Joaquin Pascual Barea

Joaquin Pascual Barea
Universidad de Cádiz | UCA · Department of Classical Philology

Professor

About

89
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Introduction
Professor of Latin Philology in the University of Cadiz (Spain), since 1988. Graduate (1986) and. Ph.D. (1989) in Classical Philology at the University of Sevilla, . Fulbright fellowship for 1 year in the University of Michigan (1990/91), 6 months in Louvain (1999), 3 months in Munich (2001) and 6 months in Mainz (2010/11). Ranking 21 in H-Index Scholar and 10 in G-Index (professors of Latin Philology of Spain). Member of the Society for Latin Studies (SELat) since 1992; of the Spanish Society for Classical Studies (SEEC) since 1986, of the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies (IANLS) since 1993, and of Academia Latinitati Fovendae (ALF) since 2018.
Additional affiliations
March 1988 - present
Universidad de Cádiz
Position
  • Professor
March 1988 - present
Universidad de Cádiz
Position
  • Professor
Education
October 1981 - July 1989
Universidad de Sevilla
Field of study
  • Classical Philology

Publications

Publications (89)
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Presentamos la primera edicion, traduccion y comentario del epigrama a Santa Helena que Juan Gomez presento en la justa literaria celebrada en Sevilla el dia 29 de junio de 1555. Exponemos algunas hipotesis sobre la identidad de su autor, e identificamos a los dos teologos que dieron su aprobacion al poema: el doctor Francisco Sanchez, rector del C...
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Análisis e interpretación del pasaje de las Etimologías y de los términos tratados, incluyendo la corrección de lecturas, y el texto revisado. Señalamos sus fuentes, y explicamos la metodología y la concepción lingüistica del autor respecto a la etimología y el significado de las palabras. Según la estructura subyacente y armazón científico en que...
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A Enrique Ángel Ramos Jurado, con quien aprendí la lengua de Platón. Recibido: 12/03/2016 | Aceptado: 10/04/2016 Esta frase comparativa, documentada desde 1711 o 1713, fue creada hacia la segunda mitad del siglo XVII. Incluye los sentidos figurados de pluma por 'dinero' y de cacareando por 'gritando mucho' como una gallina, que se usaban con frecue...
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According to ancient Greek and Latin texts, ancient Iberia counted on three main races of horses: wild horses, jacks and steeds. Wild horses (equiferi) were hunted like deers. Domestic horses were divided into two races clearly differentiated by name and by a quality that made them especially suitable for certain tasks: a race was was suitable for...
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The word asellus is usually defined as a small donkey or a foal, as an equivalent of asinus, or as a poetic word. Here we refute these definitions and argue that from the first century B.C., asellus designates the working donkey, as opposed to the jack intended primarily to cover mares and jennies. This is called asinus, which remains also the gene...
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Various authors have attributed numerous place names in Spain and Portugal to the wild horse (equiferus), for which there is abundant evidence from the 1st century BC to the 16th century. However, considering certain linguistic arguments, the geographical situation and the nature of the terrain, many of these toponyms actually derive from the name...
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Overview of the usual addressers and addressees of the Carmina Latina Epigraphica of Gaul. In addition to the epitaphs, there is an abundance of votive poems and others inscribed in churches and in certain objects, as well as verses addressed to the reader. These inscriptions serve above all to express filial and conjugal love, both pagan and Chris...
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Overview of the usual addressers and addressees of the Carmina Latina Epigraphica of Gaul. In addition to the epitaphs, there is an abundance of votive poems and others inscribed in churches and in certain objects, as well as verses addressed to the reader. These inscriptions serve above all to express filial and conjugal love, both pagan and Chris...
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Critical commentary of the main Greek and Latin texts of the Antiquity on the selection of the stallion donkey, generally destined to the breeding of mules. I analyse various passages of Varro, Columella, Palladius and the Mulomedicina Chironis in Latin, and others of the Corpus Hippiatricorum Graecorum and the Geoponica from Apsyrtos in Greek, as...
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Review of the first edition, translation and study of an interesting work by Agostino Vespucci, a pupil of Poliziano and an early Machiavelli's correspondent, who visited and described Spain in 1513-1516. The text deals with Italian and Spanish humanists, with the history, geography and people of many Spanish cities.
