Jörg Fröbisch

Jörg Fröbisch
Museum für Naturkunde - Leibniz Institute for Research on Evolution and Biodiversity | MFN

Prof., PhD

About

146
Publications
42,644
Reads
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2,073
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - present
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Position
  • Professor for Paleobiology and Evolution
February 2009 - November 2010
Field Museum of Natural History
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2003 - August 2008
University of Toronto
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (146)
Article
Full-text available
The sternum is a stabilizing element in the axial skeleton of most tetrapods, closely linked with the function of the pectoral girdle of the appendicular skeleton. Modern mammals have a distinctive sternum characterized by multiple ossified segments, the origins of which are poorly understood. Although the evolution of the pectoral girdle has been...
Article
Full-text available
The richly fossiliferous deposits of the Brazilian Pedra de Fogo Formation originated in an extensive aquatic system in tropical Pangaea, and grade from marginal lacustrine into marine deposits at the depocenter in the western part of the Parnaíba Basin. In addition to the well-known tetrapod and macrofloral records from these deposits, the Pedra d...
Article
Full-text available
Turtles are a charismatic reptile group with a peculiar body plan, which most notably includes the shell. Anatomists have often focused descriptive efforts on the shell and other strongly derived body parts, such as the akinetic skull, or the cervical vertebrae. Other parts of turtle osteology, like the girdles, limbs, and mandibles, are documented...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Bromacker locality of central Germany (Tambach Formation, Cisuralian) is known since the late 19th century for its extraordinary fossil footprint content, especially with regards to abundance and preservation. The project “Opening science: new ways of knowledge transfer using the example of the research project Bromacker”, funded by the Federal...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Burrowing is one of the most widely distributed behaviors among extant terrestrial vertebrates, yielding several ecological benefits, such as providing microhabitats with stable environmental conditions for aestivation and breeding, or subterranean foraging. In the fossil record fossorial lifestyles are best documented by the presence of burrowing...
Article
A new species of the genus Belebey (Bolosauridae), Be. shumovi sp. nov., is described from the Upper Kazanian Substage (Guadalupian) of European Russia based on elements of the upper jaw, a maxilla and two premaxillae. This is the largest known bolosaurid, the skull length of which could be estimated to be around 160 mm. In addition to its overall...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Lower Permian of Central Europe is mainly recorded by continental, intramountain sediments, since it was positioned in the centre of the supercontinent Pangaea. Sand and siltstones of several fossil sites in the Tambach Formation contain a characteristic fauna and flora, indicating extreme environments caused by a continental nearequatorial cli...
Preprint
Full-text available
The development of the vertebral column has been studied extensively in modern amniotes, yet many aspects of its evolutionary history remain enigmatic. Here we expand the existing data on four major vertebral developmental patterns in amniotes based on exceptionally well-preserved specimens of the early Permian mesosaurid reptile Stereosternum: (i)...
Article
Full-text available
The early Permian Richards Spur locality of Oklahoma has produced abundant material of numerous terrestrial fossil tetrapods, including various “microsaurs,” several of which are considered to belong to the clade Recumbirostra. We present a new partial skull of the recumbirostran “microsaur” Nannaroter mckinziei ; through computed tomography (CT) a...
Article
Full-text available
The years 2020 and 2021 were marked worldwide by the corona pandemic with restrictions on fieldwork at home and abroad, with limited personal communication and restricted access to fossil and rock collections. Still, remarkable progress has been made by the international team of our working group as shown below by a number of publications, the part...
Article
Full-text available
The origin of Reptilia and the biostratigraphic and palaeobiogeographic distribution of its early representatives are still poorly understood. An independent source of information may come from the extensive Carboniferous footprint record of reptiles, which is arguably richer and more complete than the skeletal record. Nevertheless, previous studie...
Article
Full-text available
The cynodont fauna of the Trirachodon-Kannemeyeria Subzone of the Middle Triassic Cynognathus Assemblage Zone (AZ) is almost exclusively represented by taxa belonging to the clade Eucynodontia. However, there is one basal (non-eucynodont) cynodont known to have survived into this assemblage: the enigmatic Bolotridon frerensis . BSPG 1934-VIII-7 rep...
Article
Recently collected temnospondyl fossils from the Cisuralian Pedra de Fogo Formation (north-eastern Brazil) indicate a diverse assemblage of aquatic tetrapods, including the dvinosaurs Timonya anneae and Procuhy nazariensis. Here we present revised diagnoses for these species and detailed descriptions of their holotypes. Timonya anneae is distinguis...
