often cluster in one or a few countries. The paper argues that nations differ in how successful they are in a particular industry because coevolutionary processes linking a particular industry and national institutions powerfully shape the path of an industry.s...
Article
Full-text available
. Current models of industry evolution suggest that development patterns should be the same across different levels of analysis. In comparing the evolution of the synthetic dye industry at the global level and in the five major producer countries before World War I (Britain, Germany, France, Switzerland and the United States), it is shown that patt...
Article
Full-text available
Current models of industry evolution suggest that development patterns should be the same across different levels of analysis. In comparing the evolution of the synthetic dye industry at the global level and in the five major producer countries before World War I (Britain, Germany, France, Switzerland and the United States), it is shown that patter...
Article
Full-text available
It is London 1856. William Henry Perkin serendipitously invents the first synthetic dye while he is trying to synthesize quinine, a medicine for malaria. The nineteen-year-old Perkin leaves the Royal College of Chemistry and quickly commercializes his aniline purple dye, launching the synthetic dye industry. From that time on, the industry continue...
Article
The concept of dominant designs has been used in very different ways. Confusions exist over the concept, its underlying causal mechanisms, and its level of analysis. To remove these confusions, we draw on the history of technology and propose to conceptualize technologies as nested hierarchies of subsystems and components.
Article
The work on dominant designs and their linkage to organizational evolution was initiated by Abernathy (1978) and Abernathy and Utterback (1978). Over the past 20 years the concept has been used by a range of authors in a variety of ways. Confusion over the concept, its underlying causal mechanisms, and its level of analysis renders research in this...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores how multimarket theory challenges the normal assumptions of competition in individual markets. Using a sample of hospitals, the authors found that the degree to which competitors compete in similar markets has a negative effect on market exit. Organizations that contract for services and consequently face fewer internal barriers...

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