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Review of a major work on the ancient toponyms of Andalusia recorded in the ancient written sources, including some remarks on the place names Cádiz or Cáliz from Gades, Getares from Cetariis, some toponyms formed with the feminine suffix -aria, Jaulón from Saudo, Uche from Urci, the names of villae formed with a person’s name and the suffix -ana o...
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I argue that Vrsianus, the fundus of the conuentus Gaditanus where Servandus and Germanus were martyred when they were transferred from Emerita Augusta to be shipped to Mauritania Tingitana, corresponds to Ojén in the Campo de Gibraltar. This place name of Cádiz is the expected phonetic result from Latin Vrsianus, and refers to an ancient farm cros...
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Critical edition, philological commentary and translation into Spanish of three Latin inscriptions preserved in Anse (France), with an analysis for their metric classification. The first one, written in elegiac dystics, may have served as a model for the second, which moved away from any known metric form in its process of adaptation; the third one...
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Benito Arias Montano played the vihuela or lute and sang Latin songs throughout his life. He believed that music has a supernatural power to alleviate the afflictions of the soul, and brighten people's hearts. Many of the Latin poems he composed were adaptable to the music he or other composers had created.
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First edition, translation and commentary of the chapter on Minerva (identified with Palas and Belona) of Caro's treatise on the ancient gods of Hispania, which is preserved in Oxford in an autograph manuscript from the Bodleian Library (Ms. D'Orville 47). The author refers to an island consecrated to Minerva on the Levantine coast according to Avi...
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The word asellus is generally defined as a small donkey or a foal, as an equivalent of asinus, or as a poetic word. Here, we refute these definitions, and show that since the 1st century BC, asellus has meant the service donkey, as opposed to the jack donkey intended mainly to cover mares and she-asses. The jack donkey was called asinus word, which...
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This article analyses and discusses the origin, meaning and use of twenty terms referring to horse colours in Etymologies of Isidore of Seville, of which we contend that murteus is the etymon of the Castilian morcillo, and that glaucus actually meant 'greyish thrush'. Isidore classifies colors into four groups: red, white, mixed and dark. The analy...
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Carchite is the prospective result of spoken Latin *car(i)cetu through the pronunciation of andalusi Arabic and Castilian. This word was formed by adding the collective suffix -etu(m), generally used with names of plants, to carice(m), from carex -icis, ‘reed’. This analogical form replaced the literary word carectum. Carchite is the name of a trib...
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After finishing his studies of Arts and Theology in Bologna, Rodrigo de Santaella stayed in Rome for at least five years; here he served Cardinal Jacopo Ammannati-Piccolomini, who wrote him a letter in Latin in 1476, and Pope Sixtus IV, before whom he delivered a sermon in Latin in 1477, and to whom he dedicated a dialogue in Latin in defense of ec...
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is article contains the edition and translation of a Latin epigram in praise of St. Helena of Constantinople for a literary contest in Seville. Its content and structure, its stylistic and metric features, and its literary sources are discussed.e author could have been Fernando Bravo de Zayas, who had studied Law in Bologna, and who later became...
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New etymological proposals for the town of Coripe from Latin corrivium (joint of streams in Latin), Utrera from Lateraria (brick factory in Latin), La Aguzadera, probably from La Abuzadera (action of lying face down to drink at a fountain), and Seville, probably from the Phoenician anthroponym Hisbaal. It also proposes corona for El Coronil, syllib...
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Study of the inscriptions TINGITANI and NAMA, graffitied on the inside of a horse drawn on a Tamuda ceramic jug from the 4th century AD. I interpret them as the names of the owner of the stable and of the horse, and the sign that appears between both words as a scorpion that would symbolize this African stable.
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Pliny only refers to one of the eleven remedies he knew from the equiferus or 'wild horse' (his blood drunk by asthmatic people), transmitted with another wording in the Cura quae ex equifero fit of a London medieval manuscript with the image of an equiferus. Pliny adds that Greek doctors did not write about this animal because it was not raised on...
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Biography and Latin and Castilian works of the poet Antonio Carrión, master of humanities in Seville
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Biography and Latin teaching works of the Spanish Jesuit Bartolomé Bravo.