Article
A new parareptile from the Cisuralian Pedra de Fogo Formation of north-eastern Brazil is described. Karutia fortunata gen. et sp. nov. is the first Gondwanan member of Acleistorhinidae, a clade previously known only from North America but thought to be closely related to the Russian Lanthanosuchidae. A re-examination of parareptile phylogeny indica...
Article
Full-text available
Nonmammalian cynodonts represent a speciose and ecologically diverse group with a fossil record stretching from the late Permian until the Cretaceous. Because of their role as major components of Triassic terrestrial ecosystems and as the direct ancestors of mammals, cynodonts are an important group for understanding Mesozoic tetrapod diversity. We...
Article
Full-text available
The early Permian mesosaurs were the first amniotes to re-invade aquatic environments. One of their most controversial and puzzling features is their distinctive caudal anatomy, which has been suggested as a mechanism to facilitate caudal autotomy. Several researchers have described putative fracture planes in mesosaur caudal vertebrae — unossified...
Article
Full-text available
The Pedra de Fogo Formation in the Parnaíba Basin of northeastern Brazil hosts a recently discovered lacustrine fauna and provides the only known record of the Captorhinidae in South America. Here, new captorhinid remains from this unit are described. Two partial mandibles, including one formerly ascribed to the genus Captorhinus, are here referred...
Article
Full-text available
Therocephalia is one of the major therapsid clades and ranges from the middle Permian to Middle Triassic. The earliest therocephalians were large-bodied predators whose fossils are common in middle Permian rocks of South Africa, but have received little study. Here we present a redescription of the skull of the early therocephalian Lycosuchus based...
Article
Full-text available
The cave deposits of the Lower Permian Richards Spur locality in Oklahoma, USA, have produced an incredible number of terrestrial tetrapod taxa, many of which are currently only known from this locality. One of the many recent taxa to be described from the locality was the small lanthanosuchoid parareptile Feeserpeton oklahomensis. Represented by a...
Article
Full-text available
Histology and microanatomy of vertebrae, ribs, haemal arch, and humeri and femora of 10 individuals of Stereosternum and two dorsal ribs of 1 individual of Brazilosaurus were studied. All individuals had achieved a body length of 50 cm (equal to 65 % of the maximum known body length) or larger. All sampled bones are highly osteosclerotic due to the...
Article
An isolated dorsal osteoderm of a chroniosuchian from a late Permian fissure filling in the lower Zechstein (Z1) of central Germany represents the first Permian-age record of this enigmatic tetrapod clade outside Russia and China. Based on a number of features, the specimen is designated the holotype of a new taxon, Hassiacoscutum munki, and referr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Body size is one of the most crucial biological properties for both extant and extinct organisms as it influences the ecology, metabolism, reproduction rate, life span, growth rate fecundity and several other physiological aspects. Taking into account the strong relationship between these aspects and body mass, the quantitative analysis of body siz...
Article
Full-text available
Mass extinctions have the potential to substantially alter the evolutionary trends in a clade. If new regions of ecospace are made available, the clade may radiate. If, on the other hand, the clade passes through an evolutionary “bottleneck” by substantially reducing its species richness, then subsequent radiations may be restricted in the disparit...
Article
The amniote clade Parareptilia is notable in that members of the clade exhibited a wide array of morphologies, were successful in a variety of ecological niches and survived the end-Permian mass extinction. In order to better understand how mass extinction events can affect clades that survive them, we investigate both the species richness and morp...
Article
Full-text available
The Carboniferous and Permian were crucial intervals in the establishment of terrestrial ecosystems, which occurred alongside substantial environmental and climate changes throughout the globe, as well as the final assembly of the supercontinent of Pangaea. The influence of these changes on tetrapod biogeography is highly contentious, with some aut...
Article
Nonmammalian cynodonts represent a speciose and ecologically diverse group with a fossil record stretching from the late Permian until the Cretaceous. Because of their role as major components of Triassic terrestrial ecosystems and as the direct ancestors of mammals, cynodonts are an important group for understanding Mesozoic tetrapod diversity. We...
Article
Full-text available
Gorgonopsia is one of the major clades of non-mammalian synapsids, and includes an array of large-bodied carnivores that were the top terrestrial predators of the late Permian. Most research on the clade has focused on these largest members; small-bodied gorgonopsians are relatively little-studied. Here, we redescribe a small gorgonopsian skull (MB...
