Joel Vos

Joel Vos
Metanoia Institute · Research

PhD

About

46
Publications
21,475
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987
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Introduction
Current main projects The psychological impact of COVID-19; The psychological impact of Brexit; The effectiveness of Transactional Analysis; The economics of meaning in life; The effectiveness of meaning-oriented practices.

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Aims This study describes the outcomes of clients treated by therapists in their first placement who were undergoing training in a range of humanistic and other relational approaches: Transactional Analysis, Gestalt, Integrative, Humanistic, Person Centred and Counselling Psychology. Method All clients seen by 179 trainee therapists over a 2-year...
Article
Objectives Previous studies have shown that psychological stress and mental health problems increase the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, such as heart attack or stroke. Furthermore, after CVD events, the majority of patients report large stress. However, psychological treatments have only modest effects in CVD patients. Therefore, it...
Article
Since the creation of transactional analysis (TA) in the 1950s, almost 50,000 handbooks, theoretical articles, and personal perspectives have been published about it. However, the application of TA has not been systematically studied. The research described in this article involved an online survey titled the Transactional Analysis Review Survey (T...
Article
Since the founding of transactional analysis (TA) by Eric Berne in the 1950s, many psychometric instruments have been developed to operationalize TA concepts. Several studies have provided general reviews of these, but the studies are not systematic and do not assess the psychometric quality of the instruments. We conducted a systematic literature...
Article
Structural Pragmatic Phenomenological Analysis (SPPA) is a pragmatic‐phenomenological methodology integrating qualitative and quantitative research, offering a systematic, sensitive and specific guidance to developing a reflexive understanding of individual experiences and meanings. Applications of SPPA have previously been published, but no system...
Chapter
The existential‐phenomenological approach has steadily grown and developed, and is now, more than ever, widely acknowledged as a powerful method of engaging with problems in living. Coming with its increasing popularity, a challenge for the integrity of existential therapy is to ensure that therapeutic practice remains anchored in the owned dialogi...
Article
This chapter is based on pluralistic epistemology, as pluralism focuses on the existence of different co‐existing perspectives and their relationships. It provides an overview of research findings on Existential‐Phenomenological Therapies. Correia et al. found that existential therapists used four – sometimes overlapping – therapeutic competences:...
Article
Objective Many psychotherapists speak with clients about meaning in life. Meaning is an neutral evidence-based term for a subjective sense of purpose, values, understanding, self-worth, action-directed goals, and self-regulation. Since little is known about its effectiveness, our study aimed to determine the effects of meaning-centered therapies (M...
Article
Background Meaning‐centered group psychotherapy for cancer survivors (MCGP‐CS) improves meaning, psychological well‐being, and mental adjustment to cancer and reduces psychological distress. This randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the cost‐utility of MCGP‐CS compared to supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) and care‐as‐usual (C...
Article
Full-text available
What is meaningful in life? This is a question many individuals ask at least once in their lifetime. Many researchers have also asked this question, and a large body of literature seems to answer in theoretical and academic terms. But what is the meaning of meaning in clinical practice? That is, what is the role of meaning in psychotherapy, recover...
Article
Background: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for cancer survivors (MCGP-CS) to improve personal meaning, compared with supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) and care as usual (CAU). Method: A total of 170 cancer survivors were randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: MCGP-CS (n = 57...
Article
Objective: Existential anxiety (EA) is a construct that refers to fears that are provoked by core threats of human existence, such as death, meaninglessness, and fundamental loneliness. The objective of this study was to develop an EA measure that can be used in research and clinical practice. Method: The Existential Concerns Questionnaire (ECQ)...
Chapter
More than 30 % of the population lives with a chronic or life-threatening physical disease. Of these individuals, 40 % also experience mental health problems and stress which exacerbate physical problems and health-care costs. More specifically, one third report pathological levels of anxiety and depression, and a majority mention stress as arising...
Chapter
In the past, when individuals had questions about meaning in life, they turned to their tribe, religion or philosophy, but nowadays many see therapists. This chapter systematically reviews the evidence base for meaning-centred therapy (MCT). Thirty different MCT schools can be identified, including logotherapy, existential analysis and meaning-cent...
Conference Paper
Relevance of the workshop to counselling and psychotherapy research: This workshop explores the practical implications of findings that psychotherapy works optimally when it is personalized (e.g. Norcross & Wampold, 2011; Horvarth et al., 2011). In particular, the workshop focuses on pluralistic therapy, which aims to achieve personalization throu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
RATIONALE: Psychotherapeutic process research has consistently demonstrated a relationship between therapeutic outcomes and the extent to which therapists collaborate with the client in tailoring the therapy. One form of collaborative tailoring is therapist and client discussion of the client’s preferred therapeutic methods or activities for workin...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To review the evidence on the efficacy of different types of existential therapies: a family of psychological interventions that draw on themes from existential philosophy to help clients address such issues in their lives as meaning and death anxiety. Method: Relevant electronic databases, journals, and reference lists were searched...