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Biography and works of the poet and scholar Rodrigo Caro
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Biography and poetic works in Latin and Spanish of the 16th century Andalusian poet Juan de Quirós
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Biography and Latin and Castilian works of the humanist and ecclesiastic Rodrigo Fernández de Santaella (Carmona, 1444 - Seville, 1509)
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Benito Arias Montano in 1552, Juan de Santacruz Cárcamo in 1553 and Diego de Guevara in 1554 were the first poets officially laureated in the jousts celebrated in the University of Alcalá de Henares. We analyze the conditions of the joust, the draft of one of Arias' award-winning poems, the award-winning poems of Santacruz, and other circumstances...
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The ecclesiastical career of Rodrigo de Santaella in the pontifical court during the last quarter of the 15th century took place under the protection of Cardinal Jacopo Ammannati, the confidant and family member of Pope Pius II. This may explain why Santaella's odes to the Virgin imitate a dozen profane and religious poems by Piccolomini, and that...
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Study of the toponyms mentioned in the last chapter of the Libro de la Monteria by King Alfonso XI of Castile on the mountains of Tarifa and Algeciras in the mid-14th century during the conquest of Algeciras. We analyze the landscape of this area of the province of Cadiz near the Strait of Gibraltar through these toponyms, as its etymology can shed...
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First translation and edition (with the variants noted in the critical apparatus) of Rodrigo Caro's dedicatory letter of his Latin treatise on Mythology and Ancient Religion from Hispania to the Marquis of Estepa in 1629. We include a commentary on the structure, style and literary sources of the epistle, as well as some terms (deluco, vespillo, Ge...
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From two thirteenth century stories (the taking of Moron in the Chronicle of Fernando III and the siege of Chincoya in Alfonso X's Cantiga 185)), Lope created a literary hero for the seventeenth century Spanish society: Meledon Rodriguez Gallinato. This character is modelled upon some mythological and legendary characters from Antiquity and from th...
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Comparative analysis of jousts with Latin poetry contests in Alcalá de Henares, Salamanca, Seville and other Spanish cities between 1531 and 1575. On the basis of extensive research on ancient manuscripts and prints, I offer data and conclusions on the promoters of these jousts, their social and political implications, the conditions of the contest...
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Edition and commentary of a letter of recommendation from a Salamanca theologian and preacher, author of a treatise on oratory printed in 1629, for the treatise of Caro Veterum Hispaniae deorum manes sive relquiae.
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Commentary on the dramatic piece De la Concepción de Nuestra Señora by Father Bravo, attributed to the Castilian pedagogue Bartolomé Bravo (1554-1607).
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We offer the edition, translation and commentary of Hidalgo's epitaph, printed in 1604 in his Thesauro de la verdadera Cirugía. It was composed in a baroque style by his son-in-law, a professor of Medicine at the University of Seville, who erroneously placed the old Ategua in his native town of Marchena; he must have also composed the four verses f...
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Biography of Antonio Bohorques Villalón, summary of his Annals of Morón and commentary on the origin of Morón's name and the horse in his coat of arms.
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The reading mauro in Isidore's Etymologies (XII,1,55) is not the dative of the adjective maurus, but the nominative of the third declension of a noun referring to the Moor or Berber horse first, and later also to horses of another geographical origin with similar morphological characteristics. This word mauro is the origin of the medieval Spanish w...
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I analyze the different influence that poetic language and some motives of Ovid's work exerted in nine epigrams presented to a literary joust held in Seville in the middle of the 16th century. I comment on the textual sources and echoes of other ancient, medieval and Renaissance poets, as well as the structure and most outstanding literary resource...
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Linguistic and literary analysis of the testimonies containing this expression from the first quarter of the 18th century, which allows to establish its original meaning. This comparative locution was possible thanks to the previous metaphorical use of the noun "pluma" and the verb "cacarear" to refer respectively to the 'money' and to the 'voices'...
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Study of the role that agents other than authors and publishers had in the publication of Latin poetry books in Seville in the first decades of the 16th century. We analyze the editions of poems composed both by humanists and by classical and Christian authors of Antiquity, carried out among others by Jacobo and Juan Cromberger at the time of the a...
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These pages deal with linguistic issues relating to the Latin word cetaria, specifying its etymology and meaning in ancient sources and its results as a toponym; to Barbate, which conserves remains of the cetariae of Baesippo, and more briefly to Barbesula and the Guadiaro river, to Traducta and Algeciras, to Mellaria and Tarifa, to Besaro and Veje...
