Jocelyn Steinke

Jocelyn Steinke
University of Connecticut | UConn · Department of Communication

Ph.D.

About

22
Publications
10,815
Reads
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918
Citations
Introduction
Jocelyn Steinke’s research focuses on images of science and scientists in the mass media. Her most recent research explores the influence of media images of women scientists and engineers on adolescent girls’ conceptions of gender roles and their occupational aspirations.
Education
September 1988 - August 1991
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Journalism and Mass Communication

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
YouTube videos offer a potentially useful vehicle for the communication of science, health, and medical information about COVID-19 to children. Findings from this research showed that primary characters appearing in children's educational YouTube videos about COVID-19 were most often adults, with about an equal number of men and women and few chara...
Article
Full-text available
Role models are critical for broadening participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); however, little is known about STEM role model characteristics most likely to promote identification. This study focused on adolescents’ preferences and identification with diverse STEM role models featured in online videos. Findings f...
Article
Full-text available
Popular media have played a crucial role in the construction, representation, reproduction, and transmission of stereotypes of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals, yet little is known about how these stereotypes influence STEM identity formation. Media images of STEM professionals may be important sources of infor...
Article
Full-text available
Images of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals in popular films influence public perceptions of the participation, status, role, and contributions of women in STEM. This study used content analysis and textual analysis to examine the prevalence and portrayals of female STEM characters in 42 popular films in the Uni...
Chapter
Scholarly interest in media portrayals of female scientists has emerged as a focus of media studies research because such portrayals (1) reflect cultural views and trends related to the status and roles of women in the workforce and society, and (2) are potential sources of information and influence about future professional roles for children and...
Article
Full-text available
Adolescents’ wishful identification with televised scientist characters was examined as related to interactions among the following variables: gender of participant, gender of scientist character, program genre, and selected character attributes. Findings indicated some gender differences in adolescents’ wishful identification with scientist charac...
Article
Full-text available
This content analysis examined portrayals of scientist characters in 14 television programs popular among or likely to have been viewed by middle school-age children. While male scientists significantly outnumbered and appeared in significantly more scenes than did female scientists, males and females were depicted similarly in reference to profess...
Article
Full-text available
Early adolescence is a critical time for fostering girls' awareness and interest in science, engineering, and technology careers as they actively construct their identities. Possible selves theory describes the factors that influence adolescent girls as they create current and future identities. Research suggests that media models can influence vie...
Article
Gender stereotypes in the mass media perpetuate traditional views of women that may influence children's perceptions of women in science, engineering, and technology. This study used a randomized posttest-only control group design to determine the efficacy of media literacy training on middle school–aged children's perceptions of scientists. Partic...
Article
This study examined the efficacy of media literacy training designed to teach critical thinking about gender stereotypes on middle school-aged children's recognition of gender stereotypes; perceptions of women in science, engineering, and technology (SET); and attitudes toward SET and SET careers. A total of 302 seventh-grade students were randomly...
Article
Full-text available
Images of female scientists and engineers in popular$lms convey cultural and social assump- tions about the role of women in science, engineering, and technology (SET). This study analyzed cultural representations of gender conveyed through images offemale scientists andengineers in popularjilms from 1991 to 2001. While many of these depictions of...
Article
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In the absence of real-life role models, images of women scientists and engineers on the World Wide Web can be important sources of information about women in science, engineering, and technology. This study analyzed the content of 27 science and engineering Web sites for girls and examined recurring themes in 168 of the biographies of women scient...
Article
Full-text available
In the absence of real-life role models, children may construct an understanding of the role of women in science based largely on images of women scientists they see in the media. This study assesses the images used in the portrayal of a female astronomer in the film, Contact. The themes used as a framework for the analysis were early encouragement...
Article
Full-text available
Bern's gender schema theory (Bern 1981, 1983, 1993) provides a useful framework for examining the influence of women scientist role models on girls’ perceptions of science and scientists. The purpose of this paper is (1) to describe how Bern's gender schema theory serves as a framework for guiding future research, (2) to examine the fundamental pre...
Article
Full-text available
Educational, attitudinal, and sociocultural factors create barriers that prevent girls and young women from pursuing opportunities in science. Of these barriers, gender-role stereotypes of science have been cited as a significant obstacle. This research analyses a US television series that counters gender-role stereotypes of science. The analysis f...
Article
Full-text available
Several media effects perspectives suggest that televised images can influence children's perceptions of science and scientists. This study analysed images of science and scientists in four children's educational science programmes. The images of science as truth, as fun, and as a part of everyday life, as well as the image that science is for ever...
Article
Full-text available
Although most people rely on the mass media to translate the abstract principles and technical jargon of scientific research into comprehensible information they can use to make informed decisions about their lives and about science policy, there is little research examining people's impressions of newspaper reports on science and how these impress...
Article
Television teaches children gender-specific behaviors, attitudes, characteristics, and personality traits. Research indicates that by observing male and female characters on television, children learn to label certain characteristics and behaviors as masculine or feminine and to assign traditional sex-role stereotypes to careers. Content studies of...
Article
Full-text available
Media images of engineers and scientists reinforce cultural stereotypes about the role of women in American society and in the engineering, scientific, and technical professions. These images can have a negative impact on adolescent girls who are making career plans at a time marked by waning self-confidence and a heightened awareness of cultural n...