Data
Strict consensus tree of gorgonopsian phylogenetic analysis, only MB.R.999 and no other referred specimens of Cynariops robustus coded. Numbers left under nodes indicate bootstrapping support values above 50%. Numbers right under nodes show Bremer support indices. (TIF)
Data
Label of MB.R.999. Photocopy of the label for specimen MB.R.999 in the collections of the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. (PDF)
Data
Data matrix of this study for both MB.R.999 and a composite coding of other referred specimens of Cynariops robustus, available in NEXUS format. (NEX)
Data
Strict consensus tree of gorgonopsian phylogenetic analysis, MB.R.999 and referred specimens of Cynariops robustus coded as separate OTUs. Numbers left under nodes indicate bootstrapping support values above 50%. Numbers right under nodes show Bremer support indices. (TIF)
Data
CC BY Permit of Carola Radke, Mfn. For reprint [22] and use of Figs 1–3 under a CC BY license, original copyright 2016 (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Studies of diversity, whether of species richness within regions (alpha diversity) or faunal turnover between regions (beta diversity), will depend heavily on the "bioregions" into which a study area is divided. However, such studies in the palaeontological literature have often been extremely arbitrary in their definition of bioregions and have em...
Article
Full-text available
Milosaurus mccordi was described in 1970 as a large, pelycosaurian-grade synapsid from the latest Carboniferous of Illinois but has since received little attention. Here, the holotype and referred material of Milosaurus are reexamined and incorporated into a phylogenetic analysis. Milosaurus is resolved within Haptodontiformes, sharing with this cl...
Article
Full-text available
The early amniote clade Mesosauridae has long been of interest to scientists, primarily due to the members of the clade being the oldest secondarily aquatic tetrapods and their role as a line of evidence for continental drift. In the landmark phylogenetic analysis of Parareptilia by Gauthier and colleagues in 1988, Mesosauridae was found to be the...
Article
Full-text available
Although Permian fossils have been known from the Parnaíba Basin for two centuries, and some faunal and flora elements are well known worldwide, research on the fossil assemblages from this basin has lagged relative to other, more accessible basins. In the last decade, however, there has been a significant increase in the study of fossils from the...
Article
Full-text available
1.Beta diversity is a measure of the taxonomic differentiation between habitats/localities within an assemblage, and is normally calculated as a set of pairwise taxonomic “distances” between the localities. 2.Due to the incomplete sampling, beta diversity estimates for fossil assemblages will always be higher than the true value. However, the diffe...
Article
Full-text available
The semicircular canal (SC) system of the inner ear detects head angular accelerations and is essential for navigation and spatial awareness in vertebrates. Because the bony labyrinth encloses the membranous labyrinth SCs, it can be used as a proxy for animal behavior. The bony labyrinth of dicynodonts, a clade of herbivorous non-mammalian synapsid...
Data
Stereolitograph file of the MTA/ACL001 inner ear. (STL)
Data
Linear measurements and respective summary statistics calculations. (XLSX)
Data
Angular measurements and respective summary statistics calculations. (XLSX)
Data
Extant mammal and Endothiodon SC minor and major axis measurements, eccentricity calculations, body mass estimates and linear regression calculations and respective statistics. (XLSX)
Data
Stereolitograph file of the MTA/ACL003 inner ear. (STL)
Data
History of Karoo vertebrate collection in Mozambique and AMNH6156 ascription to Endothiodon. The various important moments of Mozambican Karoo vertebrate paleontology are outlined starting 1949 with Domingos da Rocha to the 1980’s by Brigadas de Cartografia Geológica da Bacia carbonífera de Metangula. (DOCX)
Data
Stereolitograph file of the MTA/ACL002 inner ear. (STL)
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between diversity and disparity during the evolutionary history of a clade provides unique insights into evolutionary radiations and the biological response to bottlenecks and to extinctions. Here we present the first comprehensive comparison of diversity and disparity of captorhinids, a group of basal amniotes that is important fo...
Article
Full-text available
The postcranial material referable to the Russian caseid Ennatosaurus tecton from the middle Permian is described. Although the cranium has been recently restudied in detail, the descriptions currently available for the postcranial skeleton are essentially limited to the original short account on the holotype provided by Efremov in 1956. The postcr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Russian caseid Ennatosaurus tecton (Synapsida Caseasauria) is an important member of the group, being among the few “pelycosaurs” occurring in the Middle Permian, thus making caseids among the longest-surviving groups of non-therapsid synapsids. Although the cranial skeleton has been recently restudied in detail, the descriptions currently avai...
Article
Full-text available
Synapsida, the clade including therapsids and thus also mammals, is one of the two major branches of amniotes. Organismal design, with modularity as a concept, offers insights into the evolution of therapsids, a group that experienced profound anatomical transformations throughout the past 270 Ma, eventually leading to the evolution of the mammalia...