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I reject the six names so far proposed: Roscius, Ruscius, Rusius, Rutius, Rucius, Rustius, Rocius or Rusticus. That Ruchena, an important Roman villa with preserved remains, was the property of Rutilius, is documented by an inscription found on the site (CILA II,3 nº 986). I propose ascribing the town to the ager of Searo, taking into account its l...
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With this poem begins folio 128 of manuscript 155 of the National Library of Spain, which contains in this and the previous folio a series of poems copied by his disciple Juan Ramirez Ballesteros. Montano ends the epigram with a joke based on the words of Jesus Christ when he told his disciples that two knives were enough (Luke 22.36 and 38). Thus,...
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After describing the metrology, representations and variants of the Roman coins of Callet, we comment on the particularities of the Turdetan toponym Callet, the Latin names Calletani and Callenses, and the sense of the Roman nickname of Aeneanici allusive to Aeneas as the legendary founder of the lineage of Julius Caesar. The oppidum of these Roman...
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This work deals with the urban entity of the Roman archaeological remains from Mesa de Gandul. We then analyse the Latin epigraphy from Mesa de Gandul. Some authors have placed here the city of Lucurgentum, documented in an epitaph of unknown origin preserved in Alcalá de Guadaíra, and in an honorary epigraph found in Morón Air Base among other arc...
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Rodrigo Caro (1573 - 1647) wrote several treatises and fifty poems in Spanish and Latin. He also wrote letters and official documents in both languages. This was a common practice of those humanists who felt part of the Respublica litterarum. He wrote in Latin a treatise on the ancient gods of Hispania, and notes to his edition of Dexter's story, a...
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This study claims for Garcilaso de la Vega the authorship of a Latin epigram that the literary criticism of the twentieth century has denied him, attributing it to a son of the same name, of whom no poem is known or recorded. After offering an edition and critical commentary of the epigram, and a translation from Garcilaso's own poetic lexicon, H...
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I propose to locate Irippo, whose coinage may be dated between 44 and 25 BC, in the ancient city of Mesa de Gandul on the Guadaíra River, whose valley was controlled from this important city until that time. Here the most significant archaeological remains of an unnamed Roman town in the whole Baetica are still visible, and in the surrounding terri...
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This article describes the content and methodology of the treaty on the ancient Gods of Hispania by Rodrigo Caro (1573-1647). The autograph manuscript was written in 1628, but contains additions until 1641, when the author sent to Flanders a copy for printing, which eventually disappeared. Caro does not follow the allegorical method of traditional...
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This article contains the first edition and translation of an epitaph written by Arias Montano about 1551 to a young doctor and astronomer. The deceased could have been a son of Francisco de Arce. The study deals with its content, motifs and literary sources. It also includes an account of the links between Arias and Arceo, and of Arceo's books and...
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Pedro Fernández (c. 1487-1579) was Chapel Master of the cathedral of Seville from 1514 to 1568. He was also teacher of the "seises" or children of choir until 1551, when he was replaced by his colleague Francisco Guerrero, who called him "Master of the masters of Spain". He is credited with a profane Christmas carol, published in the Cancionero de...
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This paper deals with an epigram, which Ariae Montanus addressed to the Cordovan theologian Petrus Serranus, one of his teachers and friends at the Complutensian University, around 1551. The language, style, structure and topics of the poem are mainly based upon Martial , while the final joke about a 'Pythagorean mea!' with the meaning of a 'frugal...
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Biography and commentary on the work of Domingo Andrés, a poet born shortly before 1525 in Alcañiz, where he first studied before leaving for Valencia. Here he met Juan Lorenzo Palmireno, composed an epigram in praise of the author of a work printed in 1545, and two years later obtained a bachelor's degree. After a stay in several Italian cities in...
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This work deals with some features of the Latin metrics of Renaissance poets, who sought to imitate ancient poetry, but did so to a very different extent. The limited knowledge of that time conditioned the quality of their verses, but in some cases they only abide by the most general rules of versification, without even checking the quantity of all...
