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Jodie-Lee Trembath

Jodie-Lee Trembath
Australian Academy of the Humanities · A New Approach: championing effective investment and return in Australian arts and culture.

B.A./B.Ed; Master of Communication; Grad Cert in Social Research Methods; PhD (Anthropology)

About

12
Publications
6,857
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94
Citations
Introduction
Jodie-Lee Trembath is the Research Project Manager at think tank A New Approach, which is affiliated with the Australian Academy of the Humanities. She completed her PhD in the Department of Anthropology at the Australian National University in 2019. Jodie-Lee's broad research interests include higher education and globalisation, the management of chronic pain from a clinical perspective, and the health and wellbeing impacts of arts and culture. She is also the Managing Editor of the Anthropology podcast and blog The Familiar Strange, which can be found at www.thefamiliarstrange.com or on your favourite podcast app.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide clarity around the notion of the expatriate academic (EA), a construct that is increasingly essential to theories of expatriate management and higher education management. A review of the literature on academic mobility showed that terms such as “international academic” and “foreign faculty” provide...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While there is a growing interest in expatriate academics, their specific role as teachers with daily contact to local students seems to have been ignored when examining their adjustment and work outcomes. Here, we focus on how teacher-student relations affect expatriate academics' job performance and job satisfaction. Moreover, we study the modera...
Article
Research on Perceived Organisational Support (POS) rarely focuses on the potential gap between employee perceptions versus the support the organisation purports to offer. An understanding of this may provide greater insight into the interventions a university should be making if it hopes to improve retention of its expatriate academics. By analysin...
Thesis
As neoliberal logics converge with the internationalisation imperative on university campuses worldwide, the nature of what it means to be an academic is changing. In an era when tenured stability in one's home country has become, for many, an unlikely dream, academics are experiencing an increasing need to be globally mobile, while many university...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the notion of the human-technology hybrid, seeking to understand how ‘smart’ technologies are enmeshed with humans in their fleshier forms to assemble different identities from moment to moment. One participant - the Director of Research Training (DRT) at a high-ranking research-intensive university - was shadowed as she interac...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose While there is a growing interest in expatriate academics, their specific role as teachers with daily contact to local students seems to have been largely ignored when examining their adjustment and work outcomes. Based on the job demands-resources model the authors predict that good teacher-student relations, as a supportive job resource,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper reports the findings of a pilot study, undertaken to experiment with the combined use of shadowing as a method and Actor-Network Theory as a philosophy, within the context of the Research Training Division of a research-intensive university. One participant - the Director of Research Training (DRT) - was shadowed as she interacted with t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper offers a critical, systematic review of the literature on the professional experiences of expatriate academics published since the year 2000. It provides both thematic analysis and assessment of research quality in an attempt to draw conclusions about the current state and future directions of this steadily growing field. Universities ar...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Around the world, universities are scrambling to give their strategic plans an international focus, citing curricula that are more inclusive, more multicultural, more globalised, more culturally sensitive, and provides more opportunities for students to engage with an international community. This includes the Australian tertiary public relations s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents an insight into the activities and interests of expatriates living in Vietnam with a view to developing apposite marketing and consumer behaviour insights. A content analysis and subsequent discourse analysis were conducted on a popular magazine targeting this group. Thirty-three categories of interests based on our original lit...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
My doctoral research explored the changes to academic labour catalysed by an increased focus on neoliberal logics, at an international branch campus of a Western university in Vietnam. I started off looking specifically at invisible work - that is, the work that is not accounted for in job descriptions or performance plans but is nonetheless essential to an employee achieving their appointed tasks - of academics, and questioned whether this invisible work was changing the nature of academic labour when academics cross national borders for work. While I found this to be true, the more important finding was the highly VISIBLE work of marketing the university that had become essential to academics' job descriptions and day to day work lives. This had not only changed the nature of academic labour, but had also created a new, implicit mission for the university: not just there to provide education and do research because knowledge creation is an inherent good; not just there to prepare students for the future of work; and not just there to make the world a better place. Instead, the fundamental, overarching goal of this university seemed to have become to maintain the university's existence. Why? Because if they didn't work to maintain the university's existence, then the university would cease to exist. The meaning and purpose behind tertiary education and scholarly pursuits had become secondary to the need to market the university and increase monetary inputs. This, in turn, had even greater effects on how academics were expected to behave, and how they internalised these changes.