Jodi Brandt

Jodi Brandt
Boise State University | BSU · Human-Environment Systems

PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison

About

57
Publications
35,271
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,490
Citations
Introduction
Jodi Brandt currently works at the Human-Environment Systems Center, Boise State University. She leads LUL@BSU - the Land Use Lab at Boise State University. Check out her full website here: https://cid.boisestate.edu/hes/person/jodi-brandt/
Additional affiliations
November 2012 - December 2013
University of Michigan
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • NSF Central African Forests and Institutions Postdoctoral Fellow

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Predicting forest recovery at landscape scales will aid forest restoration efforts. The first step in successful forest recovery is tree recruitment. Forecasts of tree recruit abundance, derived from the landscape‐scale distribution of seed sources (i.e. adult trees), could assist efforts to identify sites with high potential for natural regenerati...
Article
Full-text available
The degree of coupling between the social and ecological components of social-ecological systems is seen as fundamental to understanding their functioning, interactions and trajectories. Yet, there is limited work about how to empirically understand the degree of coupling between social and ecological systems, nor the processes by which the degree...
Article
Full-text available
Detecting newly established invasive plants is key to prevent further spread. Traditional field surveys are challenging and often insufficient to identify the presence and extent of invasions. This is particularly true for wetland ecosystems because of difficult access, and because floating and submergent plants may go undetected in the understory...
Article
Full-text available
Roads are proliferating worldwide at an unprecedented rate, with potentially severe impacts on wildlife. We calculated the extent and potential impacts of road networks across the 1,160,000-km 2 , 13-country range of the globally endangered tiger (Panthera tigris)-a conservation umbrella species. We found that roads were pervasive, totaling 134,000...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation easements are the fastest growing private conservation strategy in the United States. However, mechanisms to assess private land conservation as well as their support by the general public are not well understood. This study uses the ecosystem services framework for assessing existing private lands in Idaho and identifies areas for fut...
Poster
Full-text available
The benefits that humans obtain from ecosystems support their survival and well-being. Informing of ecosystems' capacity to supply ecosystem services (ES) represents a major challenge because of the inability of researchers to communicate the implications of environmental change in a way that is understood by a broad cross-section of society (i.e.,...
Article
Full-text available
Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) is a climate change mitigation policy in which rich countries provide payments to developing countries for protecting their forests. In 2009, the countries of Norway and Guyana entered into one of the first bilateral REDD+ programs, with Norway offering to pay US$250 million to Gu...
Article
Full-text available
The American West exists in the popular imagination as a distinct region, and policies and politics often suggest that both the challenges and the opportunities for land management and human well-being across the region are relatively homogeneous. In this paper, we argue that there are key characteristics that define the West as a social-ecological...
Article
Ecotourism is developing rapidly in biodiversity hotspots worldwide, but there is limited and mixed empirical evidence that ecotourism achieves positive biodiversity outcomes. We assessed whether ecotourism influenced forest loss rates and trajectories from 2000 ‐ 2017 in Himalayan temperate forests. We compared forest loss in 15 ecotourism hubs wi...
Article
Full-text available
A projected 60% of the world's population will live in urban areas by 2030. Urbanization has major impacts on ecosystem services, and therefore human well-being, but not all groups within a community experience the impacts of urbanization on ecosystem services the same. It is important for decision-makers to understand the trade-offs that occur wit...
Article
Full-text available
Land use decisions induce legacies that affect the welfare of future generations. Here, we present a spatial modeling approach for quantifying how past land use decisions influence provision of multiple ecosystem services based on different land use trajectories. We modeled the effect of past land use changes on water regulation, soil protection an...
Article
Full-text available
Hydrologic scientists and water resource managers often focus on different facets of flow regimes in changing climates. The objective of this work is to examine potential hydrological changes in the Upper Boise River Basin, Idaho, USA in the context of biophysical variables and their impacts a key variable governing administration of water resource...
Preprint
Climate change directly affects the hydrologic cycle in mountainous watersheds, which has consequences for downstream users. Improved water projections under diverse potential climate futures are critical to improving water security and management in these watersheds. The hydrologic science researchers and water resource managers, however, often fo...
Article
Full-text available
Facing the challenges of environmental and social changes, sustainable management of ecosystem services is a worldwide priority. The Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) approach provides a unique opportunity for promoting transdisciplinary place-based comparative research for social-ecological systems (SES) management. As part of the P...
Article
The outcomes of forest management (FM) as implemented by industrial logging corporations in tropical forests is an issue that merits greater scrutiny than it has received thus far. We, therefore, welcome the contribution by Karsenty et al. (2017) that questions some of the findings advanced in our article (Brandt et al., 2016). Our paper used satel...
Article
Ecotourism is growing rapidly in biodiversity hotspots because of its promise to achieve both economic growth and environmental conservation. We reviewed the literature for empirical evidence that ecotourism protects forests. Our conclusions are at once both sobering and encouraging. Ecotourism, as it is typically practiced, leads to deforestation....
Article
Full-text available
Globally, environmental and social change in water-scarce regions challenge the sustainability of social-ecological systems. WaterSES, a sponsored working group within the Program for Ecosystem Change and Society, explores and compares the social-ecological dynamics related to water scarcity across placed-based international research sites with con...
Poster
Full-text available