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Among Rodrigo Caro's papers was the draft of a poem attributed to Francisco Andino, published in the preliminaries of Caro's edition to the supposed Chronicles de Dexter and other authors. The numerous coincidences with some passages from other poems by Caro confirm that this Programma, which imitates Catulo's programmatic poem, is actually his wor...
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The castle of Cot corresponds to the hisn Aqût that Arab sources from the 9th to the 13th century allow to locate in this same place. This name, which comes from the Latin acutus, alluded in the Latin of the 8th century to the conical shape of the mountain, an 'acute' mountain that contrasted with the 'plain' mountain of the contiguous mountain ran...
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The role played by ancient Latin poetry and the composition of Latin poems in the vernacular poetry in the sixteenth century presents numerous coincidences with the influence of Greek authors and poems written in Greek by Roman authors in the birth of a cultured poetry in Latin. We find in both periods the same procedures of imitation and overbiddi...
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Critical edition, translation and commentary of the epigram. I identify the possible copyist who transmitted it with some textual errors, the recipient, the craftsman Lancero who made the knives given by Montano, and I precise the time and circumstances of its composition.
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Luis de Peraza, who wrote the first known History of Seville around 1535, had been a student of Pedro Núñez Delgado, Latin professor in the school of the cathedral of Seville. He therefore belongs to the third generation of poets and humanists of the Sevillian Renaissance, who lived through the reign of Emperor Charles V. In addition to some Castil...
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Biography of the Genoese banker Franco Leardo living in Seville. I comment on his commercial companies in some of the first expeditions to America, his relations with some Sevillian humanists (Pedro Mexía, Baltasar del Río), and the Latin poems he composed, which are edited in an appendix.
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El Arrahal is first mentioned in 1342,a century after the soldiers of king Ferdinand III conquered its lands. The remaining population preserved the common noun of this place in Arabic, ar-rahal, which also in 13th century Spanish referred to 'the sheepfold', where the flocks were garthered together. This also shows, against what has been believed...
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Benito Arias Montano invited a friend to have lunch one winter day during his studies at the University of Alcalá de Henares (1548-1552) with an witty epigram based on the first verses of Horace's fifth epistle. It has been written that Montano was always vegetarian and abstemious, and that he only ate for dinner; in this poem from his youth he dec...
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Montejil, in addition to a parish in Alenquer (Lisbon), is the name of three mountains in the provinces of Cadiz and Seville: one is located north of Jerez de la Frontera between Gibalbín and the ruins of Hasta, another south of Morón de la Frontera, and a third in the Sierra Norte of Sevilla in El Pedroso. This toponym, documented in Arabic and me...
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These two poems were composed for a triduum celebrated in Triana in reparation to the Blessed Sacrament, trampled on and thrown with the oats to the horses by the Protestants. They were composed following the brutal and sacrilegious devastation of the Flemish population of Tirlemont (Tienen) by French and Dutch troops on 9 and 10 June 1635, after w...
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This article contains the first edition, translation and commentary of an epigram that Arias Montano, during his studies in Alcalá de Henares, addressed around 1551 to his teacher Pedro Serrano. According to the poem, the Cordovan theologian also received Andalusian olives, soles from the Ocean and thistle stems, which were the best gifts he could...
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The conclusions to be drawn from the data obtained from more than 30,000 hexameters are that their frequency is half that of ancient poets; that, with a few exceptions, they present a dactyl in the fourth foot, which is usually a tetrasyllable word and not rarely a proper name at the end of a verse; that in some cases they imitate a classical verse...
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Commentary on the development of the manuals on the quantities of Latin syllables used in Spain since the end of the Middle Ages to compose quantitative poetry by grammarians such as Nebrija, Martín Ibarra, Palmireno, Mal Lara, Manuel Alvares and Bartolomé Bravo.
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Pedro Serrano, a native of Bujalance (Cordoba), was a schoolboy in the Colegio Mayor of San Ildefonso in Alcalá de Henares and a priest in the church of Santa María la Mayor. With Serrano, doctor in Sacred Theology, Benito Arias Montano established a prompt friendship that lasted thirty years, and of which we have the testimony of an epigram and so...
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Study of the etymology of the name of the fortress and village of Xillibar documented from the early years of the 10th century, today Geribel next to Montellano (Seville), from Latin sillybum (Hellenism transcribed as silebon in a late medical text). We offer a hypothesis of its origin in late Latin from an area abundant in thistles at the foot of...
