Jocelyn M Woods

Jocelyn M Woods
University of Wisconsin–Madison | UW · Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences

Bachelor of Science

About

12
Publications
1,951
Reads
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18
Citations
Introduction
I am a Ph.D. student in the Animal Sciences department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I am assessing the impact of tail docking on the sociality, health, and welfare of sheep. I am trained in psychology and biology with an extensive history working in zoos & aquariums. My research interests are based on behavior and cognition, particularly as they apply to the welfare of captive animals. I have experience designing, analyzing, presenting, and writing original research projects.
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
Chicago Zoological Society
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2018 - September 2018
Evanston District 65
Position
  • Substitute Teacher
May 2017 - September 2018
Lincoln Park Zoo
Position
  • Primate Behavior Research Intern
Education
September 2014 - June 2016
DePaul University
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2012 - May 2014
Waubonsee Community College
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
The effect that visitors have on the behavior and welfare of animals is a widely-studied topic in zoo animal welfare. Typically, these studies focus on how the presence or activity levels of visitors affect animals. However, for many species, and particularly primates, social factors, such as social rank, can also have a large impact on behavior. H...
Article
Environmental enrichment is an important tool utilized to improve animal welfare in zoological institutions through opportunity for mental and physical stimulation. Many past studies have focused on the impact enrichment has on animal behavior; however, none have conducted preference assessments on enrichment items to examine the relationship betwe...
Poster
Full-text available
Automated tracking is increasingly used to monitor the health, behavior, and welfare of captive animals in laboratories, farms, zoos, and sanctuaries. Spatial data obtained from radio frequency technologies can provide information about an animals’ space use, location, and proximity to other individuals. Ultra-Wide Band is a newer radio frequency t...
Article
Full-text available
Animal welfare is a priority across accredited zoological institutions; however, historically, research has been prioritized for mammals. Bird-focused studies accounted for less than 10% of welfare research in zoos and aquariums over the last ten years. Due to the lack of scientific publications on bird welfare, zoo scientists and animal practition...
Article
Full-text available
The effect visitors may have on the welfare of professionally managed animals is vital to consider. The present study utilized an experimental approach to examine how 360° visitor viewing access (i.e., viewing from all sides of the habitat) impacts the behavior and physiology of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla, N = 7). Data collec...
Presentation
Full-text available
Aggressive interaction is a fundamental property of nonhuman primate social behavior in wild and professionally managed populations. The form, severity, and direction of aggression can vary depending on context and species. In zoo populations, high rates and severe aggression can cause concern for animal health and welfare. In the present study, we...
Presentation
There are numerous studies on environmental enrichment examining its use as a tool to improve animal welfare. However, no past research has examined the relationship between enrichment preference and long-term interaction with the enrichment items. Free operant, paired-choice preference assessments were run to determine the enrichment preferences o...
Presentation
Preference assessments are a valuable tool which have been used to determine favorite items in humans and nonhuman animals. In the past, these assessments were predominantly used to evaluate preference in humans with behavioral disorders to utilize favorites as positive reinforcers for behavioral management. More recent research have conducted pref...
Presentation
Presentation disseminating the findings of our June 2019 publication, "The Social Rank of Zoo-Housed Japanese Macaques is a Predictor of Visitor-Directed Aggression". Social network analysis which was not included in the publication was incorporated in the presentation to visualize the direction and rate of aggression in the macaques and toward the...
Poster
Full-text available
In the past, the evaluation of enrichment within zoological organizations has been primarily qualitative. At the Lincoln Park Zoo, we are trying to establish a feasible evaluation system that can quantitatively assess the enrichment given to every species, zoo-wide. To do so, a three-tiered evaluation process was put into place. The first tier focu...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
By conducting a retrospective analysis, we investigated how and if attendance was related to the occurrence of intraspecific and/or human-directed aggression in Geoffroy’s spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi), white-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys), and Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) over the course of five years
Archived project
Ten minute free operant paired-choice preference assessments were conducted with African lions, cheetahs, and Sumatran tigers at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park to find preferred environmental enrichment items. It was investigated whether African lion's preferred enrichment items were interacted with more frequently and in longer duration over the course of a 24-hour period.
Archived project
In the past, the evaluation of enrichment within zoological organizations has been primarily qualitative. We are trying to establish a feasible evaluation system that can quantitatively assess the enrichment given to every species, zoo-wide. To do so, a three-tiered evaluation process was put into place. The first tier focused on activity budget monitoring, the second tier consisted of enrichment interaction monitoring, and the final tier involved qualitative keeper rating of enrichment. This project focuses on the second tier by evaluating data taken from enrichment interaction monitoring of the Francois’ langurs. Using the ZooMonitor app, 183 observations of five focal enrichment items, were taken three times a day over the course of six months. During each five-minute observation, crowd size was scored at one-minute intervals and interaction with the focal enrichment item by juveniles or adults were scored on an all occurrences basis.