Sustainable management of ecosystem services (ES) is a worldwide priority, especially in regions experiencing water scarcity and governance issues. ES are particular susceptible to landscape changes such as agricultural expansion or urbanization, but also by watershed decisions that prioritize water supplies for human needs. Here, as part of the PE...
Article
Full-text available
In light of the ongoing environmental impacts of agriculture, understanding farmer adoption of sustainable management practices (SMPs) is an important priority. Relatively little work in agricultural adoption has explicitly examined the multilevel dynamics of adoption decision-making. Yet because many SMPs involve cooperative dilemmas—they are indi...
Poster
Full-text available
The Program for Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) provides a unique opportunity for promoting transdisciplinary placed-based comparative research for social-ecological systems (SES) management. As part of the PECS project “water scarcity and governance across social-ecological systems, WaterSES”, we used four place-based SES research sites to ana...
Article
Full-text available
Between 1900 and 2010, the global volume of natural resources used in buildings and transport infrastructure increased 23-fold (1). Sand and gravel are the largest portion of these primary material inputs (79% or 28.6 gigatons per year in 2010) and are the most extracted group of materials worldwide, exceeding fossil fuels and biomass (2). In most...
Article
Full-text available
The ecological impacts of invasive plants increase dramatically with time since invasion. Targeting young populations for treatment is therefore an economically and ecologically effective management approach, especially when linked to post-treatment monitoring to evaluate the efficacy of management. However, collecting detailed field-based post-tre...
Poster
Full-text available
The PECS-WaterSES compares the social-ecological dynamics causing and caused by water scarcity and governance across international research sites with conflicting local and regional water needs and governance, including arid southern Spain, the south-central Great Plains of Oklahoma (US), and the Portneuf and Treasure Valleys, Idaho (US). WaterSES...
Article
Globally, deforestation continues, and while protected areas are effective at protecting forests, the majority of forests are not in protected areas. This raises the question how effective are different management regimes to avoid deforestation in non-protected forests. Our objective was to assess the ability of different national-level forest mana...
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Data
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Poster
Full-text available
In the first 40 years of the 21st century, planet Earth is highly likely to experience more urban land expansion than in all of history, an increase in transportation infrastructure by more than a third, and a great variety of land reclamation projects. While scientists are beginning to quantify the deep imprint of human infrastructure on biodivers...
Technical Report
A dataset of 3,250,404 measurements, collated from 26,114 sampling locations in 94 countries and representing 47,044 species. The data were collated from 480 existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database was assemb...
Conference Paper
Telecouplings are socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances. Sand is mined worldwide for many uses and accounts for the largest volume of solid material extracted globally, making sand mining and trade an important telecoupling. Sand is extracted at a rate far greater than its renewal and is therefore a limited resource. Historica...
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
Himalayan forests are undergoing rapid changes due to population growth and economic development and their associated bird communities are among the most threatened and least-studied on earth. In the Chinese Himalaya, traditionally managed Tibetan sacred forests are keystone structures for forest bird conservation. Yet, it remains unclear which fin...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forest change is driven by demand in distant markets. Equally, investments in tropical forest landscapes by capital originating from distant emerging economies are on the rise. Understanding how forest outcomes vary by investment source is therefore becoming increasingly important. We empirically evaluate the relationship between investmen...
Article
Full-text available
The Tibetan Plateau has experienced rapid warming like most other alpine regions. Regional assessments show rates of warming comparable with the arctic region and decreasing Asian summer monsoons. We used meteorological station daily precipitation and daily maximum and minimum temperature data from 80 stations in the eastern Tibetan Plateau of sout...
Article
Identifying and protecting "keystone structures" is essential to maintain biodiversity in an increasingly human-dominated world. Sacred forests, i.e. natural areas protected by local people for cultural or religious regions, may be keystone structures for forest birds in the Greater Himalayas, but there is limited understanding of their use by bird...
Book
Full-text available
This is an electronic version of the Birds of Shangrila. Please use Adobe Reader for best results. With Adobe reader, you will hear the audio recordings, including bird songs, poems, folk tales, and bird names in Tibetan, Chinese and English. Other pdf readers may lose the audio functionality.
Article
Regional land-cover change affects biodiversity, hydrology, and biogeochemical cycles at local, watershed, and landscape scales. Developing countries are experiencing rapid land cover change, but assessment is often restricted by limited financial resources, accessibility, and historical data. The assessment of regional land cover patterns is often...
Article
Thesis research directed by: Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences. Title from t.p. of PDF. Thesis (M.S.) -- University of Maryland, College Park, 2004. Includes bibliographical references. Text.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Over the last two decades, the global conservation community has responded to the large scale destruction of ecosystems through different interventions intended to halt and reverse this destruction. We are at a pivotal point in time to evaluate these interventions, and quantify their effectiveness against their intended goals. Assessment of the different interventions trialed over the last two decades will guide policymakers and practitioners as they prepare to launch post-2020 conservation and climate mitigation interventions.
Project
Our objective is to create models that can incorporate landscape factors to describe and predict successional patterns in cattle pastures of Latin America. We will combine remotely sensed data and forest inventory plot data to develop a quantitative framework for forest regrowth in Panama’s Azuero Peninsula.
Project
Develop and refine a theory of the emergence and persistence of sustainable behaviors, institutions and societies that uses the evolutionary research on culture and cooperation. Test and refine that theory with varied case studies from different social-ecological contexts. Find ways the results can improve the application of sustainability interventions in diverse contexts worldwide.