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Study of the stylistic, semantic, syntactic and phonetic procedures of most of the odes to the Virgin published in Seville in 1504 as religious variations of Propercio's elegies, faithfully adapting the terms, motifs, themes, structures and metric and rhythmic schemes of the ancient amorous elegy to this religious poetry, from a peculiar imitation...
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The place name Morón is the Castillian pronounciation of Mauror, which was the Arabic pronounciation of Latin Latin Mauroru(m) ('of the Moors'), while the Medieval Spanish word morón means a kind of horse used to hunt in the mountains.
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I analyse how the Jesuit Bartolomé Bravo, in composing De optimo genere poematis, the second part of his Liber de arte poetica (Salamanca, 193), used the versification book of Georg Sabinus (Libellus de carminibus ad veterum imitationem artificiose componendis, Leipzig, 1551), who was the son-in-law of the greatest Protestant pedagogue Philip Melan...
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I propose a model of Spanish translation of the Latin works of the Renaissance, particularly those of a more poetic nature, which tries to adhere to the lexicon and expression of the Castilian poetry of that time. Thus, the translation is covered with literary resonances in tune with the period of the original poem, without detriment to its literal...
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This article includes the corrected text and the translation of an epitaph composed by Arias Montano in memory of Pedro Mexía. These ten verses are completely different from those copied by Francisco Pacheco and from the verses preserved in the tombstone. After analyzing the content and literary form of this epitaph, I come to the conclusion that i...
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Using a corpus of several hundred epitaphs from the 15th to the 18th century in Spain, I analyse their style and elements (consecration, name, age, date, deposition formula, dedicatee, circumstances) and other ingredients such as words of imprecation, of response, of invocation to the passer-by; praise; euphemisms; rhetorical figures and classical...
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Francisco Pacheco copied the Latin epitaph that Benito Arias Montano wrote for Pedro Mexía's tombstone, although, in both the prose and the verses, he introduced several errors and omitted some words and phrases. Francisco Mexía substituted Montano's verses with another poem consisting of the verses of four poems by Montano, Pedro Fernández and Fra...
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I prove that the Andalusian place name Moron, former Mauror (Mawrûr) in the Arabic texts, comes from Late Latin maurorum, 'of the Moors'. This and other evidences suggest that the population originatedd in the sixth century A.D. I also deal with the place name Arunci, now Aroche in the province of Huelva, and with a word morón that never meant hill...
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This chapter traces possible allusions to the New World in Latin poems printed in Seville up to the first third of the 16th century. The geographical words used throughout these decades reflect the successive interpretations and conceptions of these lands. The poets resorted to terms and expressions of the classical authors of Antiquity to designat...
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Analysis of poetic production in Latin in the city of Seville from the end of the 15th century to the middle of the 17th century.
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This article consists of the edition, translation and commentary of the 233 verses preserved from a cento by fray José de la Barrera, recited in Seville during the feast celebrated by the novices of the convent of St Augustine on the last day of August 1631. The poem deals with the birth of Jesus and the adoration of the Magi. The translation has b...
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Cupid Pendulus is a funny mythological episode in which the most original feature of Caro's poetry -the animism of the objects- stands out when a Roman statue of Venus comes to life with those of other ancient gods, like an ancient relief appeared in Lebrija that Caro interpreted as a scene of god Cupid while receiving a spanking in his naked ass....
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The influence of the Italian Renaissance made possible in Seville the existence of a group of humanists linked to the Church and to the teaching which, in their verses and in their classes, combined the style of ancient poetry with a Christian content. The Latin poems by Antonio de Nebrija, Rodrigo de Santaella, Juan Trigueros, Juan de Trespuentes,...
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This article contains the edition, translation and commentary of two Latin compositions by the Augustinian preacher Fray José de la Barrera, who was professor of Philosophy in Sanlúcar de Barrameda in the 17th century. The first consists of four verses and belongs to the genre of the versus rapportati: each verse consists of six words belonging to...
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Interpretation of Arist. int. II, 16a 29-32: When Aristotle calls ‘onoma aoriston’ (nomen infinitum) expressions such as ‘ouk anthropos’, he does not intend to introduce a new linguistic category, but rather speaks in terms of logic, since he always subordinates language to a logical and scientific purpose.

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