Job Johannes Schepens

Job Johannes Schepens
Technische Universität Dortmund | TUD · Center for Research on Education and School Development

Cognitive Science: Artificial Intelligence

About

16
Publications
8,229
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352
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
Freie Universität Berlin
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2015 - August 2016
Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2014 - May 2014
University of Rochester
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
The coinciding form and meaning similarity of cognates, e.g. 'flamme' (French), 'Flamme' (German), 'vlam' (Dutch), meaning 'flame' in English, facilitates learning of additional languages. The cross-language frequency and similarity distributions of cognates vary according to evolutionary change and language contact. We compare frequency and orthog...
Article
Full-text available
Many people speak more than two languages. How do languages acquired earlier affect the learnability of additional languages? We show that linguistic distances between speakers’ first (L1) and second (L2) languages and their third (L3) language play a role. Larger distances from the L1 to the L3 and from the L2 to the L3 correlate with lower degree...
Article
Full-text available
When adults learn new languages, their speech often remains noticeably non-native even after years of exposure. These non-native variants ('accents') can have far-reaching socio-economic consequences for learners. Many factors have been found to contribute to a learners' proficiency in the new language. Here we examine a factor that is outside of t...
Article
Full-text available
Gender differences were analyzed across countries of origin and continents, and across mother tongues and language families, using a large-scale database, containing information on 27,119 adult learners of Dutch as a second language. Female learners consistently outperformed male learners in speaking and writing proficiency in Dutch as a second lan...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers on bilingual processing can benefit from computational tools developed in artificial intelligence. We show that a normalized Levenshtein distance function can efficiently and reliably simulate bilingual orthographic similarity ratings. Orthographic similarity distributions of cognates and non-cognates were identified across pairs of six...
Article
We investigated age-related decline in adult learning of Dutch as an additional language (L n ) in speaking, writing, listening, and reading proficiency test scores for 56,024 adult immigrants with 50 L1s who came to the Netherlands for study or work. Performance for all four language skills turned out to decline monotonically after an age of arriv...
Preprint
Full-text available
We investigated age-related decline in adult learning of Dutch as an additional language (Ln) in speaking, writing, listening, and reading proficiency test scores for 56,024 adult immigrants with 50 L1s who came to the Netherlands for study or work. Performance for all four language skills turned out to decline monotonically after an age of arrival...
Preprint
We investigated age-related decline in adult learning of Dutch as an additional language (Ln) in speaking, writing, listening, and reading proficiency test scores for 56,024 adult immigrants with 50 L1s who came to the Netherlands for study or work. Performance for all four language skills turned out to decline monotonically after an age of arrival...
Article
Full-text available
A reanalysis of data drawn by Hartshorne, Tenenbaum, and Pinker (2018) from two-thirds of a million English speakers showed that their overall conclusion of one sharply defined critical age at 17.4 for all language learners is based on artificial results. We show that instead of a discontinuous exponential learning with sigmoidal decay (ELSD) model...
Chapter
Full-text available
Cross-classified random effect models (CCREMs) are often used for partitioning variation in both experimental and observational linguistic data. However, crossed random effects may have more complex interrelationships than is generally assumed. This becomes clear when comparing first language (L1) and second language (L2) influences on proficiency...
Article
Full-text available
Applied linguistics may benefit from a morphological complexity measure to get a better grip on language learning problems and to better understand what kind of typological differences between languages are more important than others in facilitating or impeding adult learning of an additional language. Using speaking proficiency scores of 9,000 adu...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper the acquisition of Dutch gender by deaf Dutch adults and hearing adult Turkish and Moroccan L2 learners of Dutch is discussed. Although, in the Netherlands, gender acquisition has been studied amply in ethnic minority children and adolescents, research with regard to ethnic minority adults and deaf adults is limited. The analysis of g...
Article
Certain first languages (L1) seem to impede the acquisition of a specific L2 more than other L1s do. This study investigates to what extent different L1s have an impact on the proficiency levels attained in L2 Dutch (Dutch L2 learnability). Our hypothesis is that the varying effects across the L1s are explainable by morphological similarity pattern...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Better understand neurocomputational mechanisms underlying age-related performance changes in goal-directed decisions from experience