Article
Objective: Many cancer patients report changes in how they experience meaning in life and being confronted with life's limitations, understanding themselves as being vulnerable, finite, and free beings. Many would like to receive psychotherapeutic help for this. However, psychotherapy for these concerns often either focuses primarily on meaning in...
Article
Full-text available
Existential anxiety (EA) is an expression of being occupied with ultimate concerns such as death, meaninglessness, and fundamental loneliness. Philosophers and psychologists have claimed its importance for the study of human thinking, emotion, decision making, and psychopathology. Until now research has mainly focused on death anxiety. Several deat...
Article
Full-text available
Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors (MCGP-CS) was designed to help patients to sustain or enhance a sens...
Article
Full-text available
Confrontation with a life-threatening disease like cancer can evoke existential distress, which can trigger a search for meaning in people after having survived this disease. In an effort to gain more insight in the meaning making process, we conducted four focus groups with 23 cancer survivors on this topic. Participants responded to questions abo...
Article
Many cancer-patients undergo DNA testing in the BRCA1/2 genes to receive information about the likelihood that cancer is heritable. Previous nonsystematic studies suggested that DNA testing often does not fulfill the counselees' needs for certainty. We explored the balance between the counselees' need for certainty and perceived certainty (NfC-PC,...
Article
Background: Several studies have shown that counselees do not experience psychopathological levels of distress after DNA test result disclosure. However, it has not systematically been studied whether the absence of psychopathology also means that counselees do not want to receive help. Their self-reported request for help may be related not only...
Article
The objectives of the present study were to (1) evaluate whether social and personal resources were independently related to psychological distress and (2) examine the interrelationships of social and personal resources in women at risk for hereditary breast cancer. General and breast cancer specific distress, family communication regarding heredit...
Article
It has been hypothesized that the Outcomes of DNA testing (O) are better predicted and/or mediated by the counselees' Perception P) than by the actually communicated genetic Information (I). In this study, we aimed at quantifying the effect that perception has in genetic counseling for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. Two hundred and four women, w...
Article
Clarification of the role of several aspects of self-concept regarding psychological distress in women at risk of hereditary breast cancer will help to target counselling and psychosocial interventions more appropriately. In this study, we aimed (1) to examine the role of general self-esteem and specific aspects of self-concept (i.e. stigma, vulner...
Article
Genetic counseling may help counselees understand their genetic risk of developing breast/ovarian cancer. However, many studies have shown that their perception of their risks is inaccurate. Information-oriented variables often predicted the level of accuracy, focusing on specific processes of receiving and processing risks. We examined counselee-o...
Article
Previous studies suggest that learning a DNA-test-result has no direct impact on the medical-decisions and psychological well-being of counselees. Their perception, especially their recollections and interpretations of their cancer-risks and heredity, predict and/or mediate this impact. These studies were criticized for their small range of predict...
Article
Full-text available
Objective of this paper is to study how DNA-test result information was communicated and perceived within families. A retrospective descriptive study in 13 probands with a BRCA1/2 unclassified variant, 7 with a pathogenic mutation, 5 with an uninformative result, and in 44, 14, and 12 of their 1st and 2nd degree relatives respectively. We examined...
Article
Previous studies on the counsellees' perception of DNA test results did not clarify whether counsellees were asked about their recollections or interpretations, and focused only on patients' own risks and not on the likelihood that cancer is heritable in the family. We tested differences and correlations of four perception aspects: recollections an...
Article
Background: Unclassified variant and uninformative BRCA1/2 results are not only relevant for probands to whom results are disclosed but also for untested relatives. Previous studies have seldom included relatives and have not explained how their lives were influenced by these results. We explored the family communication timeline of genetic counse...
Article
Women from families in which many individuals have developed breast and/or ovarian cancer may request for DNA-testing. A DNA-test result may disclose their own risks to develop cancer (again), their relatives’ risks and subsequent options for medical surveillance. This thesis describes several multicenter studies in the Netherlands about the psycho...
Article
Effective communication of DNA-test results requires a sound terminology. However, the variety of terms in literature for DNA-test results other than pathogenic, may create inconsistencies between professionals, and misunderstanding in patients. Therefore, we conducted a theoretical and empirical analysis of the terms most frequently used in articl...
Article
Unclassified variants (UVs, variants of uncertain clinical significance) are found in 13% of all BRCA1/2 mutation analyses. Little is known about the counsellees' recall and interpretation of a UV, and its psychosocial/medical impact. Retrospective semi-structured interviews with open questions and five-point Likert scales were carried out in 24 co...
Article
To explore the percentage of patients who report a reduced impact of migraine on their life, and to which factors this improvement can be attributed. Four hundred forty-eight members of the Dutch Society of Headache Patients answered a set of structured questionnaires, including the Migraine-Specific Quality of Life instrument (MSQOL). Of this grou...

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